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how does one remove a nut?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by dancehallclasher, May 24, 2003.


  1. on my project fretless, i need to remove the nut so i can sand under/around it so the board will be level. how do i take it out without damaging it? it's one of those black plastic nuts.
     
  2. 20db pad

    20db pad

    Feb 11, 2003
    I been everywhere, man...
    None. At all.
    Is it a Fender style deal?

    What's worked for me with a Fender style nut is to use an appropriately sized straight-edge screwdriver and a tack hammer.

    You place the blade of the screwdriver on the side of the nut and gently tap the end of it with the hammer. You have to work slowly, purposefully, and very carefully so as to not chip or damage anything.

    Sometimes you have to break a glue bond, sometimes you don't - it's case by case.

    I'm not a pro luthier, but this process has worked well for me numerous times. Maybe someone will post with a better method. In any case, I gotta repeat the mantra - be careful.
     
  3. anastetics and sizzors. make sure you have really good pain killer for when your done. ^_^

    - w00t
     
  4. Nino Valenti

    Nino Valenti Commercial User

    Feb 2, 2001
    Staten Island NYC
    Builder: Valenti Basses
    HAHAHA. :D John Bobbit will attest to that!!!!!
     
  5. Nino Valenti

    Nino Valenti Commercial User

    Feb 2, 2001
    Staten Island NYC
    Builder: Valenti Basses
    That's how I've done it & seen others do it. <img src="http://www.talkbass.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif">
     
  6. thanks for the advice, i will give it a try.
     
  7. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Michael Dolan told me (over on that other board) that this is indeed how he does it; but that as a luthier he is prepared to break a certain number of nuts. So if he's doing a fretless board leveling, he makes sure he has a replacement nut on hand in case he has to carve a new one, should the odds catch up with him.

    Apparently even the pros don't have a method that's 100% foolproof to save the existing nut.

    'Zat help?
     
  8. come to think of it, i might want to just get a new nut. this one is cut terribly and the string spacing is all off. i've never done it but i bet i could do a better job anyway. i assume that a nut blank is easy to find, but do i need special files or can i use household tools to cut the slots?
     
  9. 20db pad

    20db pad

    Feb 11, 2003
    I been everywhere, man...
    None. At all.
    If you want to get a feel for making a nut, you can get sucessful results with one of those small file sets you can buy at Home Depot. I used a round rat-tail file that was pointed at the tip and around the thickness of an E string at the end. Worked for me, but that was more luck than skill.

    The pros I've observed at work use special files with complimentary diameters - like .105, .085, and so on. These files can be found at www.stewmac.com.

    If it's your first time, buy three nut blanks. This allows you to mess up without being empty handed for your troubles.

    There's a decent nut cutting guide at http://www.rfd.cc/aa/ - it's done on a guitar, but the process is similar for bass. This is the only on-line guide I know of, but the the Guitar Player Guitar Repair book by Dan Erlewine has bass specific info.
     
  10. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
  11. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    Even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in awhile.:D
     
  12. welllllll, i broke the crap out of that nut. looks like it's off to GC and Home Depot tomorrow.
     
  13. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    That sucks. I've actually had better luck using jewelers riffer files than standard needle files - try your local hobby store first, although I think I've seen them at HD. Riffer files are curved and allow you better access to the nut slot with less risk of damage to stuff that shouldn't oughtta been filed.