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How do you pronoune piezo?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Joe Nerve, Apr 27, 2005.


  1. Pye-zo

    15 vote(s)
    25.9%
  2. Pee-A-Zo

    43 vote(s)
    74.1%
  1. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses, Hipshot products
    And which is correct?
     
  2. I say pee-zo. Not sure if it's correct.

    How do you spell *pronounce*? :meh:
     
  3. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    "Pee-ay-zo," is my understanding.
     
  4. I-Love-Ratm

    I-Love-Ratm

    Feb 24, 2003
    Ya i think it's pee-ay-zo
     
  5. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses, Hipshot products
    The sales rep at Ernie Ball was saying Pye-zo.
     
  6. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
    Joe, which sales rep do you talk with?

    I'm pretty tight with Dan McPherson...if you talk to Dan, next time he answers the phone say "Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!!!"

    He'll ask if you've been talking to Gard....

    ;)

    Scott Ball is very cool too, great guys there.


    ...and oh, I believe it's pronounced "pee-ay-zoh"
     
  7. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses, Hipshot products
    Brian's the guy I was talking to. I kept saying peeayzo and he kept saying pyezo. :) I assumed he was right because I'm sure he says it a lot more often than I do. I could count the times I've said the word in public on one hand. :)

    Ohhh.... I'm so utterly confused now. Who is this piezo guy anyhow. I want to call him up and end this nonsense already!
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    If you were Italian, that 'z' would definitely be pronounced "ts" !! ;)
     
  9. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    Yeah, it's always been "pee-A-tso" to me. And every scientist/engineer I've ever met has said that to, refering to piezoelectric crystals.
     
  10. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    piezo comes from the greek 'piezein' so if anyone here has studied greek and knows the proper pronunciation of 'piezein' then they could probably clear it up with some certainty. I've always said "pee-AY-zo" myself but I very well could be wrong.

    brad cook
     
  11. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    What if you were greek?

    brad cook
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    Yes - that's how I've always heard it from engineers etc.

    I'm going to Greece on Sunday - maybe I'll ask somebody there!! ;)
     
  13. the "pie" in piezo is pronounced like the desert we know and love, and the "zo" in piezo is pronounced like, well, zoh

    So it's proper pronunciation is pye-zo.
     
  14. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    From Answers.com :

    http://www.answers.com/topic/piezoelectricity&method=6


    pi·e·zo·e·lec·tric·i·ty (pī-ē'zō-ĭ-lĕk-trĭs'ĭ-tē, -ē'lĕk-, pē-ā'zō-)
    n.

    The generation of electricity or of electric polarity in dielectric crystals subjected to mechanical stress, or the generation of stress in such crystals subjected to an applied voltage.

    pi·e'zo·e·lec'tric or pi·e'zo·e·lec'tri·cal adj.
    pi·e'zo·e·lec'tri·cal·ly adv.


    piezoelectric effect (pīē'zōĭlĕk'trĭk) , voltage produced between surfaces of a solid dielectric (nonconducting substance) when a mechanical stress is applied to it. A small current may be produced as well. The effect, discovered by Pierre Curie in 1883, is exhibited by certain crystals, e.g., quartz and Rochelle salt, and ceramic materials. When a voltage is applied across certain surfaces of a solid that exhibits the piezoelectric effect, the solid undergoes a mechanical distortion. Piezoelectric materials are used in transducers, e.g., phonograph cartridges, microphones, and strain gauges, which produce an electrical output from a mechanical input, and in earphones and ultrasonic radiators, which produce a mechanical output from an electrical input. Piezoelectric solids typically resonate within narrowly defined frequency ranges; when suitably mounted they can be used in electric circuits as components of highly selective filters or as frequency-control devices for very stable oscillators.
     
  15. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    What's your source on that? The information that Bruce presented suggests otherwise.

    BTW, I've never heard of the pie desert. Is that part of the Gobi?

    brad cook
     
  16. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    So according to that, its actually pie-EE-zo with the accent on the 2nd sylable.
     
  17. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Source please...or is it because that's just how you've always said it?

    brad cook
     
  18. Apparently my sarcasm isn't showing.

    I've just always pronounced it "pie-zo". No big thing...

    I'll go back to my corner now.

    You've never enjoyed a slice of pie Brad? Crazy. Oh, sorry, desSert... :smug:
     
  19. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    The Webster's College Dictionary that I have in front of me says it's "pee-ay-zo" or "pee-ay-so." No mention of any other pronunciations. I think I'll stick with that.

    brad cook