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How do you pronounce the names "João and Astrud Gilberto"?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by rabid_granny, Mar 3, 2003.


  1. I've always wanted to explain who I've been listening to lately but I don't have a clue how to pronounce their names. Help?
     
  2. "Astrud" is just "ah-STROOD," "Joao" is very similar to "Jean" in French but with an "O" sound instead of "ah," and "Gilberto" sounds like it looks except that the G is soft.

    (I had a Brazilian friend of mine explain this very thing once.)
     
  3. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    No Português: Gilberto = zheel-BEART-oo

    That's about the best I can describe it phonetically. ;)
     
  4. "Ah-strood"
    "Jzh-oe"
    "Zheel-berto"

    Gotcha. And I'm guessing that "Bebel" is "Beh-bel", right?
     
  5. Nah, it's more like "Jzh-ohn."
     
  6. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Jo-hao, with the ''a'' sounding more like the ''u'' in ''huh?''.

    Astrud:

    In Brazil we say ''ash-troodg''

    Man, that's hard and I speak Portuguese!

    incidentally, he's coming to play here in june. I'm so there.:D
     
  7. Is the last "o" silent in João?
     
  8. I yield to my Brazilian brother :D

    Do pronunciations vary greatly among different social/ethnic groups? The guy who told me those is Chinese-Brazilian, and fairly wealthy.
     
  9. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    It's a diphthong--two vowels together that make a particular syllable. In this case, "ão" makes sort of a ah-ohn sound (except the "ah" and "oh" sounds are fused together), where "n" is a sort of short nasal "n" sound like at the end of the French word non. The same diphthong is in words and names like São Paulo or São Miguel.
     
  10. I don't know how to pronounce those names either. :(
     
  11. São is the Portuguese word for "saint," and is fairly similar to "San" in Spanish--but with that wicked dipthong.
     
  12. Molloy

    Molloy

    Dec 6, 2002
    Paris, France
    Actually, it's not the French "non" but rather "Lentement". In English, that would be halfway between the final diphthong in "coolant" and "stomp" (this one being the closest to "non"), while making it completely nasal. Let's note this diphthong "an".

    In Portuguese, "João" can be pronounced in a lot of different ways dependng on the geographical accent. A Lisbon Portuguese would say a rasp "dJoAN", with a very very slight glimpse of the middle "o"; while a southern Brazilian would make the middle "o" much more present and may even evoke the final "o", and soften the attack on the "J" : "Jz" rather than "dJ".

    Astrud : this time, differences over the pronuncaition of the "s". Portuguese way : rasp "SH", Brazilian way a much softer ss-sh mix.

    Gilberto : Portuguese way, rasp "dJiel", Brazilian way, soft "dZheel".

    Overall, "r" are rolling with the tongue high in the palate in Portugal, while in Brazil they are closer to the eluded Spanish "r" or even the "r/l" Japanese thingy.

    Portugal Portuguese (esp. Lisbon) sounds rather harsh, as you can tell, it is very different from the Brazilian accent.
     
  13. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Unlike the USA, the language in Brazil varies primarily by social strata and regionalism. The obvious exceptions are families whose close ancestors were immigrants. In this case, accents vary by national origin.

    Still, it's nothing like the variations you get here. It's like two (or more) different countries. Not that it's a bad thing, just different.
     
  14. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    [​IMG]

    Oh, look, I've gone crosseyed.

    Not bad, though.
     
  15. Do you know how it is pronounced in North America?
     
  16. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    That's a better explanation than anything I could come up with! Thanks.
     
  17. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but, I believe if you go to a language school and inquire about studying Portuguese, they'll ask you if you want to study Old World (Lisbon) or New World (Brazilian) Portuguese. The New World contains many words* that aren't even in the Old World version, along with many different accents. As varied I believe as Received Standard British is from Cockney and U.S. Southern English.

    Mike
    * Many are from the Indigenous Indians to Brazil along with Bantu and Swahili.
     
  18. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Hey, Michael.

    The old world Portuguese would probably encompass all of Portugal.:p

    I think it's safe to say that Brazil is the country that's making people want to learn Portuguese nowadays...
     
  19. From the posts to date my guess is - incorrectly
    ;) :D
     
  20. You really can't appreciate this until you hear it in Portuguese, but, it is absolutely beautiful when you do. The translation into English will really make you think.

    Comecar de Novo

    Comecar de novo
    E contar comigo
    Vai valer a pena
    ter amanhecido
    ter me rebelado
    ter me debatido
    ter me machucado
    ter sobrevivido
    ter vivado a mesa
    ter me conhecido
    ter vivado a barco
    ter me sucorrido

    comecar de novo
    E contar comigo
    Vai valer a pena
    ter amanhecido
    Sem as tuas garras
    Sempre tao seguras
    Sem o teu fantasma
    Sem tua moldura
    Sem tuas escoras
    Sem o teu dominio
    Sem tuas esporas
    Sem o teu fascinio

    Comecar de novo
    E contar comigo
    Vai valer a pena
    Ja ter te'esquicido

    Comecar de novo

    English

    To begin again
    And to depend on myself
    It will be worthwhile
    to have awakened,
    to have rebelled,
    to have wrestled,
    to have hurt myself,
    to have survived,
    to have turned the tables,
    to have known myself,
    to have capsized,
    to have rescued myself,

    To begin again
    And to depend on myself
    It will be worthwhile
    to have awakened
    without your claws, always so secure,
    without your ghost,
    without your frame,
    without your support,
    without your domination,
    without your spurs,
    without your fascination

    To begin again
    And to depend on myself
    It will be worthwhile
    to have already
    forgotten you

    To begin again

    This is on Jane Monheit's album, "In The Sun"
    www.jazzsingers.com/JaneMonheit/

    Mike