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HOW TO PRACTICE ARPEGGIOS

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by devine, Aug 13, 2010.


  1. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  2. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
    I'm definately still waiting for it. Having too many gigs is a worthy excuse though. Looking forward to the lesson. Thanks for the update. Hey, is there going to be sort of a "continuous" scale exercise like the arpegio thing? Im sorry, Im jumping ahead, Im too excited:hyper:
     
  3. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  4. philbell1978

    philbell1978

    Jan 7, 2011
    Scott... just wanted to say thanks for all the help your tutorials have been giving me. The way you explain things is sooo simple yet a complete killer to get down. I'm at university in London at the moment and all the bass students here are obsessed with your site. You even got a mention in one of our lectures the other day lol!

    Thanks again!

    Phil.
     
  5. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  6. greekorican

    greekorican

    Mar 12, 2009
    I've been playing some guitar lately in an attempt to improve my knowledge of harmony. This lesson is exactly what I've been looking for. Although I know the chord progression of whatever song I'm playing (usually), I've noticed that while I'm actually playing I'm not consciously thinking of the underlying chords. I tend to either autopilot and rely on muscle memory, or think of my line from note to note (A, E, A, A, C, etc.). When called upon to take a bass solo or lay down a sweet bass line over some chords my guitarist is playing I'm totally lost (Minor Pentatonic FTW). This really forced me to concentrate on the current and upcoming chord, as well as where they connect.

    These exercises completely kicked my ass, in a good way. I thought I knew my arpeggios well before I saw this thread. Damn was I wrong. I'm really looking forward to the effect this will have on my playing. Really, thanks man!

    A few questions though:

    1) I've only practiced the first position in C, all I can manage at this point. Where should I go from here? The possibilities seem endless: Learn all 12 keys in first position? Learn all positions in C and go from there? ii V7 I chains?

    2) What's your take on open strings? I noticed you seem to favor 5th fret E string over open A in particular during this exercise. I'm sure it's not a huge difference, but I tend to prefer open strings that are available in certain keys.

    3) Also, you have probably answered this, but I couldn't find it anywhere. Why the glove?

    Thanks again, man! Great lesson!
     
  7. monroe55

    monroe55

    Mar 17, 2009
  8. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Greekorican...
    Glad to hear your getting something from these exercise! To answer your questions...
    1. Stick to that first position for a while and do some jazz standard type tunes with the exercises... like autumn leaves, blue bossa, days of wine and roses, all the things you are etc. Once you can do exercises through some of these tunes try moving up the fret board to the next position with your first finger around the fifth fret, then go through the same tunes you did before. Obviously after that move up again, and so on. From the first to twelfth fret you can get 4/5 positions, then things start to repeat as you get past the twelfth fret. I've been doing these exercises for the last 10 years and they will always be a part of my practice regime. Stick with them and it'll really make a difference to your understanding of harmony on the bass neck.

    2. When doing these exercises its best not to use the open strings. The exercises are going to help you start 'seeing' the arpeggios all over the fingerboard and by not using the open string you will generally only be able to use one of three shapes for any arpeggio. This just means you'll learn the shapes a lot faster. In a real playing situation feel totally free to use open strings!

    3. The glove... I've got a condition called Focal Dystonia. Super complicated so i won't go into it. But basically the glove acts as a sensory trick.

    Thanks again for the questions, any more just post em up!

    Monroe...
    Thanks again for posting up the link. Hope your well.

    Easy guys,

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  9. Great lessons and sound clips, Scott. You seem to motivate many on this thread to the wood shed (myself included). I found you on here months ago and forgot I had your site saved to my favs. Glad I found you again. Well...back to the woodshed. Thanks and keep up the good work. :)
     
  10. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  11. AMp'D.2play

    AMp'D.2play Supporting Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    NJ
    Scott, excellent video lesson on arpeggios. I'm currently *in between* instructors, and this provides a nice roadmap on how/what to practice. Spent over an hour yesterday just on the Cmaj7 in various fingerings. I was thinking I could do one chord a week in all fingerings, but that may be a bit too ambitious.

