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How loud is the fan in your QSC-RMX?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Arranger, Apr 23, 2003.


  1. Arranger

    Arranger

    Mar 9, 2003
    Pennsylvania
    I'm looking at the RMX850 for small venues and a little studio work. Will the fan be too loud in the studio?
     
  2. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    probably - one of the first thing the studio engineers here in OZ ask is "can the fan be switched off". They seem to ask it before they've even heard how loud the fan noise is, suggesting to me that any fan noise it too much.

    If it's a problem, get a long speaker lead and put the amp in the control room. Worked for me.
     
  3. ESP-LTD

    ESP-LTD

    Sep 9, 2001
    Idaho
    I'd say a studio would mind, but for on stage it's not important.
     
  4. bben

    bben

    Feb 28, 2002
    Santa Fe, NM
    I had a PLX1602 for a while and the fan was too noisy for me. I play quiet folk gigs sometimes and you could hear it across the room. Nice amp other than that, although you need a strong preamp to drive it.
     
  5. I don't think the fan is any louder on the RMX stuff than on anyother fan cooled amp I've used. Most studios are gonna bitch if it has a fan at all. I always go direct in the studio and bypass the problem.
     
  6. Jeb T

    Jeb T

    Feb 19, 2002
    San Carlos, CA
    Hi,

    One of the reasons the Euphonic Audio iamp800 looks good is because (according to the website and manual) it is so efficient it does not need a fan or heat sink.

    Sounds pretty sweet, indeed!

    Good luck,
    Jeb
     
  7. Jeb T

    Jeb T

    Feb 19, 2002
    San Carlos, CA
    I should add that decreased heat is because the amplifier is digital...the explanation below was stolen from a post by Vic Damone on 12/something/2002.

    "A digital power amplifier has a digital output section. Instead of the tubes or transistors moving current up and down to match the musical signal at the input side of the amp, a digital amp uses transistors or Mosfets in either an on or off state. While this is not a new idea, getting the devices to switch quickly enough to smooth out the digital corners is a result of todays high speed processing and, frankly a great deal more (design).

    The benifits are a huge reduction in heat which translates into a much more efficient amplifier. A typical AB amp is maybe 50% efficient with 50% going up in heat and the other 50% giong to your speaker. A digital amp is 90-95% efficient so you have more volts going to your speaker."
     
  8. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    That's describing a Class D or PWM amp, not necessarily a digital amp.
     
  9. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    The fan in the RMX amps is somewhat noisier than the one used in the PLX amps. Whether it's objectionable or not is a subjective matter. In a studio, though, it's usually possible to place the amp away from the mic (you're miking the speaker, after all), or not use an amp at all. I don't remember ever using an amp for recording over the past twenty-some years; I'm pretty sure I've always gone direct.