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High tension flats

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by joerosen, Nov 17, 2003.


  1. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    About a week ago I put a set of Fender 9050ML flatwound, gauges 50-100 on my Rickenbacker 4003. They sound ,much better then the Ernie-Ball flats I used to have (just couldn't stand the dead "E").
    The problem is the V E R Y high tension the Fender have. I think the neck got a little bow, the action is a bit high for me, and when I low it, I get that buzz on the higher frets :( (problem I never had with my previous sets of strings).
    Do you think a set up would solve it, or should I try a nother string brand?
    Thanks guys.
     
  2. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    Definetly a good set up would help. Being able to get low action isn't just about neck relief. It's a combination of neck relief and bridge height. As long as you don't have any high frets you should be able to get your action down to where you like it.
     
  3. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    I can get the action as low as possible with the bridge, but the I get the buzz from the higher frets.
     
  4. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    Just so we're clear. When you say "higher frets" do you mean the frets closer to the body or the frets closer to the headstock?
     
  5. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    No, the frets that close to the pick-up.
     
  6. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    It's been my experience that when I get buzzing passed the 7th or 8th fret then my bridge is to low.
    I usually set my neck relief first. I do this by using a capo at the first fret.
    Then I press the string down at the last fret.
    Then I slide a Thin Fender pick between the string and the 7th fret.
    I adjust the neck relief until the string just barely moves when I do this.
    Then I'll lower the bridge until I get buzzing on the upper frets then raise just a hair.
    By doing this I get an action of about 3/64ths on an inch at the 12th fret.
    This method works great for me regardless of string type or tension. It also gives me a consistant set up.
     
  7. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    I see. So, in your opnion I should see my guitar tech.
     
  8. Yes, you can do that, or you can read this and see if it will help you understand what is going on, then take it to your tech.

    http://www.garywillis.com/pages/bass/bassmanual/setupmanual.html

    Fender flats have higher tension then the TI Flats , but you should let your tech set your action with what ever strings you will be using.

    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  9. bassic1959

    bassic1959

    Jan 16, 2003
    I too tried the Fender flats and did not like them for the same reason. The high tension just was not for me. TI's suit my style a lot better. If you like the feel of the strings though, follow the advice and do or get a proper setup done. It's not that hard to do, just don't try to hurry it. The guide Treena posted will get you through it.
     
  10. PhilMan99

    PhilMan99

    Jul 18, 2003
    US, Maryland
    I'd get 'em off NOW, and get some strings with less tension. TI Jazz Flats (available from juststrings.com) have low tension (lower than most roundwounds). juststrings.com's website also lists tension for many of the strings.

    Don't hurt that poor Ric - get 'em off! If they have that much more tension than what you had before, IN MY OPINION, even adjusting the truss rods may place too much strain on the neck.

    I'm still "hurting" 20+ years after killin' my poor Fender Jazz doing something similiar, and getting a (dreaded) permanent "s-shaped" warp in the neck.
     
  11. PhilMan99

    PhilMan99

    Jul 18, 2003
    US, Maryland
    FYI - I vaguely remember hearing of problems on Rics with string tension. Rics may be unusually sensitive in this area, but I'll defer to a good web-search (by you) to confirm this...
     
  12. Ricks did have problems with high tension strings. 4001 did, but now the 4003 are suppose to be better!

    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/guitars/rickenbacker/section-23.html


    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  13. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    'cause my guitar tech set it up fine. Now, I know that the RIC neck is more stable, thanks to the double truss.
    Isn't it?
     
  14. PhilMan99

    PhilMan99

    Jul 18, 2003
    US, Maryland
    Personally, I defer to your tech...
     
  15. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    ?
     
  16. PhilMan99

    PhilMan99

    Jul 18, 2003
    US, Maryland
    He (or she) is a "paid professional" that does this stuff every day. I'm just a bass-player that does his own setups...

    Believe them, not me...
     
  17. Joe, no one wants to commit to telling you what to do with your bass, we can't see it, so we don't know exactly what you are talking about.

    Your tech is more qualified to fix your bass than we are. If they make a mistake they have to fix it.

    Good luck.

    [​IMG]
    Treena
     
  18. joerosen

    joerosen

    Jan 30, 2002
    Tel-Aviv, Israel
    You know, my tech is really great, but I take to listen to your advices seriously. They usualy very helpful :).
    Thanks a lot.
     
  19. I got an email last night from Richard Cocco, President of Labella. He was responding to a query I made some time back about the tension of 0760M Jamerson strings. It is 197 pounds for the 4-string set.