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High Tension String Lovers

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by lloganbracee, Apr 16, 2018.


  1. lloganbracee

    lloganbracee

    Sep 9, 2017
    Everyone has a basic set of unique standards for a set of strings before they go & spend money on them. Mine are longevity & (most importantly) high tension. I’ve got to be able to dig in with my fingers.

    Right now I’m running the .050-.070-.085-.105 D’addario Chromes set to meet this need. I love it. I’ve also heard good things about Rotosounds & I’d like to give them a try at some point.

    What are your favorite high tension strings? I’m especially interested in seeing which rounds have a bit of stiffness.
     
    Arthur U. Poon and Linnin like this.
  2. For me personally, it's a matter of achieving the delicate balance between being supple and comfortable enough for the left-hand (fretting) and being firm enough for the right hand (plucking).

    That said, my all-time favorite is the GHS Pressurewound ML7200 (44-58-80-102).
     
    BradH and smogg like this.
  3. lloganbracee

    lloganbracee

    Sep 9, 2017
    I’m sure I’d opt for the M7200 (44-62-84-106) set. How long do these last for you? Also, when you say, “firm enough for the right hand,” what exactly does that mean for you? How aggressively are you plucking?
     
  4. The last two sets of PWs I used were both 12 mths old when I took them off, still with some life left in them.

    I wouldn't call myself an "aggressive player" necessarily, but one thing I hate is strings that go all bouncy on me under my plucking fingers. For example, the DR Sunbeams 45-105 were a little too loose for my taste.
     
    lloganbracee likes this.
  5. lloganbracee likes this.
  6. I've been told (and have no reason not to believe) that it is very easy to make a stiff unyielding string. It is also easy to make a stringset that is unbalanced in string-to-string volume and tone.

    Good sounding and playing stringsets will exhibit good string-to-string balance of: volume; tone, playing feel, and flexibility. GHS calls themselves "The String Experts" and it's easy to see why. Just play some of their sets. Plus they have a bass string tension guide that comes in handy.

    If you're a really aggressive player, GHS Bass Boomers have withstood the test of time and are never a bad choice. You can attack them viciously with a heavy pick = no problem. They just laugh at your fingers (unless you're the 'Man of Steel' of course).
     
    lloganbracee likes this.
  7. lloganbracee

    lloganbracee

    Sep 9, 2017
    Stefan Verbeeck and Linnin like this.
  8. I've never played that set, but have toyed with trying it out. I do know that they are commonly chosen for drop tuning. GHS uses a slightly heavier hex core than their competition. It makes a difference you can feel and hear. They used to have a set called 'Big Core Bass' with an even heavier core. Now discontinued.
     
    lloganbracee likes this.
  9. No mention of DR Lo Riders?

    They're very high tension (hence the name indicating they can have low action), and have a nice peak in the upper mids which make them growly by nature. They're also very smooth to the touch as they've been lightly compressed, which also gives them extra longevity. I prefer the Stainless Steels for a little extra brightness, but the nickels are good too.

    They're my favourite round, hands down.
     
    BrentSimons, JaseyT, scuzzy and 3 others like this.
  10. Coolhandjjl

    Coolhandjjl Supporting Member

    Oct 13, 2010
    Appleton
    Roto 77s and Pryamid Golds are great strings that happen to have the feel of high tension. Where they fall on the actual lbs/ft tension scale is not known to me
     
    BrentSimons and lloganbracee like this.
  11. Jewce

    Jewce

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    Optima Unique Golds. The Hartke SSX ain't bad either.
     
    lloganbracee likes this.
  12. dave64o

    dave64o Talkbass Top 10 all time lowest talent/gear ratio! Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 15, 2000
    Southern NJ
    If I had seen this thread before you did, then I definitely would have mentioned Lo Riders! I'll still mention them, though I prefer the nickels. I'll periodically try other strings just to see what's out there and compare but, so far, my favorite string has remained Lo Riders for both the stiff feel and for the great sound.

