How to prevent blowing a speaker???

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Broach_insound, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Broach_insound


    Jan 25, 2005
    New York
    Hey everybody I just recently bought a gallien krueger 410blx cab and a 400rbIV head and I do not want to blow the speakers in it this is my first real rig that I have ever had so I dont know the proper precautions on how loud to turn it up and what not to do with it :confused: I have also heard about slaping when the volume is to high can blow a speaker because the slaping sound is so intense and what not. So if you guy could tell me a little bit about how to prevent this that would be great!

    Thanx ELLIOTT
  2. If the amp doesn't have one, get a limiter for slapping. Even a cheapie limiter pedal will work. Let your ears judge the volume.
  3. Trevorus


    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    If you get clipping, turn down. I reccomend standing away from the cabinet a bit so you can hear yourself better. You'll turn down since you can hear yourself clearly.
  4. There's a lot to it but the easiest way to start is by listening to your rig. If you are hurting your speakers they will let you know with some nasty sounding pops and clicks. On a lesser extent it will sound distorted in a bad way.

    If your amp has a clip light check it out while you're playing. An occasional flash of the light is Ok but if it lights up constantly you are trying to get more volune than your amp can handle. In that case you will be sending a nasty dirty signal to your speakers and they don't like that!
  5. The only sure way I know of to not blow a speaker is don't turn the amp on. ;)
  6. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    At loud gigs, be very careful with the lowest frequencies because they put the most stress on the speakers. If you suspect your rig is near the limit, try boosting low mids and cutting lows (and overall volume if possible.....).
  7. Sonorous


    Oct 1, 2003
    Denton, TX
  8. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    There's really only 2 ways to blow a speaker.

    Speakers are damaged when they move too far! As mentioned, bass frequencies in excess will certainly make speakers move. So if you're not getting enough lows from your rig, be cautious about boosting them with EQ. Instead, look at getting larger diameter speakers to help the 10's along - maybe a 12" or a 15 depending on your preferences and how low you want to go. Even more 10's will help. The more speakers, the more they share the excursion load. But wait and see how you go before getting another cab.

    The other way to blow a speaker is to feed it too much energy. This is where clipping comes in to it. You can often use a 500W amp with a 400w speaker without problems, because your 500w amp isn't producing 500w all the time. However, when an amp is pushed to hard, it will clip the tops off the sine waves and do 2 things. First of all it'll start to distort. Wether or not you hear the distortion depends on how much clipping is going on, and how loud the rest of the band is. At this point your 500w amp is actually putting out more than 500w, which is where the potential problem lies.

    So don't woof your speakers and don't clip, and you should never blow a speaker. And take care of your equipment. Don't let the speakers get wet etc............
  9. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Of course, you can also blow a speaker by feeding it too much power without clipping.
  10. I wonder:
    Is it possible for me to blow my 850w schroeder speaker with my 500 watt thunderfunk?

  11. Possible but highly unlikely, especially under any sane operating conditions. Jack your Low EQ all the way up and then turn both the preamp and master on "10" and play as hard as possible? That might do it...:D
  12. Ok, thanks, I'll give it a shot :D

  13. :D :p
  14. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Yep. I wasn't clear in my original explaination. Feeding too much power, clipped or clean, can induce both types of speaker damage I mentioned earlier. It can make the speaker move too far, it can burn the voice coil, or a combination of both. I concentrated on clipped power because a lot of people don't realise an amp that's clipping sends out more watts than it's rated for.
  15. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Quite true, unfortunately. They ought to put this in every manual to every amp sold!
  16. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    just be careful

    know your amp and speaker. experiment with it and get a feel for where it begins to cause overexcursion or distortion. learn what overdriven speakers and clipping sound like. you can safely find this out with your rig by doing gradual boosts and seeing what the very beginning of your speaker's and amp's limits are (dont just dime it and start slapping! :eek: )
    listen to your amp when gigging and practicing with a band, but be aware that in those contexts you wont always hear it, so you should know beforehand what the limits of your rig are.

    and of course, every once in a while, despite all of our precautions we blow speakers anyway. parts is parts. (and no i havent blown a ton, 2 i can think of in 20 years of gigging) :cool:
  17. joetiii


    Oct 27, 2002
    So the manual of my Soundtech PS802 says I should turn the volume all the way up to get the best s/n ratio. Output is controled by the level control on my Sansamp RBI. RBI has no limit or peak light. PS802 has a peak light, but that only monitors the output of the amp, not the RBI input's clean/distortion.

    In bridged mode, that means a peak of 800 watts into my aggie 1x12 rated at 300 watts. Seems like one small bit of distortion from the preamp could toast my aggie at near max.

    suggestions besides the obvious. turn down@! :eyebrow:
  18. Trevorus


    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL