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How to Care for Basses in a Garage?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by albass111, Feb 27, 2006.


  1. albass111

    albass111 Supporting Member

    Feb 13, 2006
    Los Angeles, CA
    Hello,

    I live in California where the weather seems to be the same 10 months out of the year. I currently store some equipment in a garage that is not insulated whatsoever. We;ve had a little bit of rain recently and I noticed that a Lakland, which I had not played in a few months, had a huge neck shift even though it was stored in it's original hard case. Then, I looked at my SVT810, and the corners and screws had some new rusting. My roommate's Boogie Guitar Combo had some rust on a transformer and don't even get me started about his MIM Strat.
    Being that most of you have much harsher weather conditions, I really need some suggestions on how to properly care for this gear in the garage. Are there effective covers, methods?

    Oh yeah, my Sadowsky neck, didn't move at all.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Rezdog

    Rezdog Supporting Member

    Feb 17, 2004
    T.Rez, Canada
    Greetings from the North,
    Get a dehumidifier and put it in the garage. If you like your basses and guitars don't leave em in the garage.
    Rezdog
     
  3. bikeplate

    bikeplate Supporting Member

    Jun 7, 2001
    Upstate NY
    HI

    yea. Its the humidity changes that do it. Salt air will eat metal parts, too. I lived in Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, and Newport for about 15 years so I can speak from experience

    Rob
     
  4. skoti89

    skoti89

    Feb 23, 2006
    Chico, Ca
  5. bass-shy

    bass-shy

    Jan 11, 2005
    Florida
    The best thing would be to store your gear elsewhere. It's a pain lugging gear back and forth but it's better than replacing and fixing stuff all the time. Also, if you plan on storing a bass in it's case for a long period of time, you should loosen the strings one or two turns each. Doing this will reduce neck shifting. Hope this helps and good luck.
     
  6. albass111

    albass111 Supporting Member

    Feb 13, 2006
    Los Angeles, CA
    I would love to store my gear elsewhere but I don't have any room in my house. I have 8 cabs and 9 basses. Do blankets work?
     
  7. I don't know about the amps, maybe a blanket or something, but for musical instruments, just leave them at home. Unless you're Tom Bowlus, there's always SOME room in the house for at least 5 or 6 guitar cases. You don't necessarily have to store the cabs at your house, but at least keep the basses in your closet or something.

    To Bass-Shy, I read in the new issue of BP in an input section from Bass Central that this isn't the correct way to do things. He said that most manufacturers ship their basses tuned to pitch, to keep the neck in tact. Loosening the strings loosens the tension on the neck, which will eventually cause backbow. The guy (manager from Bass Central, can't remember his name) said he's seen irrepairable damage due to people hearing half the story (to losen strings) and not the other half: to loosen the truss rod. IF you are going to losen strings (which he doesn't reccomend), you must also loosen the truss rod.


    Peace
    Drake
     
  8. bikeplate

    bikeplate Supporting Member

    Jun 7, 2001
    Upstate NY
    HI

    yea. basses and guitars are meant to be strung up at tension
    part of the design

    Rob
     
  9. No. Blankets will only attract more moisture, and if they're covering the instruments...well you get the picture. MOLD.

    At the very least, store the basses somewhere that's consistant. Your amps might have problems if the circuitry gets crap on them from the shift in humidity, etc. Is the garage insulated? Insulate the walls and the door and then put plastic on the floor (paint drop cloth works good for that...) to keep moisture from coming up from the ground. (It WILL come through the concrete, or asphalt.) You can always put carpet, (find some remenents), over the plastic.
    You'll need to do that if you can't move the stuff somewhere else. Consistancy is the key when it comes to storing gear.

    Good luck!
     
  10. bikeplate

    bikeplate Supporting Member

    Jun 7, 2001
    Upstate NY
    HI

    Sounds like you are in a tough spot. Personally, I would never leave a bass in the car, garage, etc. Always stay inside at a consistant temperature. Wish you had some options. Its tough on your gear when you have no storage

    Rob
     
  11. byoung

    byoung

    Mar 13, 2005
    Covington, WA
    If you're storing your basses in cases for longer durations, it is best to store them vertically, tail down. This will help to relieve stresses on the neck. As said earlier, leave them strung and to pitch.

    Don't do anything drastic to them. Some type of quick temperature swing probably caused your neck movement; try to let them adjust slowly to temperature and humidity changes.

    Brad
     
  12. bass-shy

    bass-shy

    Jan 11, 2005
    Florida
    I just read in the use and care manuals from Martin and ESP that one should loosen the strings before long periods of storage. I have also heard stories of basses being dropped while tuned to tension, (in hard cases) resulting in broken truss rods. I am not trying to argue with anyone, I would just really like to know the proper method for storing instruments. It seems as though there are at least two schools of thought on the subject. If I gave wrong information and/or bad advice, I apologize.
     
  13. fatsobasso

    fatsobasso

    Dec 24, 2005
    Ormond florida
    storing and shipping are a little different,if you ship a bass with the strings real loose,the neck could move at the neck plate,i think storing a bass in a not to damp or dry place,tuned down a half or whole step,would be fine.Some silca gel packets,will help prevent metal rust and maybe a polish with flitz metal polish.
     
  14. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    My "music room" actually isn't even all that big. I just know how to pack 'em in! :D
     
  15. :D Yeah!

    Would you mind posting one of the wide shots of your gear room? So much gear, so little time... :D
     
  16. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    North central Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    These shots are way out dated, but sure:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. SoulMaim

    SoulMaim

    Dec 1, 2005
    Ontario
    Holy crap that's a lot of gear:eek:
     
  18. kelbrihan

    kelbrihan Banned [Deceiving users with multiple usernames] Banned

    Dec 2, 2004
    How to Care for Basses in a Garage? Put them in a potato sack, go into your back yard, dig a hole and bury them up to their necks. Duh everyone knows that. Seriously I hang my Foderas on meat hooks in my walk in freezer.:rolleyes:
     
  19. kelbrihan

    kelbrihan Banned [Deceiving users with multiple usernames] Banned

    Dec 2, 2004
    Seriously, "doctor it hurts when I do this", Dr says " then don't do this".
    Take your basses in the house!!!! Is your house that small that you can't carry them inside? My guitar player always forgets to get his guitar out of his trunk from gig to gig, so it sits out there from saturday night to the following friday, and we live in Michigan!! This is your brain on drugs.
     
  20. Skeletomania

    Skeletomania

    Oct 25, 2005
    hong kong
    I saw that piece he mentioned. The guy's name is Scott "Grasshopper" Ryder. He suggest losening the truss rod for shipping as well as long period of storing.