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Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Kat_Mia, Jun 14, 2004.


  1. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Some of you may know my DB is up for sale in the forum and around other places, so far, I have no suceeded in selling though. :bawl: I'm selling because really, I would like a 3/4 size rather than full size and I've had that bass for about 4 years and gentrally feel I need a change, and possibly something a bit better. not saying mine is good enough, you probabaly know what I mean.

    Anyways, I have tried bass after bass and still not found my perfect. :bawl: Mine is not quite right in some way and two I have looked at for sale are hard (as in opposite to soft) to play and the strings are ridiculously far away from the bridge. :bawl: I am in love with the one at school but it's the school bass and belongs to the music service for this county (Dorset, UK) so can't have that one. :bawl: It's a dream to play and I love it except sound isn't as good as it could be. But anyways, can't dwell on it so I won't.

    Soi, I'm now pondering over what I can do. Have any of you built your own? I would love to do something like that but I'm afraid it would cost too much. Plus I'm only 15 (16 on saturday) so would be a lot for me would it not? :confused:

    I just need a hand genrally, any ideas? :confused:

    Cheers guys. Kat xx :help:
     
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I have had the same experience in the UK with Double Basses as well!! :(

    So - I've tried a few and haven't really liked any of them - but have found it very difficult to get to try any - as shops here don't carry stocks, like they do of bass guitars.

    So - I've talked to quite a few DB players and it seems that the only way to get a reasonably-priced DB that sounds good is to have one made.

    So I was talking to another guy recently and tried his 5-string DB which was made locally for him. So - he put down a deposit of a few hundred £ and then paid the rest when he it was delivered and he was satisfied with it. This sounded really good, but ended up costing about £2,000 if I remember correctly

    Apart from this, my experience is that DBs are either around £1,000 and not up to much - don't sound that good - or are £5,000 and up to £15,000 !!! :eek:

    I just can't afford to spend more on a car than a DB and don't just have £10,000 lying around for this......:meh:
     
  3. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Phew, I'm not the only one then? I'd quite like to sell mine and save for an electric stand-up but that's a lot of saving. :bawl: At least then, you're less likely to have problems with hardness and as much to carry around. But...can't really play the electric in orchestra and stuff which is what I do. :bawl: I'm just bored of my bass now. Think I'm going to give up.
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    No - don't give up - get into Jazz!!

    I was put off instruments at school, but I love playing and learning about Jazz now - the Jazz Summerschool I attend is great fun and I get a lot out of it, on the playing and social side.

    For me, playing music with other people, is what inspires me and keeps me going - find some Jazz jams/workshops near you and try to get into it - they're always looking for DB players and I've met people of all ages playing Jazz - just keep an open mind!! ;)
     
  5. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Not much jazz near me, it's not a big thing. It's all orchestral and seeing as I'm joining the county orchestra in sept, I need a DB! :bawl: :bawl:
     
  6. Bruce, you really have a way with WORDS!
     
  7. Okay to a point Bruce, but Kat, are you really expecting to find the perfect bass for you perfectly set up? This ain't gonna be the time to find your career bass now is it?

    You can get playable basses £600 to £1000, but leave yourself £200 aside for a new set of strings and a top class set up. Instruments I've tried in this price range were often set-up badly. A bad set-up doesn't mean its a bad bass. I'd worry more if the action was too low - you're talking a new bridge (or maybe installing adjusters) even if its a good one.

    Get a reasonable secondhand DB and it wont loose money, unlike an EUB. If you've got the dosh I reckon £2.5K+ minimum for a decent Chinese bass, but I take it you're not joining the LSO just yet so why worry?

    One thing, and it applies to all instrumentalists who don't have years of experience, the bass you find plays best will be the one most simmilar in set-up to you're own - because that's what you're used to. And don't forget that the rooms you're trying them out in may not help either, though sometimes this works the other way.

    You can get thoroughly p**d off at the TB mantra of find a teacher, but if you're not sure, an experienced persons judgement is essential. And often teachers know what bassses are around and for sale - they tend to network when it comes to instruments for sale or wanted.

    DB shopping in the UK is a pain in the bum, but since you should be able to pass on a well set up 3/4 OK just add trading to your CV!
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    May not be relevant to this debate - but that's a lot of money for most people to find - so my EUB was under £2k and I was only able to afford it on interest-free credit. I wish I was wealthy enough to have thousands of pounds just lying around doing nothing!! ;)
     
  9. yeah but how much was your amp? :D

    BTW, I was in Brighton and whilst I didn't find the jazzy bit I think its a real cool place - I love the bit Boho area behind the Pavillion - nice place to live but I can guess why you got no spare cash.
     
