1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

HOW TO PRACTICE ARPEGGIOS

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by devine, Aug 13, 2010.


  1. No, not really. It's not hard for me to ignore the parts where he plays on the high C string. Just like I can ignore the low B on my 5 string if I'm playing a song written on a 4 string.

    If it makes it easier for people to understand what he's doing when he plays a 4 string, then that's great if he chooses to do that. Personally, it won't make a difference to me.
     
  2. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    Well good for you !!! :)

    But is not everyone's needs and learning methods different ?
     
  3. Sure and the more effort Devine takes to make his lessons as easy to understand by as many people as possible, the better! I'm all for that.

    However, I just don't believe the number of strings should matter. Any person should be able to learn music regardless of what instrument is being used to teach. It should be just as easy to learn from a piano or a guitar or an 11 string bass as it is to learn from someone playing on a 4 string. It's all the same notes, the differences mainly lie in octaves. Ignore strings and frets for a minute and focus on the notes you're playing.
     
  4. Rudreax

    Rudreax

    Jun 14, 2008
    New York, NY
    In a way, I think you shouldn't be worrying about the kind of bass used, as you're are learning about MUSIC and not just playing bass. As KingRazor said, it shouldn't matter what intstrument is used, as this kind of exercise should be used to set a grounding in music as well as playing a bass guitar.
     
  5. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
    Yeah, but this thread is about Scott's "arrpegio exercise" itself. Not so much about the philosophical aspects of learning music.
    Once Scott re-wrote it for a 4string and I played it on my four string, I understood it easily and can now probably play it on a 5,6,7,8 or 12 string if i wanted....now that i understand Scott's "arrpegio exercise" itself.
     
  6. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  7. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
    Right.
    How is that scale exercise you promised us last week coming??? :eyebrow:
    Cant wait to get busy with it.
     
  8. Warfender

    Warfender

    Oct 25, 2009
  9. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
  10. Warfender

    Warfender

    Oct 25, 2009
    OK....well I thought it was kinda cool anyway and sorta a Slipknot type thing in lieu of painted nails like punk and metal players do. I feel his pain as I get Carpaltunnel from all my playing and motorcycle racing, no nothing near OP's level. Keep up the good work!!!!!
     
  11. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  12. A tempo

    A tempo

    May 23, 2010
    I lifted the above from Scott's blog where he introduces this arpeggio study, and I concur, these exercises ARE hard and DO take a lot of practice.

    Scott, I realize that you repeat the 1-3-5-7-1-... for us to get a feel for the physical and audible pattern of the chords. Would it be a natural progression, after developing a real understanding of your study and including diminished (and other types of) chords, to go to 1-3-5-7-9-11-13?

    Considering the wisdom in this study I am nearly ashamed for having encouraged additional studies (#74). I mean, I have to sleep sometime. With me, this study is doing its' voodoo, thank you.
     
  13. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    I'll leave it to Scott to give you a definitive answer.


    However, what I'm now doing, having practiced the 1,3,5,7,1 chords is to start on different notes e.g. 3,7,5,1 for one chord, then 7,5,1,3, for the next etc.

    IMO, this gets you out of the habit of always starting on the root note, and gets your ear used to the different sounds within a chord. When I have this nailed I intend doing as you say, and including the 9 and 11.


    Scott !! Let me know if I'm on the right track here. :bag:
     
  14. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    A tempo...
    Yeah you could can do it like that but when you add the extensions (9, 11, 13) it won't work as well in a single position... so if you want to add the extensions in start to use the whole neck. For example, lets look at a II V I in C and we'll play eight notes per chord. Start on the Dminor it would be D F A C E G B then we would move to the next nearest note in G7 which would be D if we carried on ascending. Then on G7 it would be D F... at this point many players would run out of frets so you'd have to descend etc etc.

    Now if you try this on your bass you'll quickly find that it's quite awkward. So what i like to do is use continuous scale exercises (which i'm going to do a tutorial on within the next couple of weeks) to do the same job. If you look at a D minor arpeggio with all the extensions D F A C E G B what you find is that it is simply a D dorian scale played in thirds... it contains the exact same notes. So by practicing the arpeggio D F A C and the the D Dorian scale your actually taking care of all the harmonic extensions without your brain nearly exploding, lol! So look out for my next tutorial ;)

    Fearceol...
    Yeah man your on the right track. Keep away from starting on the route every time. What you'll actually find is that if you use the continuous arpeggio exercise (as in, play four or eight notes of one arpeggio then move to the next nearest note within the next arpeggio) you'll find that when you move to the nearest note within the next arpeggio it is rarely the route anyway.

    Good luck with the exercises!

    Easy,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  15. A tempo

    A tempo

    May 23, 2010
    Thanks Scott, it was the "brain nearly exploding" part that I was having a problem with, even with this current study. I'm okay with this as long as the operative word doesn't exceed "nearly".
     
  16. Lobster11

    Lobster11 Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    Williamsburg, VA
    Hey Scott,

    I just discovered this thread and watched the videos, and wanted to chime in here with another "thanks" and sign up as a new fan!

    In many ways, there isn't really much "new" in the videos: I already knew (and any good instructor would say) that I ought to practice arpeggios, using a variety of fingerings, in all places up and down the neck, for different chords, in different keys... and then work on tying all those bits together. But, there's something about the way your lessons develop these various components and then tie them together that just rang the bell in my head. It really does solve that incapacitating "brain exploding" problem, and now suddenly I feel like I have a clear plan for practicing that will keep me busy for months.

    As a teacher (not of music, but a college professor) I greatly admire what you've accomplished here. Often times the key to good teaching is not the content itself so much as the manner in which it is developed and explained. Great work, and thanks again!
     
  17. very carefully
     
  18. Andrew Jones

    Andrew Jones Banned

    Feb 28, 2001
    Northampton Mass

    +10000000000000000
     
  19. Mike McGibney

    Mike McGibney Not impossible ... Inevitable

    Apr 13, 2005
    Essex, UK.
    Quoted for truth! Thanks Scott!
     
  20. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Hey guys thanks for the kind words, i'm over the moon that your enjoying the lessons. For as long as i've been teaching I've been interested in the different thought processes that can be used to learn improvisation and the different methods used to teach the same material.

    At the end of the day we only have 12 notes (in western music anyway!), so although this stuff can be complicated at times, generally there's a simple and easy explanation for most things. I truly feel that there is so much confusion out there among students due to a lack of explanation... or over explanation where something simple is made to seem overly complicated and very difficult to grasp. I'm not interested in academia, i just want to show people the most effective way to study and learn the information they need to become a great player.

    Thanks again for checking the lessons out.

    easy,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.