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how do semi-acoustic/semi-hollow basses work?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by anonymous278347457, Oct 28, 2006.


  1. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    Ive done some searching and everyone seems to make semi-hollow/semi-acoustics differently


    basically, Is the body 2-layered, where you cut out 2 pieces of wood to the body shape, one thicker than the other and route out the thicker piece of wood. and then glue the two together and maybe put some F-holes in?


    OR is it 3 layered, where the middle pieces is routed all the way through and 1 piece is glued on each side?


    also, Are F-holes essential? or are they just for looks?

    also also, does anyone have a build diary of a semi-acoustic?


    thanks,


    Joe
     
  2. fish man

    fish man

    Nov 14, 2005
    Ontario, Canada
    You can build either way.

    3-section building saves you from having to be too careful with the depth, but 2-section is simpler.

    f-holes aren't necessary, but do make it louder.
     
  3. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    You're talking 2 very different animals. Semi-acoustic are much more acoustic than semi. It's build practiaclly as an acoustic, but with a centerstock.

    Hollow basses can be built in two principal ways:
    core with routed recesses and capped on front or back
    core with cutouts and capped on both front and back

    For real knowledge, I recommend Martin Koch's book.

    F-holes are not necessary, but adds to the tone. Especially the unamplified tone, of course. Amped, the difference is minor, but without holes, it might sound a little more compressed, or enclosed.
     
  4. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    so a ibanez artcore or a epiphone jack casedy would be which kind?


    also, which kind is easier to build?
     
  5. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Artcore and Jack cassidy are hollow bodie electrics. These are built on the premise of a jazz guitar e.g. Joe Pass epi, Es-335, D'angelico etc.
    These lean more toward the Acoustic side. A semi hollow will be essentially easier to build, but it comes down to the sound you are craving.
     
  6. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Ehm... I don't know Iba Artcore, but the Jack Cassidy is definitely a semi-acoustic. A rather intricate, archtop one, too. A simpler example, flattop and simpler materials, but nice sound, is Danelectro.

    As a matter of fact, I haven't heard of any series production, hollowbody bass... Feel free to enlighten me!
     
  7. MPU

    MPU

    Sep 21, 2004
    Valkeala Finland
    Rob Allen basses are hollowbodies.
    Marko
     
  8. The answer is....yes.

    There are more ways to build a semi-hollow than there are to build either a solid body or a fully-acoustic instrument. Do some homework and follow the direction that inspires you and is at, or just beyond, your skill level.
     
  9. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon

    May 10, 2000
    Redmond, WA
    Amazon Product Designer
  10. MPU

    MPU

    Sep 21, 2004
    Valkeala Finland
    In my mind semi-hollow = chambered.
    Marko
     
  11. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon

    May 10, 2000
    Redmond, WA
    Amazon Product Designer
    sorry, wasn't meaning to mince words.

    just chiming in with excitement.

    f
     
  12. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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