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How to lower volume on your monitor and not PA.

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by steve5224, Aug 27, 2012.


  1. So most of the gigs im connected to the PA system so i can be heard a little more, as so they say. I have a tonebone that i use when we have bigger gigs, love it to death gives me the extra punch and clarity that i need. The only problem is that when i crank up my pedal so that it can be punchier on the PA its getting a little to loud for my monitor. I have a SWR 4x10 and a SWR 750x head. I was wondering if theres away that i can control the volume that goes to the outside from my pedal but not gain any volume on my monitor. Without the obvious which is turn it up in the board. Sometimes we dont have anyone on the board so than i would be screwed.
     
  2. the Arsonaut

    the Arsonaut

    Aug 27, 2012
    Try a compressor. Seriously.
    you can designate it for your monitor channel only, or for your input, if you like what it does for your sound.

    HOW TO:

    figure out how much gain yer tone bone is adding. Subtract (from 0) that via threshold. Start around 2:1-4:1. Mess with your attack (how quick it kicks in) and release (how quick it lets go). If you've subtracted too much, add a lil back in, via Output Gain.
    That's the More of Less of it.

    A good used rack compressor will run under a hundred, Alesis 3630s-ashly-dbx
     
  3. MooseLumps

    MooseLumps

    Nov 4, 2007
    Portland
    Tell us a little more about the PA/ monitor setup. In most small setups there are separate mixes for the stage and the house. If you are sending your signal to the mixing board with the tonebone, then the soundperson can control the level of the signal pushed to the monitor mix.
    Are you sharing a mix with someone?
    Is your amp too quiet/far away for good monitoring?
    What's the venue like?
    I can think of a lot of solutions involving gear, but the best solution I would think would be a balanced monitor mix with the gear you have now.
     
  4. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Why are you running your bass signal into the monitors?

    Riis
     
  5. Well when I reference monitor I mean my amp SWR 4x10. When I gain my pedal it's loud for the amp but perfect to the sound that's going out.
     
  6. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    Uh, turn down the amp ? I must be missing something. I also run a bassbone. I send the xlr to the PA, output to my amp. Ole is wide open on the BB. I set my amp accordingly. I don't use the boost. I have a shorting plug in the loop so the boost/loop switch becomes tuner - mute. Works great for me....
     
  7. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Banned

    Feb 21, 2010
    St. Louis


    ^
    This.
     
  8. MooseLumps

    MooseLumps

    Nov 4, 2007
    Portland
    Plug into the bassbone, then that to the amp (monitor) then use the DI on the back of the amp to the PA. The DI has it's own volume on the amp, and the board can adapt that to the house sound. Set your playing volume to your liking, then set the PA volume at the board. If the signal is too weak at the board, bring up the volume for the DI. Too loud for the room? Bring it back down.

    This will also work if you skip the Bassbone entirely. It also gives you control over FOH volume without having to leave the stage. Fight the urge to turn up during the gig, ears tend to become accustomed to loud sounds, and this tricks people into thinking they need more volume mid-gig.
     
  9. the Arsonaut

    the Arsonaut

    Aug 27, 2012
    Is this all about not understanding how to use a compressor?

    This is the main reason we use compressors in a live setting...to control signal level and reduce peaks.
    If you have to have your signal coming at you in a monitor, and you are so worried about peaks, you're not going to mind a lil compression on your monitor channel.
    Just a boy, his monitor, and a compressor...the world will never have to know.
     
  10. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    and why would you be trying to change the level of the out-front sound when you're on stage? you have no idea what it sounds like out there unless you're sitting out there.

    create a good level into the house by whatever means, then leave it there, adjusting your on-stage sound only with your amp.

    if you don't know how to separate the two, then a compressor is another layer of complexity you don't need to deal with (and probably isn't the solution anyway).
     
  11. the Arsonaut

    the Arsonaut

    Aug 27, 2012
    ahem...reread the OP's issue.
    It's his monitor level. My first post gives a walk thru of using a rack compressor for this exact issue.
     
  12. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Okay, so we're talking about your 4 X 10 backline enclosure, not the PA's wedge monitor. Thanks for the clarification.

    Agree with Walter on this one....you need to keep your signal > mixer fairly consistent without any abrupt increases in volume. Changes in tonal character are fine provided you do the necessary gain & volume adjustments amongst the pedals and amp...and mixer.

    Riis
     
  13. the Arsonaut

    the Arsonaut

    Aug 27, 2012
    hmm...what can keep signal consistent, without abrupt changes to volume...
     
  14. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    a bass player who knows how to adjust his stage volume without bumping his DI level ;)
     

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