    I also like how you remind viewers that there are notes in the chord below the root, not just ascending up from the root.

    I'll definitely have to check out your other tutorials down the road. Keep up the great work!

    Anthony D.
     
  12. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
  13. philbell1978

    philbell1978

    Jan 7, 2011
    Scott, have you/do you use a set practice schedule or does it change daily with whatever your working on?

    Cheers,

    Phil.
     
  14. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Hey Phil,

    Yeah i did and do use practice routines... and i stick to them ruthlessly. I'm a bit of a day dreamer so if i didn't, i could literally noodle for hours without practicing a thing. I answered something similar in another thread. Here's what i said...

    ""Anyway... advice...
    Ok, Yeah get a practice routine together and really try to stick to as this is going to be the key to your progress. As you can guess, the harder you practice the faster it all starts coming together. I always aimed for at least 3 hours per day 5 days a week, which at times was a struggle but i was absolutely uncompromising about it so i just made it happen. Some days i'd get up super early just to get a couple of hours in then do another hour later in the day. By practicing like this you begin to rack up an amazing amount of practice hours... 3 hours a day (5 days a week) is 15 hours per week, so thats around 60 hours a month... thats around 720 hours a year! Now you can only start to imagine what will start to happen if you practice 720 hours!!!

    The next thing is what to practice as if your doing 3 hours a day you don't want to be just noodling. I used to split up my routine to focus on separate things. I used to do around an hour on continuous arpeggio exercises and scales, half an hour on technique exercises and then an hour and a half on playing over standards and transcribing what other guys were playing on the same material. When i say transcribing i don't literally mean writing out, i just mean learning their solo or parts of their solo on my instrument. Many times i'd get carried away and spend all day transcribing, soloing over tunes etc but i always made sure i did the strict 3 hours.

    What i also found is that when i'd been doing it for a few weeks it started to become natural and i stopped thinking about it. What you'll probably find is that when you start to do this kind of intense practice it's quite hard to get into it to start with as to keep your concentration levels up is sometimes tough. Also, some of the material your practicing can sometimes be a little boring. Don't worry though, do it for a few weeks and it'll just become part of your everyday routine. I should add... don't feel like you have to do it all at once, you could split it up into 3 one hour sessions if that'd be better for you.

    So to become a good musician... get in the shed! "

    Hope that helps.

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  15. devine you are always a constant source of inspiration to me, not just with the great lessons which are fricken amazing but the whole glove thing, i too have my own physical situation that makes it hard for me to play music, but like you i've found my own accomidations to make up for this so in a word, thanks for the inspiration! and the awesome lessons
     
  16. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons
    Oh man, thanks for the kind words! I guess life sometimes deals you a crappy card. When i was first diagnosed i was told it was the end of my performing career. I wasn't prepared to take that option onboard lol! By complete chance i found that wearing gloves seemed to help me out a lot.

    Thanks again man.

    Scott.

    http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

    http://www.scottdevinemusic.com
     
  17. same thing happened when i became deaf in my right ear, well it was more of me saying it was over than anybody else

    i got over it
     
  18. lowend219

    lowend219

    Sep 17, 2007
    Los Angeles, CA
    this exercise is kicking my butt. guess that means this is exactly what I needed! been at it for a couple of weeks and i'm still working through the ii V I in C major...don't really want move on until that one is mastered to the point where I can hold a conversation while playing it, then I'll move to new keys and standards

    +1 on the rigid practice schedule. I'm not a full time player yet (getting there...) but my other gigs have been slow so I've had lots of time at home to practice and I've been trying to do about 3 hours+ a day. My hour or so of theory/fretboard work used to just sort of be mindlessly running scales and arpeggios, now I work only on the continuous arpeggio exercise in that time and its helping me so much more than just mindlessly running patterns

    Just wanted to say "Thanks" for making this stuff available Scott, your website is a great resource.
     
  19. devine

    devine

    Aug 22, 2006
    Owner: Scott's Bass Lessons

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