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How many times around the post?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Michael Jewels, Jan 29, 2002.


  1. How many times do you normally wind your strings around the post on your tuning machines?

    I usually try to get 4 spins* around the post, but, on my Stingray, it came from the factory with barely two.

    Will too many change the sound?

    Mike J.

    *forget this on the B or E strings.
     
  2. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    it really depends on the thickness of the string. i make sure that the string doesn't overlap on the post, but otherwise it varies from 2-3 on the larger strings to 4-6 on the thinner ones.
     
  3. Each string should be wrapped exactly 3 times around the post... no more, no less.
     
  4. BassPlayer101

    BassPlayer101

    Jul 27, 2001
    Omaha,NE
    I have been told by my bass teacher 3 to 4
     
  5. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    ooo, what's the penalty for violation?
     
  6. old_skool

    old_skool

    Aug 17, 2000
    Milwaukee, WI
    I heard to cut the strings two tunning pegs longer than the one you are stringing.
     
  7. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Too many causes a string to slip.

    The "how many" depends on the bass;

    - "pinched"/narrowed-middle tuning pegs or straight shaft?
    - locking tuning gears?
    - headstock angle?
    - and like John says, what gauge of strings?

    IMO, sweating over 3 or 4 turns is hair-splitting. Some designs do fine with 2.
     
  8. I once over cut my string on my soudgear... I got 3/4 of a turn, but it was tight as any other and did not go out of tune so go figure...
     
  9. Slater

    Slater Bye Millen! Hello?

    Apr 17, 2000
    The Great Lakes State
    I've never counted the number of wraps I get around the tuning post. I try to get enough wraps to wind the string just to the bottom of the post.
     
  10. I just cut the string @ 3 to 4 inches past the tuning post with E & A strings.. 4 to 5 inch with the D & G strings.. perfect fit every time.
     
  11. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    On my basses, I wind enough to cover most of the peg, so it's got a good downward angle over the nut. Sometimes its 3, sometimes twice that. On my Roscoe, I get 3 on the B only if I'm overlapping the string, because the peg is so small. Either way, I only have to tune about once every week or two, if that.
     
  12. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    My dad a while ago was putting new strings on my bass because he was going to borrow it for a gig, and he cut the strings, which is something i normally don't do. He cut the g too short and it had about 1/2 - 3/4 of a turn. It angered me a bit... They were my strings...
     
  13. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Shoulda slapped him.


    Ok, maybe not. Anywho, Slater describe my technique...

    " I've never counted the number of wraps I get around the tuning post. I try to get enough wraps to wind the string just to the bottom of the post."

    Simple.
     
  14. Something I just noticed: If you look on page 69 of the current (February) issue of Bass player magazine, there's a picture of a gorgeous Bolin bass that they're doing a review on, but, look at the headstock :eek: most of the strings barely have ONE TURN around the tuning post! Ewww!

    Wassup wit dat?

    Is this supposed to be cool? :confused:

    Mike J.
     
  15. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    It had locking tuners, IIRC. You should still put a wrap or two on locking strings, but you don't HAVE to .
     
  16. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    What goes wrong if there aren't enough turns on a d or g string? (i know what happens on a "e" and "a.")
     
  17. mgood

    mgood

    Sep 29, 2001
    Levelland, Texas
    Exactly.

    I put as many NEAT wraps as I can get on the post without any strings overlapping. I'm probably way too anal about this, but my basses stay in tune like forever. Before I remove the old string, I give it a close look to see if it could be a touch longer or if I just about got it too long last time. I take it off and then straighten out the curl from where it was wrapped around the peg and straighten the bend where it went over the bridge. I then measure the new string against the old one, keeping in mind that the new string will stretch a little when it is put on and put under tension. But the fact that you can never get the old one completely straight more or less offsets the amount of stretch the new one will get. I carefull bend the new string at a 90 degree angle at the point where it will go through the tuning peg. Then I run it through the bridge and place the bend in the peg and start winding, keeping the string under tension the whole time I'm winding it. (That almost requires three hands, but with a little practice it becomes less difficult.) I wind the first wind over the end that sticks through the peg to lock it in place. The next one goes under and all the rest continue under the one above them. It makes perfect windings that completely cover the peg and won't slip.

    I have never, ever removed a string and put it back on. If I take a string off a bass, or guitar, that string is trash. I've never replaced single strings except once or twice in an emergency on someone else's guitar. I always change all of them at once.

    Am I going way overboard with this?