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HWY 1 P bass info

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by zackthompson, Aug 5, 2012.


  1. zackthompson

    zackthompson Endorsing Artist: MJC Ironworks Strings Supporting Member

    Jul 18, 2011
    Virginia Beach
    What's the story behind the HWY 1 basses. Are the pickups in them american or mexican?
     
  2. Troph

    Troph

    Apr 14, 2011
    Kirkland, WA
    That diagram is incorrect on several points for my 2010/2011 Highway One, so I'm not convinced it's very accurate for newer models. Perhaps it's correct for older models.

    For example, the diagram shows a standard bridge, whereas my bass came pre-installed with a "Badass II" high-mass bridge. The diagram shows a standard single-capacitor high-pass filter tone circuit, but mine came with a more complicated "Greasebucket" circuit.

    I have no clue what type of pickups are on mine (I haven't removed them to find a part number), but they were advertised as "Vintage Alnico Magnet Precision Bass Single Coil Pickup". They are almost certainly different from the MIM models, which I believe use ceramic bar magnets. But they also aren't the same as the newer American Standard series, which is clearly advertised as using the Custom Shop '60s pickups.

    The good news is, mine sounds great for pretty much everything except metal. I feel absolutely no incentive to replace the pickups.

    The biggest problem I had was fret edge sprout. I sent one back thinking I got a bad one, but the second one was possibly even worse. I just spent the $40 to have a pro dress the fret edges, and now it's my favorite Precision neck.

    I added some GHS Precision Flats, and it's a fantastic instrument. I plan to hang on to it for a long time.
     
  3. gigslut

    gigslut

    Dec 13, 2011
    St Louis, Mo
    Highway 1 and Highway One are different models. Highway One superseded the Highway 1 with several design changes.
     
  4. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    I've answered this question numerous times.

    The Highway One (nominally) uses the same pickups as its contemporary American Standard.

    The final Highway Ones used the 61276/7 set (though I've seen some with different pickup substitutions from the factory), same as the American Standard of the time. Previous models used the 56003/4 set as in the American.

    The current American Standards have OVs instead of the 61276/7 set, and the Highway One is long gone.
     
  5. Troph

    Troph

    Apr 14, 2011
    Kirkland, WA
    I've never heard this before, but if it's true, it's one of the worst product naming changes in history. :eyebrow:

    I'm certain that 99% of people who own these basses and try selling them don't know there is a difference between "1" and "One". So it would be better just to go off the model year.

    Incidentally, Fender stopped production of the Highway 1/One series basses apparently in late 2010 or early 2011. I'm guessing they were hurting sales of their American Standard series... more features for less money.
     
  6. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    You must be new here! ;)

    It is.

    They're FMIC! Bonehead marketing is who they are. :scowl:

    This is still a mystery.

    Supposedly, according to what FMIC told me, I got some of the last, final run of Highway One basses made, in the spring of 2011. All were shipped and sold.

    Mysteriously, a big batch of them showed up again for GC/MF/M123 in late autumn and maybe another run later -- long after they were discontinued and dropped from the catalog.
     
  7. tastybasslines

    tastybasslines Banned

    May 9, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    I wouldn't be so sure. You would know if you wanted to change out the Badass 2 for a standard bridge, which alot of owners do. I knew what the differences were before I got my HWY One P, which I very much love. Us bassists are actually more informed than we look. :bag:
     
  8. Troph

    Troph

    Apr 14, 2011
    Kirkland, WA
    I guess so... But sometimes that has advantages.

    I'm going to stand my ground on this one. Maybe some owners here at TB know the complete history of the model they purchased, and the exact years when Fender started making changes and changed "1" to "One", and even the model numbers of the pickups. But on your local Craigslist, you're lucky if the seller can even tell you what year the instrument was made. :)

    BTW, even the 30-page "Official Highway One Club" thread here at TB doesn't mention the "1" vs "One" distinction, and if you read through the thread, people regularly interchange the "1" and "One" even when referring to similar model years. I'm confident that most people who own this bass have no idea of the distinction. But they can certainly recognize major differences like the bridge.
     
  9. tjh

    tjh Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2006
    Minnesota
    ... FWIW, I got tired of trying to correct the incorrect usage of the terminology that occurs on here ... even after the correction is made in the thread, people still call it by its misnomer ... so I quit ...

    ... I think gigslut has taken over the duties as the official 'informer' :)

    ... this lack of clear name change has made several folks a LOT of money on Ebay ... you will see all kinds of the Hwy 1's being sold by both uninformed and unscrupulous folk cashing in on the lack of understanding ... the Hwy 1 was officially changed mid year 2006 to the 'upgraded' Hwy ONE, and the price went up in some cases $3-400 from the clearance priced Hwy 1's ... I bought an '05 Hwy 1 in '06 being clearanced for just under $400 shipped, brand new ...I watched one identical being listed, and sold for over $700 shipped on Ebay earlier this year ... of course the seller did everything in his power to NOT note the fact that it was the earlier version ...
     
