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Home Recording Set up

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by slapmachine, Jan 25, 2012.


  1. slapmachine

    slapmachine

    Oct 4, 2010
    PV, Kansas
    Hey guys, I know this is going to be like many of the other home recording threads that are currently filling the subforum of Recording Gear and Equipment, but I honestly wanted to get more than what I could find, so please do not reference other threads unless they hold specific relevance to what I'm asking!

    I want to basically make a home recording setup that allows me to record something like bass or even drums. So inputs is something that I'm slightly concerned about. In saying that I would also like very straighforward effective software recommendations that don't require a translator because it's all encrypted and hard to find. I'm trying to get a killer setup and I'd love to save money when I can, but not sacrificing quality. If it's going to crap out but save me money, please let me know, I'd much rather save up!!

    I like to keep a clean and simplistic setup concerning electronics when I can, so the simpler set-up that really gets the job done seamlessly, please let me know.

    If I didn't specify a something, please let me know I'll be happy to help you help me get closer to my ideal situation!

    Best regards,

    Brooks


    P.S. thanks for helping me in advance~! :bassist:
     
  2. DuraMorte

    DuraMorte

    Mar 3, 2011
    Do you have a computer?
    If not, build one.
    If so, Mac or Windoze? Specs?

    As far as audio interfaces go, I'm personally looking at upgrading to a MOTU 896mk3. The onboard effects look killer, it can be expanded to 24 simultaneous ins and outs, for full band recording in near-realtime, etc. etc.

    You'll also need mics, monitors, some sound deadening, a good chair, a good sturdy desk, and possibly some speaker stands.

    Also, asking for good, straightforward recording software is a bit like finding a perfect woman: impossible.
    If you want good, you have to learn all the ins and outs. If you want straightforward, you will have to deal with substantial limitations; TANSTAAFL.
     
  3. slapmachine

    slapmachine

    Oct 4, 2010
    PV, Kansas
    Yes, it's a laptop sadly =/.

    64bit windows 7 home premium
    Intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU M 380 @ 2.53GHz
    4.00 GB ram
    Intel(R) HD Graphics
    1696 MB Total available graphics memory
    356GB Free (583GB Total)

    As far as anything else I have. I have a bose speaker system for my computer, an Audix D6 mic, Two Sennheiser e835's, and a small behringer mixer.

    Best regards,

    Brooks
     
  4. corsa

    corsa Supporting Member

    Jul 12, 2010
    Fort Wright, KY
    Well, I'm not an expert and I didn't even stay in a Holiday Inn last night but I have recently waded into home recording and would be happy to share the decisions I've made so far.

    I'm assuming you have a computer that you intend to use. As always, more RAM and more processing power is better. I bought a factory refurbished Gateway with 4GB and a quad core AMD processor and it has done everything I've asked of it so far.

    I was also interested in a good number of inputs and settled on the Tascam US-1800. It has 8 XLRs and two instrument/line inputs on the front with an additional 4 line-ins on the back along with MIDI in and out and digital in and out. In addition it has monitor outs, 4 line outs and a headphone out. I couldn't find anything else comparable for close to the same money. I'm sure the mic pre-amps aren't as nice as you'd get in a Focusrite for example but for where I am in the home recording adventure, they're perfectly acceptable. The drivers loaded and the hardware installed without incident and I have not had a single hiccup from this interface so far. However, I've only had it a couple of months so I can't really comment on long term reliability.

    I chose Reaper for my DAW software. It is a free 30 day trial of the full product not crippled in any way. If you like it, after 30 days, they ask you to register though the demo doesn't expire. A non-commercial license is $60.00. They have good documentation and an active user community and forums. I happily paid my 60 bucks.

    That is my simple set-up that is working well for me so far. I don't want to write a book here so I'll stop now but let me know if you want more specifics or have questions etc.

    Hope this helped.

    Jon
     

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