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How many of you live sound guys also record?

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by WashburnAB95, Jun 5, 2014.


  1. WashburnAB95

    WashburnAB95

    Nov 18, 2013
    I have set up sound for church grouips off and on for a while now and also ussually play for them as well. I just recently got into recording with my zoom h6. I have noticed an unexpected benefite of this new hobby. Being able too solo each channel and tweak each band of eq all the way and listening in the leisure of your own room, and being able to really hear what each channel picks up has greatly improved my live sound chops.


    I find my self being able to hear things better in live situations and respond much quicker and more efficently. Who else has found this to be true? Do the skills overlap?
     
  2. Hi.

    IMO, if there's one thing that improves ones performance best, is to be able to view/hear it later.

    OTOH, I've been recording since the late 80's and I'm still pretty lousy at playing ;).
    Not very good at recording either...

    Regards
    Sam
     
  3. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    For fee... I carry a macbook that links via firewire. I can run the board remotely from my iPad networked the mac, while recording 16 tracks. Another iPad runs the lights.
     
  4. WashburnAB95

    WashburnAB95

    Nov 18, 2013
    Can I clarify the question? I want to know how many mix live sound and also record. How do the two compare and constrast? How have skills learned in one helped in the other area?
     
  5. If you are saying recording as in multi-track recording and mixing it at a later stage, that's what I'm doing now. I'm the sound guy for my band and also, I'm recording and mixing songs in my free time. IMO, recording and mixing will give you a better understanding of how a sound can sound good in a mix as you are spending a lot more time listening to individual sounds and instruments and using tools such as EQ, effects and compressors to make them blend well together. In a live sound setting, it's usually very difficult to spend a lot of time tweaking sounds. But after mixing of recorded tracks, I'm able to use what I've learnt to use it in my live sound mixing to make the live sound better. So my take is that recording will definitely help your ear for good sound and will definitely improve your live sound mixing capability.
     
  6. WashburnAB95

    WashburnAB95

    Nov 18, 2013
    Not nessisarily that you are doing both at the same time... just that you have an an instrest in both at one time or another.
     
  7. WashburnAB95

    WashburnAB95

    Nov 18, 2013
    Exactly what I have found... I have already tweaked everything possible at home in my bedroom I find myself being able to diagnosis and fix problems in live situations. Who here has the patience and wants to hear their sound quy tweak every possible feature on every channel durring sound check?
     
  8. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    I find the experience of mixing new bands and recording my own stuff very, very different. The workflow is entirely different. For me, one does not necessarily inform the other.
     
  9. Hi.

    I started recording before I started doing sound.

    Doing FOH/foldback doesn't IMO help in recording in any way or form, but the close-mic and FX techniques "perfected" when tracking and in mixdown will IME help tremendously in a live situation.
    Compressing for example is something that one simply can't practise too much.

    Miking is way more demanding in a live situation though, so only a portion of the techiques will work satisfactorily.
    Also, unless some dimwit thinks SM58 (or 57 for that matter) is the BEST studio vocal mic EVER, You won't be able to use any of the vocal tracking tricks you learn in studio when doing live sound.


    In a live situation the present is the only time You have, eff it up and the soup just went sour, but usually in both tracking and especially in mixdown one has all the time in the world to do the necessary tweaks and changes.

    But...

    ^This, IMO the only common thing is the music.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  10. D.A.R.K.

    D.A.R.K. Supporting Member

    Aug 20, 2003
    Virginia
    I tour professionally as a foh engineer and also work professionally as a recording engineer, both separate from playing bass. I won't mix my own band live, and prefer not to track my own full band projects (although i'll mix them post). I agree that it's an entirely different approach, although the focus on the source being as good as possible is the same. Recording is all about a controlled environment, live sound is about dealing with out of control environments.
     
  11. WashburnAB95

    WashburnAB95

    Nov 18, 2013
    That is the differnce..... as long as you have your source files of in case of emergency your performers, you can recover from any mistake you make, in live situations that is not an option. Sometimes reliablity is more imortant thant absolute quality.
     

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