  10. IIRC, the HWY1 models have 2 capasitors and one resistor soldered on the tone pot. Don't know if any other Fender bass does this.
     
  11. tjh

    tjh Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2006
    Minnesota
    ... also know as GreaseBucket circuitry, or GreaseBucket tone control ...

    ... and yes, SOME of the Hwy 1's had this, as the very initial run did not (2003, the introductory year for the Highway 1 series basses) ... from then on, the Highway 1 series utilized GreaseBucket tone controls all the way through the transition into a COMPLETELY DIFFERENT MODEL called the Highway ONE which was introduced mid year 2006... actually, this is probably one of the few things shared between the two COMPLETELY DIFFERENT series ... :)

    .. and yes, another Fender bass also comes stock with Greasebucket tone controls ... the American Specials
     
  12. tastybasslines

    tastybasslines Banned

    May 9, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    The American Specials is basically the rebranding of the Highway One basses. They had to do away with them...you were basically getting an American Standard with more features.
     
  13. tjh

    tjh Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2006
    Minnesota
    .. yes, the American Special did replace the Highway ONE Series in the Fender line-up, and yes, it does share many of the components that were on the Highway ONES ...

    ... but you lost me if I am reading that you are saying they elimated the Highway Series because they offered more features on it (Highway Series) than on an American Standard ... ??

    .. just a quick compare of Hwy ONE Series and current AmStand .. AmStand has FAR superior tuners, they had virtually the same necks, pups were a crapshoot, because they were tossing AmStand pups in the P's at the end ... AmStand uses conventional electronics where Hwy Series the less desireable Greasebucket circuitry ... Hwy's came with a white p/g, AmStands nice tort (etc), the bridge/body on the AmStand is STB or top load ... Hwy Series offered the BAII which were getting hard to come by for a while and prices were way over inflated on used ones ... and the AmStand comes with a very nice $125 SKB case with TSA locks, Hwy Series a gig bag ...

    ... from what I can tell from the new components that appeared on the AmSpecs, they eliminated the Hwy Series to get away from the BAII, shooting a nitro finish, and to introduce a 'new series' to justify (camouflage) a price increase on a product ... I am not sure where you are suggesting that the Hwy Series had more features than the AmStands .. it looks to me like the powers to be at Fender just wanted an item in that slot with a better bottom line ... just my take on it ..
     
  14. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    i have a 2009 highway one and i was wondering what strings you guys use, been using exl170s, which seem pretty good, but i have been thinking about hi beams, because they work so well on my sb-2
     
  15. Troph

    Troph

    Apr 14, 2011
    Kirkland, WA
    Just set aside some $$ and try several different varieties. You'll get a million different opinions on strings, and frankly I think string choice is one of the most personal decisions on an instrument. It helps define "your" sound. Make a log of your findings, or better yet, record yourself so you can do some A-B comparisons later.

    In general, on a P neck I prefer beefier strings. I had D'Addario EXL170s on a different instrument and thought they were a bit light and lacked deep low-end punch, personally.

    If you like flats, I've been really happy with GHS Precision flats. They're silky smooth on my Hwy One P neck, and I can get a really good R&B tone from the instrument. In my experience, they're better than either Fender flats or D'Addario Chromes. (I haven't tried TI strings yet, but I hear good things.) I don't do any slapping with this setup, but it's my favorite neck to play.

    On my other P (which in full disclosure has Duncan Basslines pups), I have an older set of Rotosound 66 stainless (RS66LD), which have a lot more attack, but aren't overly bright now (they took a couple months to mellow out a bit). The slap tone in particular is excellent. I usually get compliments on my tone on this rig more than others. The Roties are pretty rough on the fingers and frets, though. So much so that I'm not sure they're a good idea long-term.
     
  16. gigslut

    gigslut

    Dec 13, 2011
    St Louis, Mo
    If you prefer the GHS to Chromes, you probably won't like the TIs. I've tried all three and have GHS and Chromes currently on basses. The Chromes are between the GHS and TI tonally. The TI are also the lightest gauge of the three.
     
  17. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    thanks, i'll stick with the exl170s on the jazz and try something new for the p
     
  18. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    I'm not sure I get your point. Ignorance is more pervasive and therefore better? :confused:
     
  19. Gringo Starr

    Gringo Starr

    Apr 21, 2012
    NWI
    I know this is going to sound like one of those cliche TB answers but I put a set of Hi-Beams on my Highway One P right after I bought it and it sounded 150% better with them. I'd think Rotos would work well also.
     

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