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I also got a tune up now...

Discussion in 'Recordings [DB]' started by Lovebown, Jun 9, 2004.


  1. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    ... at Damon's site...

    The tune is called 'Chefs Blues', and is a slow blues with somewhat altered changes that I wrote a couple months ago. It's a live recording from a "gig" at my school where we had our graduation project (which was basically playing a few tunes in front of an audicene and recording it with a MD)

    The sound quality isnt that good unfortunately..

    oh well.. besides certain f***-ups during the 4's and so forth Im pretty pleased with this take... feel free to flame away.

    /Lovebown AKA Peder Waern

    PS. The song isn't up yet, and Damon will probably add it when he has time...
     
  2. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Way ta go, Bone!
     
  3. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    So.. now it's up. Please give it a listen and flame away please...

    /lovebown
     
  4. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    I wish I could listen to some of this stuff on better speakers than my computer has. Maybe I'll download to CD and take it home for a more in depth critique, but for first impressions...

    First of all, I wish I had been able to sound like this when I was, what, 19? I have some recordings of my playing (on electric) from then and it's not pretty. You're getting off to a great start.

    I'll talk a little about your solo approach when I get to listen a little closer, but my main concern with the ensemble playing is that you guys don't really seem to be listening to each other very much. The drummer is "trying" stuff, you're "trying" stuff, but it doesn't seem to be in response to anything that's happening in the music. There are some sections in the trumpet solo where s/he is providing material that the rhythm section could really jump on, if you wanted to break it up, but nothing happens. In sections that would really push forward if the ryhthm section would dig in and play as a unit, that seems to be a particular point where the drummer likes to play his "Tony Williams' ****". My recommendation would be for you and the drummer to work on just getting the quarter notes to hook up. If you build that simple, solid foundation the band is going to swing more and responding to directions that the soloist or accompanist suggest is going to be that much easier.So build a quarter note line without skips and triplets and grace notes and ghost notes and pedal rhythms. Work on your quarter note melody, you stand a better chance of getting the forward momentum going with meaningful note choices than with these sorts of rhythmic "interruptions" to the flow. Don't let your conception of what you want to have happen interfere with what is actually happening.

    You get to where you can play a solid quarter note line that makes sense, you're gonna be the workingest bass player wherever you are.
     
  5. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    That'd be great...
    Ok.... thanks
    *sigh* Yeah, I see what you mean. To be honest with you he's not my favourite drummer to play with because of this reason that you mention.
    and I can also relate to the other stuff you're saying..
    OK, point taken. I'll keep that in mind. With this drummer it might be a bit hard though, but I see what you mean.

    When I practice on my own I try to do quarter-note excercises against a nome and so forth.

    Uhuh... exactly what is not making sense to you? My choice of rhythm or the notes? both?

    K....thanks a lot Ed.. and anyone else who wants to jump in feel free!!

    /lovebown
     
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Well, the notes. I don't hear a "melodic" line developing in your comp. It's kinda what I keep going round and round with Bruce about, with the whole "chord/scale" thang. Choosing notes from an available "set" isn't the same thing as developing a line that has direction and intent. You aren't choosing a note because it's available for a ii7 chord, you're playing THAT NOTE RIGHT THERE because of its relation to the note before it and the one coming after it because they are the ones you are hearing in your line that is developing through the tune that's unfolding.

    Maybe when you get together with your drummer, practice walking through several choruses of tunes with you just playing quarters and him just playing quarters on his ride cymbal. It's going to start off sounding really mechanical, but being pushed out there with nothing else to hang the tune on but an unembellished quarter note line, your ear really starts suggesting melodic fragments. And the more you do this, the more the fragments start linking up and the more they start linking up, before you know it you are building lines that arc through several choruses rather than just chord to chord to chord or even 12 bar form to 12 bar form to 12 bar form.
    And THEN when you put the soloist and accompanist back into the mix, all of a sudden you have more material to choose from, ideas to support or follow- a conversation. Which sounds like what you want to get to, a conversational exchange between all the players?
     
  7. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Please let me add, this is NOTHING to feel weird or bad about. I was a working bass player for a number of years and had a line that had absolutley NO sense to it (and unfortunately have the recordings to prove it). I was just picking notes out of a hat. I had an alright swing feel and pretty good time, but adding this dimension of INTENT and MEANING to the notes just gives this real sense of authority to your line, your time, your sound. It sounds like you mean to play every single note you play.
    And this is something that I am currently working on now, too. The deeper you get, the deeper there is to go.
     
  8. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Yeah ok. Just for refererence, do you have an example of a walking bass line where this sort of "intent" is evident? An example of you playing is fine, but perhaps even better with someone "famous" so I can get to listen to a recording? I've heard you mention Lee Konitz "Motion" which i have in my record collection?!

    /lovebown
     
  9. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    YES! That's a great record. Check out particularly SOnny's line behind Lee on YOU'D BE SO NICE TO COME HOME TO, I think it's the turnaround from the first ending of the 3rd chorus that he plays this beautiful little melody, it only happens to be all quarter notes. But PC on a lot of that Red Garland Trio stuff, Scotty on SERPENT'S TOOTH and NO GREATER LOVE from THE ARRIVAL OF VICTOR FELDMAN, all great examples.
     
  10. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    I'll check those out...and lisetning to Motion right now.
    So.. do you have anything to say about my solo?

    /lovebown
     
  11. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    San Francisco, CA
    To add some more to what Ed had to say:

    1) Something seems to really get lost during the pianists solo. Like maybe you and the drummer can come together better to support him. It feels to me that maybe there's too much going on, especially with the guitarist in the background and it's all not sync'ing together. Feels like the rhythm section is going 3 separate directions. I could almost do without the guitar comping on the piano solo. It sounds like he's doing mostly shell chords and not adding much to the sound.

    2) Maybe to help the melody thing, play with more 2-feel. I don't think I heard any 2-feel playing in your recording other in the beginning head. You can probably say more by playing less. Maybe add somma dat to your soloing too, like more breathing and space in the solo to make the phrases clearer.

    Good job tho. I wish I could play like that right now. Soon enough I spose. hehe.
     
  12. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Thanks for the critique, hdiddy!
    keep it comin'..

    /lb
     
  13. I liked the tune, really nice. I feel a bit more concerned about the drummer, he seems to play too many fills (for my taste) and sometimes it feels like the time is going to drop, but you hold it down well (from what I've learned it's the #1 skill we bassists need). I dug the solo, really nice, really tasteful. I think others have made better points so I will stop now.