  10. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Oh dear! I'm lost. I'm never going to sell mine anyways, it'll saty up for sale forever at this rate but only because everyone I know has got a bass already!
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    I'm sure if you are determined to sell, you will be able to - try local papers or free magazines - these are quite popular for buying and selling - plus there is always the dreaded eBay - you could try the UK version?
     
  12. Kat - I've just had a look at the pics of your bass and it looks very much like a Zeller to me. In fact, are you sure its a 4/4 - what's the string length? The bridge LOOKS to be poor quality - its on the thick side. It might be worth carting it along to a good luthier, getting the set-up checked and keep it. After all, if this plays better than one's you're trying then you're obviously having no problem with its size playing-wise and if it is 4/4 playing 4/4 does have a certain amount of cache. Whatever, I would advertise the string length since for a 4/4 bass this is a sticking point for most people.
     
  13. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Don't know what the string length is and it's in it's case to keep from damage during loft conversion so don't really want get it out. It's just a Romanian bass to me. Didn't want to say this but....truth is, I'm selling because I find it too hard to play. Hard as in opposite of soft not hard as in difficult and I really don't like the size. I'm fussy. I've nearly given up before now and I think because I'm too fussy I will end up giving up, just like I've given up everything else. I'm not rich enough to make one, have my own one etc etc. If I advertised the sring length in papers and mags near me, I'd get loads of phone calls saying what size is that! LOL!
     
  14. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    It can take a while to sell a bass, so be patient.

    What is bothering you as far as playbility with 'Woody'? (A blush at writing such a thing to our young miss Kathmia). If the body is too large for you, consider playing on a stool if you're not at present. This can serve to make the bass feel a lot smaller. Other than that, there is almost nothing that can't be solved with playability with a good setup.

    My recommendation is to spend a little dough getting your current setup playable (buy a stool, see a luthier, whatever) and keep yours on the market until it sells. Not getting rid of it right away could be a blessing in that you'll have some time to save up so that when you find a fiddle that really grabs you you'll have the cash to get it.
     
  15. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    I am on a stool which is about 3ft off the floor! LOL! Good job I got long legs! I'll see how it goes, I guess. I just find it really hard going on my left hand and I'm not sure why. Oh, and just in case you're wondering, Woody is named as Woody because when I phoned the lady about agreeing to buy him, I watching Toy Story and thought it was a good name for a bass, be it a wooden one in this case! ;)
     
  16. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    From what you say, I think that if you were to do some work on setup and string choice you might be a lot happier with your current setup.
     
  17. Hard as in opposite of soft? You may need some lower tension strings, or lower action. You'd lose a little volume, but you might like the bass better if it offered less resistance.

    Good grief! You'll never get anything done if you say things like that! You'll just end up believing it, and never stick with anything.
     
  18. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    First off, happy impending birthday, Kat.

    I'm with Ray on this one. I think the first thing you should do is to have a bass luthier have a look at it. Tell him/her what you've told us here. There are so many variables that decide what makes a bass playable, a person who can set it up for you is your very best friend. String choice is important, too; check the threads here for more info on that subject. Bass is physically hard to deal with in the beginning, but if you stick with it, it becomes very natural with time.

    Bruce has documented how difficult it is to find an adequate DB in the UK. Since you already have one in hand, why not try and see how good you can get it sounding before you give up on it?
     
  19. Kat_Mia

    Kat_Mia Guest

    May 7, 2004
    Dorset, UK
    Awww, yay! Thanks for the happy birthday! Yes, will talk to my bass teacher as I don't like the person that worked on it before, he did a terrible job. Bruce, who do you go to?
     
  20. Kat

    Couldn't help chiming in - It would be sad if you gave up bass without at least trying other basses or having yours set up with decent strings and reasonable action. If the string length is 42" or less you needn't worry about size. Your bass looks servicable to me. As my teacher once told me, if playing bass was easy, everybody would be doing it. It takes some dedication like any other instrument, but the rewards will come. If you like the sound, concept and social context of bass you should stick with it. I made the mistake of quitting upright when I was your age and didn't pick it up again for 15 years. I still regret that now because if I had know then what I know now I would be such a better player! At that time though, electric seemed more hip - It didn't occur to me that I didn't have to choose one over the other. I have since changed my mind.

    Good luck to you.

    Jon