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hitting the studio

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by rexspangle, Aug 31, 2001.


  1. our band is going to finally record are 1st CD. We have the studio selected we are going to.
    As far as the equipment he has I don't know we were recommended by a few people and he is a friend of a friends so we can get a very decent price. What I do know is it is a reasonably high quality studio.


    Well here is what I am wondering since I have really only recorded on a 4-track and I have never been to a real studio.

    Any specific things you'd suggest? I know it is a vague question but any simple tips would help.


    Also as far as copy-writing, album design, making duplicates etc.. what do you suggest?

    I am quite capable of doing the computer layout and design but I am also considering finding a graphic design company. any suggestions?


    Oh yeah how do ya do it cheap but professional?

    well what ever you know would be great help

    thanx
     
  2. tip : do the recording in a studio, but do the mixing yourself. producers are VERY expensive, and with something like the program Cooledit professonal, you can get pretty much the same results, at a fraction of the cost ( plus you get the sound exactly the way YOU want it.. not the way the producer thinks it sounds best )

    the recording is nothing special.. you just plug your stuff in, get a headphone ( monitor of the recording ), and play your songs a couple of times... the drummer and singer are usually in a seperate cabinets, for clear recording.. but the bass / guitar are recorded from line.. but it varies per studio..
     
  3. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    off to MISCELLANEOUS
     
  4. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    You make it sound so easy there. Mixing is equal parts science and art, nothing you as a newbie can do very well. Listening through headphones is not a very good solution either. Of course, if demo quality is all you want to achieve, by all means, mix it yourselves - with a little work it will at least sound halfway decent. But I suggest that a pro should do it, to bring out the magic in a mix an untrained mixman can't. And your band should be the producer (no need to hire one of those, only use the engineer of the studio).
     
  5. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Bring extra everything. Strings, picks, drummers, whatever.

    Show up on time or early, and see if you can set up drums and amps BEFORE your paid time starts.

    Try to settle disputes as simply and quickly as possible. Egos flare when recording, so be prepared to make quick compromises to make everyone happy.
     
  6. I like how you say drummerS. you know bring a few extras, one of em' gets ya mad tell him to go home and use another........next
     
  7. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I am quite capable of doing the computer layout and design but I am also considering finding a graphic design company. any suggestions? Also as far as copy-writing, album design, making duplicates etc.. what do you suggest?

    theres a company I used to work for in Herndon, Virginia, its called Digital Press its not a graphic design company, but it is a cd-rom duplication company,

    Dennis is the graphic arts guy there, and he does great work. He can either come up with a design or work off a pre-existing one you have.

    The company itself duplicates CD-rom's, applies thermal image transfers to the cd's, makes the cd sleeves, jewel cases, etc. They do really good work. They service the entire DC metro area, Maryland, have government contracts, GTE was a client when I was there, and even ship software to other countries and states. They have a quick turn around time too. Just tell them when you need them by and they will have it to you by the date specified.

    They didnt normally do music cd's when i was there, but then again i dont think many ppl came in asking to have those done. I think Fred (the owner) would be willing to do it though. if your interested, and when the time is right, I can give you thier # and who to specifically ask for.
     
  8. that sounds great thanx :)
     
  9. Murf

    Murf

    Mar 28, 2001
    Ireland
    Whoa, there are 2 ways to approach this the cheapest way is to buy a CD labeling pack like the ones here www.neato.com they're reasonably cheap and you get a bit of software to help you layout your graphics, this solution is ideal if your going to burn cds yourself as you can print off cd labels from a standard printer...obviously the quality is never going to be as good as a professional printers and it'll be a pain in the arse sticking labels and jewel case inserts into a few hundred cd cases but then its a cheap hard and fast method.

    The second way is, most mastering studios have a cd labelling service which they generally include in the price of the mastering (if you want it) however if you want to use your own artwork you have to prep it yourself and believe me if your not a trained graphic designer (in print not web) its a nightmare,

    Heres a typical CD booklet & backliner spec:

    Layouts on disk:
    Design must be laid out in Quark/photoshop/illustrator,

    All images should be at a resolution of 300dpi,

    Color modes must be CYMK (not RGB)

    If barcode required, leave a white picture box 36mm x 20mm

    File type should be eps or tiff not jpeg.

    Include all fonts used

    'Collect for output' (illustrator)' before sending in finished design.

    Also bear in mind if you use any photographs (which are not your own such as a background image whatever)YOU HAVE TO PAY FOR THE LICENSE to use them which at 300 dpi will probably cost you about $300/400.

    I'd suggest give your artwork to a professional Graphic designer or printer and let them prep your layout for you (they'd have experience in this and believe me it'll save you headaches in the long run)
    Then again if its just a demo your doing you dont really need this level of quality it could get very..very expensive.

    Hope this helps
     
  10. thanx murf that is very helpful :) you must have been at our band meeting last night cause you answered some of our questions!!

    thanx