Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Hey fellow TB.com bassists, DB.... is it really worth it?

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Tronictq, Jan 2, 2002.


  1. Tronictq

    Tronictq

    Jan 23, 2001
    Well,

    I've been really itching to get a double bass, but that's a big financial undertaking itself, let alone after you spend all that money trying to learn the instrument.

    You see, i've never played a double bass, but for some reason i've always wanted one, every since i started bass. I'm into jazz, and would love to be a jazz bassist some day....

    Will i most likely like the DB after i get it? or is it a touchy thing.

    I'd really really appreciated any respones. Thx

    -T
     
  2. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    People dedicate their lives to playing it. I'll offically have 20 years at it in three days.
     
  3. Thats how most of us started. You won't regret it. (Your wife might however...I tend to spend more time with the bass than with her....)
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    ELECTRONICtq,

    I was a professional jazz pianist who doubled on Slab when I got my first Realbass. I've been reviewing my yearly gig records recently, and I discovered that since then, I've played only 6 piano gigs since that fateful day, all of them in the first 8 months after THE BASS showed up. After devoting my life to the piano for about 15 years, I haven't practiced piano to speak of in over 2 1/2 years. When people tell you that Realbass becomes an all-consuming enterprise, many of them really mean it.

    But that's a good thing.
     
  5. Tronictq

    Tronictq

    Jan 23, 2001
    I think I'm scared!! :p

    People dedicating their lives to the instrument explains why so many that have a DB are awesome bassists! Correct me if I'm wrong.

    So so far , 3 out of 3 thing it is a great move.
    I guess I'll have to talk to my teacher a bit more....

    Anyways thx all.

    -T
     
  6. Is there somewhere that you can try one out?
    For a while, a couple of times.

    I had an interest in the DB but nothing huge. . .until I played one at a local store. First thing that went through my mind "aw, crap another expense" the smile on my face won over the wallet.

    A little over 6 months on the DB and the smile and pleasure will not leave. I don't think it will.

    Is it really worth it?
    What a silly question.
     
  7. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    Nothing sounds as cool as a double bass. It may not be as easy to play as a violin (well, in the way that to play the same thing on violin and bass), but it is worth it.

    This is just my opinion, though, not yours. You should find out for yourself.
     
  8. Tronictq

    Tronictq

    Jan 23, 2001
    Well... there is a way I "could" try one out, but i don't want to touch it. I see it once a week, I'm in the same room as it every week. The thing is, it's made in 1841 - France. and i don't want to touch it :) It's my teachers, and I have a lesson every Saturday. So yeah there's a way. He'd love to have me on upright.... but it is another expense as you mentioned Mr. G. Puppy.



    -T
     
  9. Oh, that could be a scary trend.

    I say ask you teacher, I bet he will show you how to play it, and yes you probally will be hooked.
    Don't worry about the money, ya can't keep it for ever. :D
     
  10. Tronictq

    Tronictq

    Jan 23, 2001
    Let me clarify, my financial situation is not the greatest.... i'm a 16 year old! :p


    -T
     
  11. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA

    Is the financial situation of a 16 year old bad? You may not have much of an income, but you probably don't have to pay for rent/house payment, food, electricity, telephone bills, water, home repairs... Well i guess there is gas money, insurance, and car payments/payment.

    I guess i can pull it quite a bit of money for a 14 year old, but i walk my neighbors dog, get paid for mowing, and doing jobs like cleaning gutters, yard work, moving six dump truck loads of lumber to the side of my neighbors house (that hurts.)
     
  12. Tronictq

    Tronictq

    Jan 23, 2001
    "Is the financial situation of a 16 year old bad?"

    Well, No. Since that they DON"T have any bills to pay (most likely) even if they didn't have much money, it's not a life threatening thing.

    And also, the amount of money a teenager can bring in, depends on an amount of factors. The location : Urban, Rural, State/Province, Parents, Opportunities due to location. So.... BUT I do have an opportunity next summer to grow a garden, and sell the fresh produce at the farmers market. Should rake in a few thousand $$ :p

    -T
     
  13. Audge2002

    Audge2002 Guest

    Jan 4, 2002
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    I have found so much joy in playing the double bass. I enjoy playing the electric as well, but there are so many styles that can be explored on an acoustic. So many bassists limit themselves because they think the electric is "cooler" and the music associated with it is better, but I think my playing a Sibelius symphony helps my musicality more that just playing rock, etc. Hey, you don't have to play classical, but don't limit yourself to one kind of style... or instrument. Aim to be well-rounded.
     
