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How do I fix a serious neck "ding"?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by peabody, Apr 30, 2004.


  1. peabody

    peabody

    Oct 31, 2002
    La Crosse, WI
    I just received a '75 Jazz today from an on-line dealer in TN. While the natural finish looks like a 30 year old bass, I can live with that. My issue is there are a couple of major dings on the back of the neck that are deep enough to bother me when I play. How do I fix those without making it worse? While I don't like the dents, a big glob of glue sticking out is going to be worse. Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!
     
  2. HannibalSpector

    HannibalSpector

    Mar 27, 2002
    Australia
    Try the iron and damp cloth trick first.
    Place a damp cloth over the ding , heat up an iron and run the iron over the cloth , don't hold the iron on too long. This swells the indented timber back to the surface ,it may work.
    Plan B.
    Neatly fit a graving piece. Cut a small slither of identical timber the shape of a diamond which covers the ding. Make the edges straight with either a plane or sanding board/file , this is a graving piece or 'gravo' which is then fitted into the damaged neck or body etc with a scalpel , sharp chisel or stanley knife. The sharper the tools the better. Glue the gravo in with joinery glue (not epoxy) and fair the repair up. If the repair is noticeable there are a few tricks you can do with the finish to hide it.
    Best of luck
     
  3. Same as above... great solution...for my more isolated places use a soildering iron (as recomended on the Warwick 101 Bass Survival section)..

    The wood will rase about the normal grain...allow to dry for a good couple of hours ..sand down to the normal level and then either wax or re-paint..

    If you bass if painted..then the matchin of a colour can prove to be difficult..

    For small but high impact dings these can be often filled and re-coated...