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HOW TO PRACTICE ARPEGGIOS

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by devine, Aug 13, 2010.


  1. Nothing was seeing D'Angelo's first cd. From 1995 to about 1998 he's all i personally listened too.

    When he integrated that soulquarian sound (Pino, Questlove, Poyser) it was a real turn off to me, as his feel was absent on his last cd, imho.

    I read a post on here about an artist i decided to check out (Citizen Cope) and took to his sound instantly. Although his last cd lost a bit of steam to me, his body of work is incredible.
     
  2. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Wow, loads of question lol! Here goes...

    Vibhas_2310...
    Concerning studying with Willis.
    It was a great experience as you would imagine... quite surreal to start with as i had been a real fan of his for years before i met him so it was almost like meeting a childhood hero. I then found myself in his apartment talking about basses and bikes... weird! As a learning experience it was great as well, he was really quick to pick up on what i needed to be focusing my practice upon. Willis has also got a very unique way of improvising over chord changes using multiple substitutions of pentatonic scales which is very unique to him. I did study it hard for around one year but found that it was so unique to him i started to actually sound like a Gary Willis tribute bass player which i really didn't want. I can hear whether someone's been shedding this stuff instantaneously as the sound of the lines created are very typical of pentatonic substitutions. So... the lessons were great as he helped me focus on the correct things within my practice schedule, and i learned a valuable lesson... don't become a bad tribute of someone else's playing, try and find your own thing! What i also learned from the lessons was that studying with a famous bass player is not necessarily any better than studying with a great teacher within your own city. Now don't get me wrong, he was a great teacher, but before the lessons i almost viewed him as some sort of super-being who would be able to tell me 'the secret' to being an amazing musician and the meaning of life etc. What i actually found was a guy... yes just a guy, who had practiced really hard and found his own way to becoming a great musician. No secret recipe, damn! And to add to that, the most helpful lessons i have ever had were actually from a guitar player called Mike Walker based over here in the UK. I think i learned more in around five lessons from him than i learned from anyone else.

    KingRazor...
    If your dealing with straight triadic chords you can simply omit the 7th from the arpeggio, which means you'll be using triads instead of the full arpeggio. You can do the same continuous exercises with triads but they don't fit under the fingers quite as well because of the fourth movements within the triads... as in, G to C would be the movement of a fourth. This movement is a pain because they're on different string but on the same fret. They're fine when played at a manageable tempo but when things start to speed up it can get a little awkward. There's a great guitar player called John Stowell who has been a major influence on my improvising, he is a monster at using superimposed triads on top of standard chord progressions. Check him out just to see what can be done with something as simple as a triad!

    A good thing to do on suspended 7th chords is to play a minor arpeggio from the fifth of the chord... So if you have a Dsus7 chord you improvise around Am7. The A is the fifth of the chord, the C is the 7th, the E is the 9th and the G is the 11th. It just makes it a lot simpler.

    Fountain Boy...
    D'Angelo's first album... killin!!

    Easy guys,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  3. I see. The reason I ask is that in the music I play there are a lot more major and minor chords than there are 7th, major 7th, or minor 7th chords.
     
  4. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    King Razor...
    Got ya... Also take into account that you can imply the 7th of a chord even if it's not written. Don't feel like you have to stick to triads... if the chart says Am most of the time you can play Am7. Do keep in mind though that major chords could have either a natural 7th or flattened 7th, so it's up to you to figure out which one can be implied. Obviously if it's a I or IV chord it's the natural 7th whereas if it's functioning as a V chord it will be a flattened 7th.

    Hope that helps,

    Easy,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  5. Glad you said that actually, as I didn't actually know that the I and IV chords were usually natural 7ths. Thanks for that little tid bit.
     
  6. Thanks Scott...its interesting to hear your take on all this, but I do agree with what you're saying . I wonder if he gave u stick on that " bloody C string on the bass which sounds like a cat "...haha...
     
  7. I still think that this is the best thread going and needs a permanent anchor.

    :bassist:
     
  8. fervezas

    fervezas

    Aug 13, 2010
    Madrid, Spain

    Really really cool stuff Scott! Not just the clip but the whole arpeggios subject are pretty well explained!! Soooo intuitive!!!

    Cheers from the hottest Madrid!!! :smug:

    Fer
     
  9. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Hey thanks for kind words and support guys! I've got another really great exercise that i give to my students which i'll post up in around a week. It's basically the same concept as the continuous arpeggio exercises but done with scales instead. It's a real melon twister! But, if you get it into your practice routine it'll really make a difference to your playing and your understanding/visualization of harmony on the fretboard.

    So, watch this space!

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  10. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
    This will be posted for the 4 string bass, right? :eyebrow:
     
  11. A tempo

    A tempo

    May 23, 2010
    Hey Scott, would you please post your upcoming scale study in it's own thread as no one will be looking for a scale study in an arpeggio titled thread.

    Thanks for this thread, keep the studies coming.
     
  12. A tempo, i fixed it for ya bro. ;)
     
  13. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy

    Jun 16, 2009
    does it matter just ignore the high c string
     
  14. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    IMO it does matter. In one of the exercises, Scott plays up to a certain note. Then he says to go to the next available note in the arpeggio. On a five string, this note is different (as is the actual string !! ) then if you are using a four string. This is if you want to keep within the first five frets, as Scott does in the exercises.

    Things like this can be very confusing to a noob.
     
  15. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  16. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
    +1. Thankyou.
    ....but Im not a noob, yet it was still confusing for the exact reason you explained.
     
  17. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    I am not a noob either, and I was confused. I P.M'd Scott about it and he very kindly explained how it would work on a four string.

    Thanks for your time and effort Scott. :)
     
  18. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    No worries 4 string guys.

    Again, if anyone has any queries don't hesitate to mail me a question or preferably put it up here so it can be public. If you've got a question, you can bet that other guys out there have the very same question so it's good to get all this stuff online for peoples referencing purposes.

    Easy,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  19. While I'm sure 4 string players will appreciate it, I learned on a 5 string. So for me it really doesn't make a difference how many strings you have or what they're tuned to, the lesson makes just as much sense. It shouldn't matter to a musician what notes their instrument is tuned to (assuming it's tuned to the right frequency at least xD) as long as the instrument is in-tune at least. BEADG, EADGC, or EADGCF shouldn't make a difference to your ability to play.
     
  20. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    So you dont agree with what I say in post number 74 ?
     

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