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high tension?!

Discussion in 'Strings [DB]' started by darksail, Aug 25, 2004.


  1. darksail

    darksail

    Aug 13, 2004
    Firenze, Italy
    I always had a problem on my d.bass. Let me try to explain...
    Well , my strings are too strong, the tension seems to be too high. I really have to strongly "push down" the fingers to reach the keyboard. I've tried to move a bit "up and down" the bridge but the things did not change too much.
    At the beginning all was natural to me... then I played some other d.basses and I constantly found the strings more and more light , easy to play...
    -so, maybe it's just a problem of type of strings?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated... my thanks in adv.
     
  2. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Two folks that I would see are a luthier and a teacher.
     
  3. darksail

    darksail

    Aug 13, 2004
    Firenze, Italy
    Ok Ray,
    but a luthier worked on my bass (maybe he's not a good liuther... but usually he's ok ) and I have a teacher since years.

    I was trying to understand if this could be a technical problem of my bass , a problem of construction, or if this is a problem of tension of strings and if someone maybe had the same problem.
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    It could be strings, bass, setup, or a combination of the three. If the nut or the action too high, it can make your left hand feel tense. Strings can certainly also be a factor. Let's start there - what kind of strings are you using, and what's the mensure (length between the nut and bridge) of your bass?
     
  5. darksail

    darksail

    Aug 13, 2004
    Firenze, Italy
    Nut and action are not high...
    Maybe I did not explain the things clearly: The strings are not high, on the contrary I think that they are down enough (I worked with that...ok).
    But they are just more "hard" than all others basses I played (also considering some "basic" d.bass with strings very HIGH and really not playable too), I don't know , but the strings on my bass seem to have a higher tension...

    I'm using G and D Pirastro Eudoxa and a couple of anonymous A and E Super sensitive Red label.

    the mensure (I think it's what I call "diapason length") is
    Cm. 111,5 , so 44 Inch. (yes , it's a big bass ;) )
     
  6. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Bingo!
     
  7. AMJBASS

    AMJBASS Supporting Member

    Jan 8, 2002
    Ontario, Canada
    Longer string length = more tension. I would recommend you get solo strings, and tune them to orchestra pitch. Obligatos are great for this while mainting enough tension to give you a good Pizz. If you don't mind spending the extra bread, try the new Compas 180s.
     
  8. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002

    do what AJ suggests or just get some Velvets- they seem to always be low tension for me.

    I'm using Obligato solo's.
     
  9. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    sorry, didn't see that you recommended the velvets adrian !
     
  10. AMJBASS

    AMJBASS Supporting Member

    Jan 8, 2002
    Ontario, Canada
    Great minds think alike;)
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Also, some strings are available in 4/4 lengths, and some are not. If you can find strings that were made for that mensure, I bet the results will be more to your liking. With any luck, Francois - our resident string lunatic - will show up before too long and set us all straight. :)
     
  12. Few bass strings are made in true 4/4 lenghts; some Thomastiks, Jargars, some Corellis. Pirastros are more 7/8 but fit a 4/4.
    You need to browse the makers website to know exactly what's available.
    Some on-line dealers catalogs are misleading in this aspect.
    His best bet, as suggested, could be to get solo strings and tune them at orchestra pitch, to get low tension.
     
  13. darksail

    darksail

    Aug 13, 2004
    Firenze, Italy
    Thanks to all.
    So, First of all I have to find strings that I like and that in true 4/4 lenghts... and the thing doesn't appear so easy... (site of Corelli for example is not very useful) :meh:
     
  14. Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

    May 15, 2001
    Phx, AZ..USA
    Don't the velvet strings come in 4/4 lengths?
     
  15. Did you look here?: http://www.savarez.fr/corel-contrebas.html
    Very informative, although in french. (english page still under construction)
    As for Velvet strings, I know very little about them, and their website doesn't tell much either.
    Furthermore they're sold in sets only, and quite expensive, so I never (and probably won't never) test them.
     
  16. Mudfuzz

    Mudfuzz

    Apr 3, 2004
    WA...
  17. Thanks for the link, Aaron.
    However, US$100 for a single string (Compas 180) is still a bit too much for me...
    And I thought Olivs and Eudoxas were expensive... :(
     
  18. AMJBASS

    AMJBASS Supporting Member

    Jan 8, 2002
    Ontario, Canada
    Luscomb here in Ontario is very expensive. You are much better off ordering your strings from Quinn Violins, or Lemur Music.
     
  19. Unfortunately they don't sell Velvets in singles!
     
  20. AMJBASS

    AMJBASS Supporting Member

    Jan 8, 2002
    Ontario, Canada
    I don't know if Luscomb actually sells singles...I was under the impression that Velvet would only sell their strings as a set. That way the tension across stays uniform. That is part of the reason they respond the way they do.