Holy tone, Batman

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Mongeaux, May 29, 2004.

  1. Mongeaux


    Apr 14, 2004
    When I switched over from guitar to bass in 2000 I really didnt know much about good bass tone. I remember picking up a P bass abd then not even plugging it in as the neck felt huge at the time. I ended up with a Jazz bass since it had the smallest neck of the basses I tried.

    Well for four years I have been tring to get the right tone but never can seem to get it.

    Then today I picked up a P bass :bassist:

    BAM! there it was. The tone I have looking for. Even tho it was a MIM bass thru a peavy amp I could still hear the sound.

    The neck didnt even seem to big for me now. Of course I took lessons on an upright for a year so I guess nothing feels big now haha.

    Anyway, I have ordered a US Hwy 1 PBass.

    I guess the old formulas still work.

    Pbass + ampeg + flat strings = Badass tone.
  2. Dan Molina

    Dan Molina TalkBass Secular Progressive

    Jul 17, 2002
    Murr Town, California
    so you ordered an MIM that was shipped accross the boreder to be assembled, thus costs more.

    sorry I have a hatred for highway basses, I think it's Fenders worst idea ever.

    but congrats!
  3. Yeah, a decent P-bass just has that tone. Congrats on finding it! Took me 2 years to find mine.
  4. Mongeaux


    Apr 14, 2004

    ***, Fender is passing off MIM basses as MIA? I'm going to be really PO'ed if I find out the only difference between a MIM and the Hwy 1 is the paint job. If it is I will just cancel the order and get a MIM bass and save that $250.

    Got any links going more into this?
  5. TaySte_2000


    Jun 23, 2001
    Manchester, UK
    Endorsing Artist: Mojohand, Subdecay, Overwater, Matamp
    From my understanding with all these company's such as lakland and G&L taking american parts and having them assembled in cheaper countries fender wnet the other way taking cheap MIM parts and assembling them in America.

    The paint job is different as well.

    Its funny really cos I think fender have really shot themselves in the foot here but as long as no one knows its mexican parts assembled in america people just think there getting a cheap american fender which is not the case.

    I'd got for the mexi fender I think there great mines is my second fav bass (after my ric of course).

    With the money you save you can have a few mods done on it like a badassII bridge maybe even new pickups.

    Hope this helps
  6. Mongeaux


    Apr 14, 2004

    You make an good point. I could buy the MIM and get a new pickup. That should work fine untill I can finish school at the end of summer. After that I can get a job that will allow me to buy a nice nice $1000 plus bass. After all, the only gigs I'm playing on atm are open jam sessions at the local blues bar.
  7. Blademaster Dez

    Blademaster Dez

    May 12, 2004
    Fender issues aside, congratulations on finding "that" tone. We all have our own personal holy grails of "that" tone we quest for (oftentimes over a lifetime), so it's nice to hear when someone has found theirs.
  8. Mongeaux


    Apr 14, 2004

    Hey thx, it hit me like a ton of bricks. Now I just have to get one home! I returned several items to Musicians Friend and they still have not credited my cash back. Jeez they got the stuff back last thursday, how long does it take. I'm ready to get another bass already :hyper:

    Btw. I spent hrs today going to several bass forums and reading about Highway 1 basses. Seems there are two schools of thought. Either people love them or hate them with a passion. Many posters commented on the light weight of the instrument and its long sustain. The posters who hate it seems to talk mostly about the finish and the fact that some of its parts are mim. In any case it was an intesting study, lots of controversy surrounding this bass.
  9. BruceWane


    Oct 31, 2002
    Houston, TX
    Somebody call me? :)

    NEVER deny the power of the P.

    Just saw A Perfect Circle last night. Jordie White played the whole show on a P bass. Fantastic tone. EXCELLENT show.

    I've always found the P tone to be very.....tribal sounding. It's a very percussive and resonant tone. Makes me think of somebody beating on a timpani, or a giant tunable log.

    There's some things that it's not appropriate for, but I really think it's been overlooked for a lot of years while people searched for the perfect J-bass growl and/or more modern tones. Something new and different always has an attraction, but once the newness wears off, you evaluate it on it's merits. And it's damn hard to beat the sound of a good P. It ALWAYS finds it's place in the mix.

    And....I am very pleased to report that my newly acquired Dingwall AB I does a P tone in spades. There was a damaged switch in it which I had to replace. Once that was done, I was playing it, trying out all the different combinations of the multi-switch. Set it on neck pickup soled, and think "that sounds really great............wait a dang minute.....I've heard that before".........go and get my '77 P and plug it in......it's so similar it's eerie. Almost EXACTLY the same. I mean, it sounds more like my P than some other P's do.....it's that close. It's so small a difference that, with your eyes closed, you'd think it was just the variation you get from one piece of alder to another. VERY cool.
  10. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    I love the classic P-bass-through-SVT tone. Mostly I play active instruments, for several reasons (tone controls right on the instrument, and the ability to run long cables without picking up hum and other interference). But lately I've been looking for a 5-string P bass, and they're surprisingly hard to find. Fender's 5-string P "isn't", it doesn't have that characteristic P bass tone (or at least it's not immediately obvious how to dial it up). The ones I found and like are the Mike Lull P5, and the Celinder Classic. Both of those are very nice instruments. Of course there are many more choices for the traditional 4 string version. I'd choose the Antiquity pickups over Celinder's own though, their active preamp also doesn't sound very much like a real P-bass. But I fully agree, the classic P bass tone is instantly recognizable, it's on thousands of hit records we all know and love, and it's pretty much what I grew up with from age 6 to about 20 (when I discovered that there were other brands besides Fender). I haven't owned a Fender in many moons (except for my one J bass that I pull out of the closet for jazz gigs), but lately have been in need of the P sound for a classic rock cover band we're starting. If you want that sound, there's not much else out there that will deliver it except a real P.