Hipshot bass xtenders

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by rhythm, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Yes

    66 vote(s)
  2. No

    27 vote(s)
  1. rhythm


    Dec 4, 2005

    Was reading about these. Are they a great advantage? Easy to use? Where I was reading from, a very experienced bassist and musician, was saying that he now is able to use a 4 string instead of a 5 string.


    All in all, would it be worth paying a bit extra and having them fitted to a bass?

  2. their main advantage is that you can immediately drop to a lower note w/ out retuning. Then at the flick of a switch go back to the original note.
    yes they are easy to use, pretty much set an forget.
    As for are they worth it, it all depends, if you play multiple songs in both drop D and regular EADG tuning then sure, but if you have 1 song a nite where you play drop D, it might be cost effective to detune. I have em on my basses, but only use them 2x nite- if that. If you drop lower than D, I find the string becomes too floppy and the open string tends to be flat. So its a compromise
  3. My eldest son is currently studying bass at the Bass Institute in London. He plays a Stingray 5 as well as a 4 string Jazz. He really feels at home with the Jazz and regards it as his main bass. However, he missed the flexibility of the 5 string. I fitted an 'xtender to the Jazz and the Stingray now hardly gets played apart from when he really needs to get down low.
  4. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    Hipshot Xtenders are excellent devices, I put 'em on my fours for well over a decade. If you don't want to move up to five string, they are definitely worth installing on your fours IMHO.

    Note: Xtenders are no substitute for five string... that's why I now play five string exclusively. But if you just need the occasional low note, it's probably better to go with a Hipshot.
  5. adouglas


    Jun 23, 2003
    Bridgeport, CT


    A 5 string lets you do many things. A Hipshot lets you do just one thing. I use my 5 to transpose songs and play patterns in places on the neck that are not possible on a 4 string.

    Hipshots work, they're well made, they're simple...but they're also a one-trick pony.

    My point here is that the Hipshot will LIMIT you in the same way that detuning will. You may only need the occasional low note, but if you suddenly have more possibilities available, you may discover that you have uses for them that you didn't know you had.
  6. deaf pea

    deaf pea

    Mar 24, 2005
    Cuernavaca 1 hr S Mexico City
    Seymour Duncan/Basslines SMB-5A Endorsing Artist
    I play 99% 5-string now and have hipshot extenders on ALL my basses . . . 4-stringer AND 5-stringers. And yes. I use them, and not just for the ocasional low note.
  7. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    As others have said, "+1" on the general thought that it's a great tool for some limited/specific applications, but is no way even close to a replacement for a 5.

    If all you need is extended range (as your post seems to indicate), then the detuner is limited, and somewhat inconvenient ('cause you have to change your thinking to use one), but inexpensive, as you don't have to get a whole new bass.

    However, if readily accessible alternate tunings is your goal (which I don't think you're talking about, but for the sake of completeness) detuner technology is the only way to go (i.e. Manring's hyperbass).
  8. bass_man86


    Apr 29, 2002
    Virginia Beach
    For me, they are pointless. A five string bass makes more sense; not only do I get a few more notes with my fives, but since I use 35" scale basses, I don't end up a with floppy E string either. :D
  9. Mudfuzz


    Apr 3, 2004
    I have one on one of my basses, and I find it useful from time to time for drop D and also as a impromptu whammy bar on the E [think John Entwistle]. My only complaint is the on basses with those big fender style tuning keys you can get a lot of neck-dive.
  10. Or you can use a d-tuner on a 5-string's B and go down to A ;)
  11. dcr

    dcr Supporting Member

    Until very recently, I've always kept a Hipshot on one of my four-strings and on one of my five-strings. Now, only on one of my five-strings.

    I love 'em! Not hard to use at all, once you learn how to set it up and properly tune with one. As others have said, not a substitute for a 5er, but a useful tool in certain contexts nonetheless.

    Highly recommended.

  12. It makes sense when playing in a cover band. Some songs are written in drop 'D' & it's a bit much to try & learn one on a five string.....most folks I know wind up tuning their E doen to a D even on their 5 stringers.
  13. tplyons


    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    They are a NECESSITY for me, I can't stand the asymmetry of 5 string necks, just four and six seem natural to me. And for the low D you can't beat the flip of a switch. It really allows you to approach each song a little bit differently, the execution is flawless and frankly, every one of my basses has them.
  14. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Now this is interesting as heck. I've NEVER heard this one before. I don't wanna' derail, so I'll just leave it at: 4's and 5's are easy for me, but I'm still trying to acclimate to a 6. :)
  15. lets remember u can but a hipshot on a 5/6+ string too, I atcually know a guy who has one on his low B on his 6 string, and actually uses it to tune UP to C so he can get an open C ;)
  16. MikeBass

    MikeBass Supporting Member

    Nov 4, 2003
    Ferndale MI.
    Artist: Xotic Basses/AccuGroove
    It's hard for me to own a 4 string without one.
    It's the first thing I do when I get a 4 string is to slpa a HipShot on it.
    I've become so accustomed to having one, I can play just about as easy when dropped down to the low D as I can when in normal tunning.
    A must have on a 4 string IMO.
  17. Cool stuff man - I'm doing the Vocal Institute so I may actually know him.