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How to Equalize Properly for Different Sized Rooms

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Jazzin', Feb 14, 2006.


  1. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    So what's your general rule of thumb when equalizing your amp/preamp for a big gig or a small practice room, or anything in between? What (which frequencies) goes up? What goes down? I'm very clueless on this whole topic. Enlighten me.
     
  2. ScoobyGoo

    ScoobyGoo

    Feb 10, 2006
    I'm not as experienced when it comes to these things as most people, but from a basic understanding of waves and messing around in some different situations..

    Low Freq's dissipate slowly, thats why when you hear cars driving through the streets you hear the bass easily but no treble, low end freq's can propogate easily..that means you don't really have to worry about your low settings so much in bigger venues and you might want to turn them down in smaller areas

    Higher freq's dissipate much faster, so in bigger venues you need to pump those up..


    I hope i'm not wrong! lol..
     
  3. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    Thanks, but I already knew that.... excpet for that last sentence.:)
    I'm not asking for that.
    I want to know what the general rule of thumb is for "editing" my equalization from room to room. Like what I should raise and what I should lower between and small room and a big room. Or what the differences are with different types of walls/floors/cieling, like what theyre made of and if theyre made specifially for good acoustics or if it's just a random bar. And also, outdoors seems to be a challenge. I don't have experience with lots of different places. I do most of my playing in my living room with my band, and I want to sound best "for the people" when I perform at a gig.
     
  4. Kael

    Kael Supporting Member

    Dec 26, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    Actually, I do the opposite. For smaller venues where I am playing with less volume, I am more likely to bump the lows up a tad. When playing full blown, then I'm more likely to cut the lows a little and bump more mids. Of course that is very room dependent. Played a medium smallish venue last night in a very boomy room. Large surface area hollow stage, metal ceilings, etc. Not a lot of stage volume happening, but it was definitely a low end being cut situation. Bottom line, it will always depend on both the room and the volume I need.
     
  5. I don't bother with the bass rig.

    When doing PA, I EQ for the room using a pink noise generator and flat response in the area where most of the audience will be. This is usually a bar, and mostly a crap shoot because things change again when the venue is full of people.
     
  6. barthanatos

    barthanatos Insert witty comment here

    Feb 8, 2006
    South Carolina
    So I've heard of this pink noise generator thing, at least to know what you're talking about. Is there like a specific model you have? And you output it's signal through the PA? I guess someone could output it through their rig, or in combination with PA?

    How do you know you have a flat response? Do you have some sort of frequency-analyzer-doohickey?

    Forgive the gross ignorance...
     
  7. LoGruvz

    LoGruvz

    Apr 11, 2003
    Atlanta, GA
    If you really want something cool check out the DBX DriveRack PA unit. You could use it for a bass rig. It automatically checks the room for the right eq and sets it. You use a specific mic that comes with it (optional) and you can save the eq settings for each club you play in so the next time you are there you just call it up. We use one in our PA and it rocks.

    www.driverack.com
     
  8. alanbass1

    alanbass1

    Feb 8, 2006
    London
    I tend to use my Thunderfunk in smaller rooms and my WT800B in bigger rooms. More radical than eq'ing, but I always take both (one for back up) and this generally works out what sounds best. Then, I tend to keep the eq fairly flat. Fortunately, I've not had an amp failure to date so haven't really had to 're-tweak' the back up. I'm sure that one day this will come.