high number of thumb 6 in the classifieds?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by TheMaynorD, Oct 26, 2019.

  1. TheMaynorD

    TheMaynorD Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    Oklahoma City
    Is it just me or has there been a spike in the amount of 6 string warwicks in the classifieds as of late? For those of you who have tread the halls of TB since before primitive man first discovered fire and subsequently fired the drummer, is this a trend? Or did someone find out that warwicks are known to the state of california to cause cancer and I have just been left out of the distro email?

    Or maybe a bunch of cats just realized that Jaco only needed 4, and that despite German made wenge growly goodness, their thumbs were not in fact a P bass with tort pickguard and flats.

    Curious since my thumb has had around 6 owners I think yet every single one raves about it even after the sales pitch is complete and money has changed hands.
     
  2. Goatrope

    Goatrope

    Nov 18, 2011
    Sarasota Florida
    Maybe they’ve become a rite of passage.

    Owning one is something one does to see for themselves what “nothing else sounds like”.

    Then they realize they’re really happier with what everything else sounds like.

    ***I am a Thumb NT owner, but play other basses more frequently.
     
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  3. madmaskbass

    madmaskbass

    Apr 29, 2008
    Australia
    haha ironic you mention this as i have been scouring the world looking for 6 string thumbs as they are my favourite bass of all time bar none!! I had not noticed the spike in sales at all...I did see that there was one recently listed and didn't last two days. That being said in all honesty:

    I think they are overrated and that everyone should just by P basses and ding walls as these old brown dinosaurs are just heavy, cumbersome planks that should be sold internationally at rock bottom prices.

    The NT6 is not for many...you hear the same thing everytime sound great but plays like crap etc...they do honestly weigh alot lol and there's a level of commitment to wielding the beast! I have played a 2.5 hour set with mine and can attest to the heft. But as they say...you don't slay dragons with daggers..
     
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  4. Sid the Kid

    Sid the Kid

    Jun 7, 2013
    Illinois
    They are too expensive for me to purchase, or you wouldn’t see them. :D

    Really though I think it’s a compromise situation. They are heavy, tighter string spacing than some 6’s, lack a strong low end, and hard to try in person. Seems like you have to go all in and completely fall in love or know that it’s a tremendous bass but just not for you. Seems to be no middle ground. Heaven forbid you drive it off the lot only to not love it and sell it for 1/3 of the cost.

    Being expensive makes riding the fence about keeping or selling an easy decision. $3K is a ton of cash for something that you know is tremendous but ultimately is not for you.

    Also, as you said, the same bass is going up for sale 5-6 times. If the bass landed with someone who was truly in love with it, or someone with disposable income who really likes it, then it would probably not come up for sale until tragedy strikes.
     
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  5. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    Lol. We all know the actual BEST bass is a Dingwall P bass!

    I have a Thumb BO 5, and there is some truth in the "rite of passage" concept. Beyond that, though, is the fact that German Warwicks are well made, great playing and sounding basses. However, they tend to be heavy, and as most of us are weight weenies these days, a lot of Warwick basses end up in the used market.
     
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  6. TheMaynorD

    TheMaynorD Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    Oklahoma City
    Yup. I think mine plays just fine but I played heavy 6 strings for 8 years before my thumb so the jump to a Thumb wasnt egregious. I can see going from a 4 string P bass to a 11.5 lb thumb 6 being somewhat frightening.
     
  7. TheMaynorD

    TheMaynorD Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    Oklahoma City
    I think that is a large part of the issue. I see the ones getting snapped up are the 90s era for around 1800-2400. The newer ones for 3k float around a while.


    All the comments make sense. I am looking at throwing nordstrand zen blades in mine to see if that helps me achieve tonal nirvana.
     
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  8. madmaskbass

    madmaskbass

    Apr 29, 2008
    Australia
    HAHA love it!! Well my bass is as heavy as they get...my cab is heavier than many adult men and my head is not far behind...I'm just being silly because it is fun but i do believe that for me the gains of tone over the ridiculous weights are worth it for me. For me the true reason I lug it all is thinking back to all of the shows I have seen and the tones that truly move me to the core were made by monster rigs carried, of course by roadies, and I challenge my inner roady everytime and schlep it and beg!!
     
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  9. madmaskbass

    madmaskbass

    Apr 29, 2008
    Australia
    What does yours have now? Mine is MEC pre and Seymour Duncan actives 18v from factory and I love it all. I did have a 2015 BO5 thumb that was all MEC, 9v and 2 band eq and I really loved that aswell although voiced slightly differently. I think the SD are a good compromise between the harshness of EMG and the darkness of Barts.
     
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  10. wvbass

    wvbass Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2004
    West Virginia
    I have a bunch of basses, and while I appreciate a lighter bass, only two basses give me pause because of their weight. One is my T-40, and the other one is NOT my Warwick. I'm not in the camp of "heavier sounds better," though. There might be something to that, but I'm not buying it just yet.
     
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  11. In the local CL in my area there are 3 Warwicks right now. Not Thumb 6, but that seems like a lot to me. Coincidence?
     
  12. oaklandthumb

    oaklandthumb Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2014
    Tacoma
    You could write an identical thread about any bass on the used market. Some weeks I cant see anything but fodera or Sadowkys or cheap entry level basses. It's just a coincidence. No really.

