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How to Fix a Hercules Stand?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Gravedigger Dav, Aug 30, 2016.


  1. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    I have a Hercules for 2 basses. I really like it, but it has developed a problem and I can't find a way to get in touch with Hercules directly.
    The problem is the arms that swing in to position to hold the bass when you put it on the stand are pointing the wrong direction on one of the hangers.
    Should Be: How it is:
    | | _ \

    I tried manually putting them in the correct position, but I'm afraid of breaking something.
    Does anyone know how to fix this or know who I can call to get it fixed? The stand is only about 3 months old, so should be under warranty if there is one.
     
  2. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
  3. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    I was already there. It is no help at all. Went to GC at lunch for some strings and they said they will take care of it.
    Thanks,
     
  4. MD

    MD

    Nov 7, 2000
    Marin Co. CA.
    Ah, good.
    I guess then you don't need my .02 that if you can't muscle it into place, to get a hammer and beat the snot out of it.
     
    sissy kathy likes this.
  5. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    LOL, well, I did talk to a guy I know at GC. He said to bring it in and they will make it right. I'm sure it has nothing to do with the fact that I've bought 3 basses, 3 amps, monitors, straps, stands, mics, strings, shirts, hats, and maybe some other stuff I don't remember there. But I like the beat the snot out of it part.
     
    FrankLowend likes this.
  6. nutdog

    nutdog Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2009
    In the dog house.
    I was able to reach hercules through facebook message.
     
  7. DiabolusInMusic

    DiabolusInMusic Functionless Art is Merely Tolerated Vandalism Supporting Member

    How are you liking the stand otherwise? I have been debating buying one. Side question, do you keep a nitro finished bass on it?
     
  8. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    I really like the stand. It is very convenient. I don't own any nitro basses, but then I only use it during a gig. My basses usually stay in cases except the one I'm using for home practice and it is on a different type of stand.
     
    DiabolusInMusic and Tom Bomb like this.
  9. Tom Bomb

    Tom Bomb

    Apr 23, 2014
    I remember reading this - Hercules Stands FAQ - before I got my first one. I have one single stand and one triple too now and have had no dramas whatsoever with any finish, including nitrocellulose. They're good, solid, very stable, well engineered stands - hard to believe they'd release anything that made a mess of things. They DO warn however, covering their backs, I suppose, that manufacturers use different formulations of nitro, so you can never be certain that things won't come unstuck.

    I had a look at the mechanism that went haywire for the OP. Bummer that :( There's a keyhole type opening at the rear where, I imagine, one should be able to somehow disengage and then realign the mechanism. I tentatively pushed and prodded the two disparate moving parts with a small screwie but couldn't easily make any dent in my ignorance. Stopped short, just so I didn't create any unnecessary woes for myself, but I imagine there must be a way to disengage and then realign that crooked locking arm - probably via that keyhole.
     
  10. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    I also thought perhaps that keyhole might be a way to disengage or adjust the mechanism, but it is not. Last night I pried off the plate that covers the mechanism. It turns out to be a simple design.
    The arm that turns to hold the neck in place has a hole through it. A small rod goes through the hole that is bent at a right angle. The other end of the rod goes through a plate. Both rods attach to the plate, one at either end. The plate being pulled down turns the two rods 90° which rotates the arm. I was unable to disassemble it further for fear of damaging it, but what I couldn't figure out is how they got that way. The mechanism looks like it is exactly as it should be.
    But, I will be taking the stand to GC today. I assume they will replace it.
     
    Tom Bomb likes this.
  11. Tom Bomb

    Tom Bomb

    Apr 23, 2014
    You're a braver man than me :) Another piece of the puzzle: At the front side there are two small foam discs inside two circular recesses at either side. I removed the foam from one to find a small phillips-head screw which I unscrewed thinking I had the answer. Alas, the arm didn't come free. Maybe it will with some more force. But, again, I chickened out :smug: - looks interesting though.

    I hope they give you a new one. I reckon they will. But, I'd still like to get to the bottom of this, somehow. No pressure ;) Come on you tinkerers - Chime in anytime :bassist:
     
  12. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Were a replacement not quite so expensive and I have a good chance of getting a replacement at no cost, I would tinker until I either fixed or irreparably broke it. I'll let you know this afternoon. I'm going to GC at lunch. If they don't replace it, I will be working on it this evening.
     
    Tom Bomb likes this.
  13. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    Here's what I've come up with. The portion of the plate on the stand (which is stationary) has a central vertical rib that is toothed on both the left and right sides, the arms that rotate 90 degrees when weight is put on the have small gears on the ends that engage those teeth. When weight is put on the arms the front plate moves down, causing the rods to move down relative to the toothed rib. The engaged gears on the rear of the rods are then forced to turn locking the bass in place. Lifting the bass will let a spring (that was compressed when placing the bass in the holder) raise the front plate to unlock the base by reversing the action previously described.

    So, why'd it brake?
    The gears disengaged with the toothed rib, slipped and then reengaged.

    Why did that happen?
    Since the front plate has to slide up and down, that suggests a keyway was used to keep the two plates together and it some how has failed to do the job.

    So how do you fix it?
    That's the 64,000 $ question isn't it. 70 years ago you could have disassembled it, realigned the parts and presto, it's like new. With the materials used today there are any number of ways to assemble something to prevent tampering AND unfortunately they're cheaper than nuts and bolts assembly. Without having the piece in front of me, or at least very detailed photos, I'm afraid I've taken you as far as I can go.
     
    Tom Bomb likes this.
  14. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Where are these gears with teeth? I did see any such thing. The action I saw was much more simplistic than that.
     
  15. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    I was invited to conjour up a solution to your problem. In order to do that I had to figure out how it works. That is the solution I, repeat I, came up with. I don't imagine that is the only solution possible. Everything I posted is conjecture in my head.

    But to answer your question, those gears would be sandwiched between the two plates that slide
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2016
  16. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Nope. As I posted earlier, the shaft that turns the arm that holds the neck in place has a hole in it. one end of a rod goes through the shaft. The rod is bent at 90°. The other end of the rod is connected to the plate. When the weight of the bass pushes down, the plate is pulled up and it turns the shafts. I actually was expecting to see gears and thought it would be a matter of moving the gears to align the shafts because somehow the gears had jumped cogs.
     
  17. RustyAxe

    RustyAxe

    Jul 8, 2008
    Connecticut
    I fixed my Herc dual stand by throwing it in closet and buying two Ultimate S-100 stands. Why anyone needs a mechanical guitar stand is beyond me.
     
  18. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    I mechanical stand is his preference. He didn't buy it to satisfy you, or he would have consulted you and heeded your advice. I happen to think it's a pretty ingenious device, but I have enough trouble using the simple stand I have.
     
    Tbone76 and Killed_by_Death like this.
  19. RustyAxe

    RustyAxe

    Jul 8, 2008
    Connecticut
    Did I say he did? He DID ask how I fixed mine ... cuz Hercules wouldn't, and wouldn't send me the tiny part it required. Maybe someone else will heed my advice.
     
  20. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Halethorpe, MD
    I certainly have although maybe not the same alternative.