    That being said, I've been enjoying flats more frequently and currently have three different sets on my basses. I've used Chromes before on my Precision V and currently have them on my L-2500. Love the tone (brighter than most flats, some growl in the mids if you want it) and they're definitely a firm-feeling string. I love them, both for the tone and the feel. I currently have LaBella Deep Talkin' Flats on my Precision V. They're a much more traditional sounding flat that's nothing like the Chromes but I'd also say they're solely deep, thuddy, and thumpy, as I expected from posts I've read here. There's still some mids and highs in them but I still really like how they sound. I think their feel is relatively stiff, but not quite as stiff as the Lo Riders and the Chromes. And, just yesterday, I put a set of EB Cobalt Flats on my Stingray 5HH. I haven't had much opportunity to play them but I hope to give it a good test tonight. My initial impression is that they didn't feel as stiff as the Chromes but I'll see when I have an opportunity to play them for a while, hopefully tonight.

    I also like Ken Smith Burners a lot, though I don't think they feel quite as stiff as Lo Riders. But they feel pretty good and I got great sound out of them on my FrankenJazz and on my Tobias Toby Pro.

    Rotosound 77's have been on my list of strings to try, but I just haven't gotten to them yet. I was thinking they might go on my Precision once I'm done with the LaBella DTFs, but those strings will probably last a lot of years so I'm not sure when I'll actually get to the Rotos.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
    lloganbracee and Matthew_84 like this.
  13. mattj1stc

    mattj1stc Gold Supporting Member

    Jan 13, 2009
    Dallas, TX USA
    For 4 string basses, I'd go with the LaBella Jamesons or the Roto Steve Harris sets. I use the Roto77s (135-105-85-65-45) on my 5 string.
     
    lloganbracee and slagheap like this.
  14. micguy

    micguy

    May 17, 2011
    I play 50-70-95 sets too, but then....I need a G string. Maybe I should ship whatever strings I don't like to some of you guys, as I have carpal tunel issues, so I play really light strings. Latest thing that I used to like, that's just not my cup of tea anymore is Pressurewounds - used to use them on my fretless, but I tried some Round core boomers recently on my fretless, and...not going back.
     
  15. BlueShox

    BlueShox Registered Turtle

    Jul 14, 2007
    Lexington, SC
    I used Rotosound 77s for most of my career, than switched to Chromes about a year ago. No plans on making another change anytime soon; the Chromes have great tension, balanced sound, are very quiet on the frets, and I can get my action extremely low.
     
    lloganbracee likes this.
  16. keto

    keto Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2016
    Edmonton
    Is this a club? Yeah, I'm a digging in pick player hack, and I like a lot of resistance. Can't have the strings flopping around making off key noises when slammed, or not being in place for fast picking runs. I use primarily DR LoRider nickels. The 'regular' 105 Bass Boomer set was probably the highest perceived resistance (is that what you mean by tension?) that I've used, maybe Chromes which I used a lot a couple years back.
     
    scuzzy likes this.
  17. dave64o

    dave64o Talkbass Top 10 all time lowest talent/gear ratio! Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 15, 2000
    Southern NJ
    Adding to my previous post ....

    I had a set of GHS Pressurewounds on my Stingray for about two months (maybe?) before I put the Cobalt Flats on it but didn't think at first that they were stiff enough for me. But I hadn't been playing much for a while and my technique got pretty heavy-handed at that time. I also just joined a new band and suddenly stated playing a lot more so my touch quickly got back to normal. So I tried the Stingray/Pressurewounds again and this time the strings felt better. I wasn't getting as much rattle and they didn't feel as floppy. I still put the Cobalt Flats on anyway because I thought they'd be a better fit in this group, but I purposely kept the Pressurewounds so I can give them a second chance after I see what I think about the Cobalt Flats. Maybe the Pressurewounds do have a stiffer feel than I initially thought?
     
  18. pacojas

    pacojas "FYYA BUN"

    Oct 11, 2009
    MEXICANADAMERICA
    (chem):mad: this thread is 100% illuminati confirmation. they want us to discuss string tensions while they trick the masses with NWO schemes and corruption. show me a lawyer who tells the truth and don’t bore me with talk of strings and tension.
    you want tension,.. :dead:(trails)
    :help:

    :whistle:
     
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