    What's guaranteed is whatever bass I might be looking for at the moment will not be found used until a couple of days after I've bought a different bass to satisfy the urge, which I will then have to sell at a loss to buy the (thumb 6) I was searching for.
     
  13. It's not really the sound of German Warwicks that's the cause of the non bonding. It's the physical aspect. Almost distant or maybe too present. When you play you almost like the bass to disappear into you. Hold a TRB6 and a Warwick 6 any model and that's what I experienced. I have been trying them since 1991

    Having said that I am jus completing a deal with fretless German Corvette 4 fretless because the price is too good to ignore and it has De Lanos and this one is old and well worn. I know hypocrite but also a cheapskate who never paid for more than 1500 for a slab bass.
     
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  14. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    Warwick has not changed.
     
  15. I had a NT6 for a while. It was the last Warwick I owned.
    97B005B3-C77B-4BF2-9A41-ED09A071C15D.jpeg
    Before that I owned a bo5 and nt5 as well as some German corvettes
    127CCE86-44B8-4524-9157-7BFC834C684D.jpeg 95DE8DE7-D00F-4020-A920-551A71C081A6.jpeg
    They are really good basses imo and thumbs are my favorite Warwicks by far (although I’ve never had a chance to play a dolphin) The nt5 was my main player for ten years. After a while I just wanted to try something different. So I had a few basses in between the nt5 and the Nt6. My second Musicman SR5, an ESP, even a conklin 7 string before getting the nt6. Then I got my Dingwall and not long after that I sold the NT6.

    As for why I sold it. Comparing my Dingwall to the NT6 there were several things I liked better about the Dingwall specifically when it comes to playing in my band . The Dingwalls multiscale and lighter weight are more just more comfortable for me for long rehearsals and energetic shows. The weight of thumb basses can vary a little but the thing is the heavier ones tend to have less neck dive than the lighter ones for example. The neck through thumbs I had balanced well and didn’t have the neck dive issues thumbs are notorious for but they were also on the heavy side. My NT6 was 12 1/2 pounds. More than a 3 pounds heavier than my Dingwall. Also, with my band I do some slapping and the high C string on the 6 was getting in the way making certain parts much more difficult to play. Several nit picky little things like that.

    When I first got the NT6 I really looked at it as a great all around bass that I could use for anything from playing mellow music by myself where the upper register got more use to playing in hard rock and metal in bands where the low register got more use. But these days i have a different mindset. I’m more of the thinking that different basses are better for different situations. If I want to slap or play heavy music I’m grabbing my 5 string Dingwall. If I want more of an old school sound I grab my passive fender, I’m currently saving up for a custom 7 string Clement bass as well for that upper register stuff like playing chords and tapping and playing by myself. But yeah as far as the more specific tools line of thinking aside from the extra strings being welcomed in some situations and being in the way in other situations i actually noticed that I prefer different types of setups on basses depending if they are 4,5,6 or 7 string and what I use them for. On 5 string with my band for example I prefer bigger action so that I can dig in without sounding like buzz lightyear. On the conklin 7 string I preferred lower action as it was the bass I grabbed for softer music and different techniques like two hand tapping instead of slapping. The nt6 in a way was a great compromise. But that was the problem. I don’t want to compromise. I want a specific tool for a specific job. For people who only want to own 1 bass to do a big variety of things I highly recommend the thumb nt6. But I’m almost 40 now. Years of flipping gear, hundreds of gigs, countless hours of work and I graduated from college twice to be where I am today. I don’t want to compromise anymore. I want specific tools for specific jobs.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2019
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  16. I'm in a similar position as the post above. I'm a huge fan of the Warwick sound for heavy music. Warwick with MEC pickups, bright rounds, into a Darkglass pre just sounds brutal. That said, I greatly prefer 5 strings for that sort of thing. I always use a 6 when I play jazz but I prefer a more modern kind of tone I guess. My 6 has Nordstrands and an Aguilar pre.
     
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  17. TheMaynorD

    TheMaynorD Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    Oklahoma City
    Literally a month after a sold my bongo 6 to fund the thumb 6, someone wanted to trade their thumb for a bongo
     
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  18. TheMaynorD

    TheMaynorD Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 28, 2013
    Oklahoma City
    What nordys do you have in yours? Im looking at swapping aguilar DCBs out with zen blades. Currently has the nordy preamp with aguilar dcbs
     
  19. I have Dual Coils. I guess I worded that funny though, I don't have a Warwick 6 it's an Eshenbaugh. I use a Warwick 5 for metal stuff though, it has MEC's.
     
  20. JW56789

    JW56789 Guest

    Feb 18, 2017
    I think Warwicks (in particular the German ones in the dense African woods) are one of those axes you think you should like and use, but once you've lived with it for a while, the design brief they used to get to that tone, especially enlarged to a 6-string version turns out to be a little too-narrowly focused for a lot of guys not used to those ergonomics and that sound . . . . . and that weight.

    No arguments about their build quality, but more of an 'outside the box' axe than many may realize in the beginning. Run properly, though, they can be quite compelling, just listen to the tone and presence under the instrumental break:



    (I love Jim Messina's tone on this: You can take the boy out of Bakersfield, but you can't take Bakersfield out of the boy . . . . . and forgive me, I don't know the bassist's on this track.)
     
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