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How to Properly break in new speakers???

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Happy MurphDay, May 24, 2004.


  1. Happy MurphDay

    Happy MurphDay

    Mar 9, 2004
    around
    After a month, my cab is comming back with freshly loaded 10s but ive never bought a brand new cab before and i have some questions...

    I am curiouse on how to properly break in a new cab, I know you start low and gradually bring up the volume, but how long does it take to be "broken-in"?

    Should you use a single tone, or do you use a cd player, how long till you add more volume?

    thanks alot for helping me get the most out of my cab
     
  2. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
    I've never heard of breaking speakers.
     
  3. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    The norm is about 2 hours of low/moderate volume. You don't want to just crank it and wank it.
     
  4. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    I don't think you've got anything to worry about. Speakers do not require a breaking in time, although they do change in tone to longer you play them. Keep in mind that they have been tested at the factory, so it's not like they've never been played before.
     
  5. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    every new cabinet I have gotten in the last two years has a little disclaimer on startup. They all have said it's about a 2 hours seating process with new speakers. I do as I am told when I spend that kinda money.
     
  6. You don't need to 'break in' speakers. They will change a bit over time because the surrounds become more compliant, but there's absolutely no reason why you can't plug and play immediately. They've already been run pretty hard in the testing phase at the factory....
     

  7. From what manufacturers? I've been working with high end PA systems for years and I've never seen a pro manufacturer make that disclaimer. The makers of raw drivers don't mention it either.
     
  8. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    In all the Eden manuals that I have they all say the same thing. I doubt that every cabinet is pushed at the factories. That is a hell of a job I would like to have. They are probably hooked to an amp and "bump, bump" it works and it's carted up.

    Not trying to being difficult, just stating what Eden tells me and if I just spent 1000 on a cabinet, I am listening.
     
  9. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    Straight from the Eden XST/XLT/XL/T manual:

    WARNING! : BREAK-IN PERIOD
    We recommend that you use your Eden cabinet at low to moderate volume levels for approximately two hours before using it in a high volume situation. This will allow the voice coils to "seat" themselves.

    I knew I wasn't high.
     
  10. Happy MurphDay

    Happy MurphDay

    Mar 9, 2004
    around
    well thanks freakin!, i do that to car subs, so i was trying to see if it applied to bass cabs aswell. but thanks alot
     
  11. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
  12. There are some speaker cabinet manufacturer's (Eden and especially Acme) that use speakers with unusually stiff surrounds. If you just plug in and bang away, you can crease the surrounds, detach voice coils, and pull cones apart. There are some makers that pre-condition their speakers prior to shipment by sending a single-tone through them for a few hours, but that's very time consuming and can get very old for cab makers.

    All the advice I've been given is to just play a few cd's through a new cabinet at above-average listening volumes. Not too loud, but not too soft, gradually increasing the volume every 1/2 hour or so. Just get the cones moving a bit and the materials will break in nicely.

    Check with LonnyBass about breaking speakers. He'll have an opinion.
     
  13. I'd consider that a design/manufacturing flaw. If the surround is so stiff in a new cab that you can't run it full on but it softens up enough in 2 hours of moderate use that you can, there's something wrong with the surround. How soft is it going to be in 5 years? Eden's speakers are possibly the most compliant 10s I've ever encountered so I'm not sure I buy the unusally stiff surround thing anyway....

    I've spent a lot of time as systems engineer on Meyer, EAW, EV, VDOSC etc. gear and it doesn't need to be broken in. Neither do raw drivers from B&C, RCF, JBL or Eminence.

    At any rate, if the manufacturer suggests you do it, do it so you're safe for any possible warranty situations.
     
  14. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
  15. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    eh,

    slamming 800 watts into a new cab is asking for trouble, IMHO.

    would you test the 0-60mph accel times with *your* brand new car? :meh:

    sure you can do it, and no one will stop you, but will you adversely affect your car in the long run[/]? i'd think so.
     



  16. The car analogy isn't really applicable. There are a lot more moving parts in a car than in a speaker. Most speakers do not need any break in time. If the manufacturer suggests break in, then I think you should respect that, but unless it's explicitly stated, there isn't any reason to do it.
     
  17. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Not to mention that in a car, many of the moving parts are in contact with non-moving parts or parts moving in a different way, many times separated only by a film of oil. These are the things that really "break in" in the initial period of driving.

    In a loudspeaker, OTOH, if moving parts are rubbing, it's a defect. ;)

    I agree with Mark, in general, loudspeakers don't need breaking in. I would hope that the drivers have gone through QC and thus have had their surrounds and spiders flexed to break away any initial stiffness that may be a result of the manufacturing process. But from within the first minute or so of using the loudspeaker until the driver just starts deteriorating on its way to needing reconing, I would expect the loudspeaker's performance to be fairly stable.
     
  18. Passinwind

    Passinwind I Know Nothing Supporting Member

    At least one guitar speaker manufacturer does: Ted Weber at webervst.com.

    I've seen recommendations to "condition" speakers with a low volume sine wave, or sometimes a sweep, for various amounts of time. This was always in regard to guitar speakers though.

    In any case, I'm with you. I've installed and worked with many brand new high end pieces myself, and none of those guys ever mentioned a break-in period.
     
  19. adam on bass

    adam on bass Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2002
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Spector, GK, EMG and D'Addario
    All I said was, I do as I am told when I spend that kinda money.
     
  20. Happy MurphDay

    Happy MurphDay

    Mar 9, 2004
    around
    thanks alot for all your input, now i can rock out to the fullest ASAP!!!