How to properly re-finish a Warwick and repair a 'too long' screw...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Rattanee, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. Rattanee

    Rattanee

    Oct 31, 2017
    EU, Hungary
    Hello folks, I hope someone can share their expertise with me.

    I just bought a W Buzzard BO 5 pretty cheap. I love the shape of the thing, and for the price I cannot complain, but unfortunately it is cherry red, not a natural satin finish. How deep does the stain go on these things? Is it possible to polish it off with 1000-2000 grit sandpaper or does it run so deep it'd take a substantial layer of wood to get rid of the colour? If so, after sanding and polishing, would I just treat it with linseed oil to get the same finish as the original ?

    The other problem, the reason I got it cheap I suspect, when it was last shipped disassembled, someone lost one of the neck screws, and screwed in a regular chipboard screw, just three or so mm too long. This caused a thin strand from the fretboard to lift where the screw is. This is not under a fret nor under a string luckily, and it is just barely lifted, so even if I pull it off, that little crater won't affect anything. HOWEVER... I prefer to repair as best as possible. My idea is to inject a bit of wood glue under the lifted strand, cover with tissue paper, and clamp firm with a piece of wood to get that strand back in place. Once the glue is set, I'd go about with 1000 grit sandpaper to get any glue or tissue paper residue off and get the fretboard perfectly smooth again. Does this sound like a workable method (I've done this with bigger surfaces with satisfactory results), or is there a better way to fix this?

    Thanks for any of your insisght in advance!
     
  2. Stumbo

    Stumbo Guest

    Feb 11, 2008
    Do you have the correct length screw?
     
  3. Rattanee

    Rattanee

    Oct 31, 2017
    EU, Hungary
    Under acquisition. Should have a new one tomorrow if the local luthier has the same size. I took the chipboard screw out and tossed it on the spot. I removed the screw next to it (that was still original and the same length) and put it in place of the chipboard screw just to check if the wood was healthy before buying. It's nice and snug, so at least the bore isn't screwed up (HA watta pun! :) ).
     
  4. Rattanee

    Rattanee

    Oct 31, 2017
    EU, Hungary
    Here is a photo of the problem. It looks a little smaller then it actually is because of the flash, plus I gently pushed it back so it doesn't protrude as much as it did before removing the incorrect screw.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. I don’t know what’s available in Hungary but I would use waxed paper, it won’t stick to the wood or glue.

    As far as the body, it depends on if the color is actually stain or is in the finish. My guess would be that the red is part of the finish and would sand off with sanding the finish off. I will, however, defer to the local Warwick experts.

    Edit: I menant to say that my guess would be that the red is a tint in one of the finish coats and not stain applied to the wood. Obviously, it’s part of the finish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
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  6. Ross W. Lovell

    Ross W. Lovell

    Oct 31, 2015

    What's the purpose of the tissue paper?

    I'd use a piece of nylon. It bends and conforms and doesn't absorb the glue.

    I think you'll be fine, but be careful with that drywall screw, they snap easily.

    Going to guess the red stain is likely to be pretty deep.

    Good score, good luck!
     
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  7. Rattanee

    Rattanee

    Oct 31, 2017
    EU, Hungary
    The idea for tissue was exactly that it absorbs the excess glue and doesn't let it run so far along the surface of the wood. Actually wax paper or nylon both sound easier to peel off, I have not thought of that, on the other hand, will those not let the glue spread undeneath more and coat the surface of the fretboard more broadly? Since this is wenge and somewhat porose, not sure how easy that would be to deal with. Somehow I think the tissue pőaper might make it easier to peel off the excess glue. What do you think?

    Oh I know all about drywall screws... (someone replaced one of the straplock screws with one on my Thumb... was -not- happy when it broke off five mms inside the body! But got a Luthier to sort that with as minimal damage to the body as you can, fortunately.) This was a wood-screw/chipboard screw though, the bronze colour stuff. I'm not sure of the proper term in english for it. It's what you use when building furniture, so somewhat more sturdy. It came out no problems and it's already in the trash :D

    As for the finish, I actually noticed a bit of a wearspot on one corner so it's probably not that deep, but now I'm hesitant, not sure if I could sand it all off without accidentally going too deep here or there. There's lots of odd curves here....
     
  8. Rattanee

    Rattanee

    Oct 31, 2017
    EU, Hungary
    Okay so I read up on suggested repairs, and ended up going with crazy glue for the fretboard. I lifted that little strand of wood from the side, dropped a single drop of glue under, then used a clamp and a small bar of metal wrapped in teflon tape to push it back in place.
    After that, used a piece of 1000 grit sandpaper to clean off the tiny bit of excess glue left. It came out so good, if you don't know it's there, you will never spot it!
    To finish up I deep-cleaned the fretboard and frets, using Magic Erasers to return the frets to a decent shine (they were very matted). I need to buy some oil to treat the fretboard after this torture, but overall I am very pleased with the result!

    I -think- I also decided not to re-finish the bass, rather I will replace all the chrome bits with gold hardwarwe and a brass JANIII. That should accent the cherry red colour nicely.
     
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