  14. Audge2002

    Audge2002 Guest

    Jan 4, 2002
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Honey, I am a broke college student that plays a $16,000 double bass w/ a C-extension, that the college I go to supplies. Before I got so darn lucky, I played what my friends refered to as a "cartoon bass" because of its "odd" coloring. The thing sucked! And, no, I am not in a better situation right now... once I graduate with my well-earned degree, I will still have no instrument of my own... I have to give up that beautiful instrument that nurtured my technique. Here is my advice: Save up a few hundred dollars, and buy or rent a student bass from an instrument retailer, like Lentine's or Educators'. That way you at least have something to play... you know, my cartoon bass was the best thing I had in high school, and though it sucked, I loved the thing! Hey, and if you stumble across a nice professional gig of a bass... let a sista know!
     
  15. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Simply put, you should rent for a while - it seems like an obvious solution to me. I am 32 and have only been playing bass for a year. I played piano for about twenty years and some trumpet as well. I love everything about the bass and wish I had taken it up earlier. For me at least, it is the instrument I really feel a real connection with. I achieved some success with other instruments but never felt a real connection with any of them. I play jazz by the way.

    Although I could have gone out and spent a bunch of money on a bass when I started, it was smarter to begin by renting. I am serious enough about the instrument that I knew it wasn't just going to be passing fad for me but I still rented for about ten months and only got my bass about two months ago. Try and find a rental that is well setup and if you can, try and bow your own decent bow. Although I play jazz, I practice with the bow a fair bit because it's good for your left hand and heck jazz arco sounds great anyway. However playing with a **** rented bow on a crappy rented plywood bass was not much fun.

    While you are renting you can work out whether you really want to pursue the bass seriously. If you decide to make it one of your life's passions then you can take your time while renting, to decide what you want in a bass before buying one. When I started a year ago, I knew pretty much nothing about double basses but I spent a lot of time asking questions on lists and forums and researching everything I could. I also made sure I got myself a good teacher.

    Good luck.

    Adrian
     
  16. tnb

    tnb

    Jan 12, 2002
    New England
    I purchased my first DB a couple of years ago. It has turned into nothing short of an obsession. I have even seriously considered trading in my electrics and upgrading my current DB.
     
  17. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    I wouldn't be too quick to do that, t... though the double bass is What I Love, and constitutes most of my work, there is an occasional month or so when the slab really helps to pay my mortgage. I wouldn't want to be without at least one bass guitar.
     
  18. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Ed, you are indeed correct that renting is an unrecoverable cost and there is certainly a point at which renting becomes a losing proposition. I knew as I was getting towards the end of the first year of rental that I had better purchase something because I would have paid for about 1/3 of the cost of the bass.

    For me at least, it worked out well. I live in Ottawa, Canada and there are very few sources of good basses here. There is no Kolstein or Hammond-Ashley or anything like that. Some of the local shops (that really specialise in violins) do have anywhere from two to six basses at a time but most are junk and not setup properly at all.

    I was very fortunate to buy my current instrument locally but opportunities like that are rare in these parts.

    Adrian
     
  19. tnb

    tnb

    Jan 12, 2002
    New England
    Ed, I play bass full time. In the daytime I care for my 11 month old daughter. I understand completely about electric bass and doing lame gigs. The quality of he gigs that I do on upright are much better than the garbage I have to play on electric far to frequently.
    That having been said, Marcus is right in telling me not to sell my Sadowsky. I may never be as good on upright as I am on electric. Maybe it is the 23 year head start. I do love playing electric. Lately, I have been working it into jazz gigs with quite a bit of success, so thing are looking good. Now all I have to do is get enough good gigs that I can tell the really "questionable" bands to find someone else.
     
  20. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    This should be published under the title, "Diary of a Professional Musician". Is there anybody here who can't relate to this sentence?