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How does one name a double stop?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by SuperDuck, Oct 15, 2001.


  1. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    How would I go about "naming" a double stop? I don't know if I would ever have to, but it just happened upon me and I was curious.

    For example, playing R-b3, the chord COULD be minor, diminished, or whatever, because there is no b5 or 7, etc., to specify. So, in R-b3, would it just be considered minor and left at that? Making R-3 or R-5 major, and so forth? I suppose any other supporting instrument (percussion aside) could "flesh out" the chord, but for the sake of argument let's assume I'm playing by myself.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    LUTHERVANDUCKS,

    You're on the right track. The first question you need to ask is, "why am I naming this double stop?". If it's just for your own satisfaction, you should call it whatever describes its function in the music to you best. But if you're trying to find a way to describe it in a chord chart that somebody ELSE has to decipher, I'd find a way to describe EXACTLY what I want it to be made of. If, for example, you were only playing a "power chord" (R-5th) but decided to call it a "major" for some reason, the person reading the chart would assume you meant something entirely different.

    Any chord with only two notes is really an IMPLIED chord, and can be interpreted in several ways. If you are playing the notes C and Eb, they could represent the root and third of a Cmi triad, the 3rd and 5th of an Ab major triad, and even many other chords - it all depends on what the other instruments are playing. (Admittedly, the R and 3rd is the most likely scenario). And with R-5th chords, they are really androgynous sonorities (having no 3rd or "gender"), but the context of the chord in the progression may imply a certain color; a r-5 chord built on "A" will seem minor in the context of a Cma progression because the C natural of the tonic is present in the ear at all times on a subconcious level. Similarly, an "A" R-5 chord in the key of D major will imply a major chord because of the implied sound of the leading tone. But take those chords out of context and they could go either way...

    In the end, your best bet is to notate them as exactly as you can so that you're asking for the exact sound you want.


    DURRL
     
  3. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    That is tho RuPaulian, but still a very good answer.
     
  4. Yvon

    Yvon Supporting Member

    Nov 2, 2000
    Montreal, Canada
    a double is an interval, that's it....
    a 3rd, a 5th, a 4th ect...
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    TUBESOCK,

    Thankth. Your answer was quite cheerful as well.


    Toodles!

    VICDURRL VICTORIA
     
  6. hate to throw this off topic, but chris, whats up with the mutalation with the handles calling turok into TubeSock? or Turok into BANGTHYHEADTWICE, and super duck into LUTHERVANDUCKS... just wondering, found it odd...;) :D :confused:
     
  7. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    He thinks we're doublestops and he's naming us.
     
  8. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    As usual, I can count on you guys for prompt responses. Thanks for the input everybody, especially Chris! Not that the other weren't helpful, it's just Chris' was the most detailed, and answered my question to a T.
     
  9. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    That was a three pointer. :D:D:D
     
  10. If you're playing by yourself, the most important thing is what you think as you prepare to play the two notes. You should be aware of what each of the note names is(ie B on 9ft D string and F on 10ft G string) , which fingering you are going to use (1 + 3), how both of those notes relate to the key center and the current chord(hmmm, this is the major third and flat seventh in the key of G), the interval which separates them (a diminished fifth) and anything else you can think up.

    Once you do that, you don't have to worry about what the double stop is called, because you KNOW it.

    If you're going to write it down, you write down both the notes and it's not a problem what it's called. If you really want to call it something, think harmonically and say "right, now I play the major third and flat seventh out of the current chord which is G7" and you should be fine.

    Well, that's what I do.