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I am PuRe noob with the DB

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Xribble, Jan 28, 2003.


  1. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    :confused: where do i start???? :confused:

    1- don't own a DB......only it's cousin the guitar....
    2-don't even know the tunning for the DB
    3-and all the links refer to usa sites....

    would anyone be kind enough to post some info where i can buy a decent DB...starter style...but here up north...in Canuckstan....

    :confused: or is it too cold to play a DB in Canada....

    just a tad of humour....l;)l...with the spot of tea

    XXXribble
     
  2. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    What is it with all the Canadians around here? Seems like we're everywhere.

    Noobie, you're out east in the old golden triangle where everybody is! You can find a DB, easy. I'm not familiar with any local string dealers out there, but what about Long & McQuade, Steve's Music, etc? L&M used to do rental around here when there were actually strings programs in the schools.

    If you can rent one first it makes the finances a little easier.

    There was an Ottawa guy posted here a coupla weeks ago asking about waiting for the bus outside with his bass in the winter. Maybe hop in the car, go for a spin, and see if you can find that dude. He's the one wrapped in a parka, not the one wrapped in a bass bag. If he's still breathing, he might be thinking piccolo by now.
     
  3. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Same as the bottom 4 strings of your friend the guitar - EADG :) None of those wussy frets, though... :D
     
  4. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    :cool: :cool:

    I'm off to sucess just need to rent one and away I go....

    Tx guys!!! ;)
     
  5. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    That woulda been me... and no... I haven't picked up the piccolo yet :)

    Xribble, just how "starter" are you thinking? I have seen a few DB's around for $1000 or so, but those are hopelessly crappy. I think your best bet might be to rent one for starters. Check out Peter Dawson's Fiddle Factory (near Carling and Bronson). He rents basses for about 75 bucks a month.

    Other places you might want to check out are Karoly Loso's Violins and Peter Mach Luthiery.
     
  6. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    omg.........:eek:

    that exactly how i got it....86$ with taxes....at Peter Dawson Violin.........man i LOVE it!!!!!!

    Holy ****....i never thought it was so easy.....well..I did play guitar for five years.....and love to slap a bess when i can........

    I taped the equivalent of the fret positions......are you classic guys against me putting guides for starters????

    1 - otherwise you need great tunning to start with...(love that low E string...)
    2 - combined with an excellent ear...and precision sliding...........:D


    I've noticed that the guitar hurts your fingers cause the stings are too small.....with the DB......it hurts way more cause of the friction when sliding..........

    but i was wondering if you guys know of a TONE GENERATOR software...or a PERFECT EAR TRAINING software????

    i need to work on that now......and right fingerings...

    but man.....this site offers much to starters......espceially positions, sitting and standing...and the tunning is soooooo important.....:D
     
  7. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    i would advise against markers. The best bet will be for you to learn good hand position <b>and</b> train your ear. A good teacher can be invaluable for this.

    The better your ear ( at identifying intervals, chords) the better your intonation on the bass.

    I have found that the markers provide a crutch that is hard to overcome when they come off.

    just IMO.
     
  8. Sam Sherry

    Sam Sherry Inadvertent Microtonalist Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2001
    Portland, ME
    Euphonic Audio "Player"
    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER
    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER
    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER
    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER
    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER

    Don't reinvent the wheel. Don't hurt yourself. It will be fun.

    XRIBBLE: GET A TEACHER
     
  9. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    heheheeeee......

    Well I'm just real quick at learning stuff...and love the challenge of getting it myself...that's all.....just real hard headed.....I guess...;)

    Well, let me tell you...I waited 5 years before i got my notes on my guitar and wow jazz.....everything is soo much easier......

    So I say.....even if you do have the guides on a guitar or even more needed on a DB.....having them on and playing it, is another thing....but it might be hard later on.....but hey I'm a survivor......

    BTW...i never took any lessons before.....and kind of scared to do so.......I've learned everything by ear and with the incredible NET.....just because I love it.....not because I'm the next star......all theoretical people can't play without their partitions, then you ask them to improv and he asked you in what key it is......

    i'm in for it now......ouch.....lol

    now that's funny guys.......musicians huh??
     
  10. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    I was also going to say GET A TEACHER many times too. You may have played lots of other instruments before but believe me it is very important to get a teacher with DB. If you don't, you may well develop all kinds of bad habits as well as hurting yourself.

    Adam (thrash_jazz) and I both study with the same teacher here in Ottawa. He's da man when it comes to DB and we can put you in touch with him if you want.

    Also, my $0.02 - the rentals from Peter Dawson are not always setup well so the bass may be harder to play and crappier sounding than it could be.

    As far as guides on the fingerboard, there are those for and against it. It's certainly bad if it stops you from getting into the habit of listening.

    Adrian
     
  11. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    Xribble, I'm not one to bust your b*lls about getting a teacher, even though it is the most sensible advice anyone can offer you at this point. Depends what you want out of music and how well you treat your body.

    But, that quote up there from you, dude, is gibberish. If it means what I think it means (theory guys are all head and can't play real music) then you better watch your butt when you show up to play with real musicians. They'll chew you up, man. They are going to know an honest-to-goodness language, and all you're going to know is the pidgin version. Guess what type of musician is in a better position to say what they want to say on their axe?

    I can dig a go-for-it attitude, but if you mix it with disrespect, you're asking for it.
     
  12. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Amen Damon. I think its too convenient to discount someone's knowledge because you can't speak their language.

    Theory gives you a context and language for something that 'sounds cool'. It allows you to understand *why something sounds cool* - and just as often as not the 'why' is because you are breaking the 'rule'. In other words, I don't think theory builds 'partitions' but rather teaches you where people traditionally place partitions and allows you to understand how to successfully build (among other things) the tension for the listener between what they expect to hear and what you choose to play.

    Also, you need to be able to show up and be able to explain the structure of a tune if you want other to be able to play along quickly. For a solo/vamp type song this isn't always necessary, but if you are playing with high quality musicians and want to play something complex, you had better be able to write it down or explain it, because they aren't going to give you the benefit of the doubt. They will assume you don't know what you are talking about if you indeed don't know how to express musicality verbally or in writing.
     
  13. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Another thing - just to emphasize, you can't free your mind from these structures until you understand them. Xribble, your post sounds like you want to think about music ahistorically - that is, as if you had a blank slate to work with for unconfined creativity.

    That just aint the case - you are pre-conditioned by your environment to hear music a certain way, for certain scales to sound correct, etc. FOr instance, when people started flatting the 3rd and 7th in the blues, it probably sounded wrong or odd to most average joes (lke you or me). When Bach threw some flatted sevenths into his music it was a similar reaction. The way you hear things is a product of your cultural context, and it changes gradually. I remember when I first heard the Sex Pistols and thought it was sheer headache inducing noise. Now it sounds like excellent rock and roll, albeit a bit tame. What you hear is subjective, and cultural, not ahistorical.

    So why not understand that context? Theory allows you to do so, and understand what you are embracing and what you are rejecting.
     
  14. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    Tx guys!!!

    I'm just so enthousiatic...I can play and jam with a lot of songs...right now......but it's the fingering I need to work on.....

    I'm just glad I found my instrument!!! I'm playing day and night.....but can it really hurt you????

    And an explanation, I'm just jealous that I never got music classes....and had to learn everything myself, the hassles of trial and effort...and right tunning damn it....

    Ya the DB I have right now on rental sucks....I think cause i play for 5 mins, then goes..out of wack..(tunning wise)....I keep my keyboard real close for perfect tunning.....:cool:

    Once again I did'nt want to insult you guys by saying theory dudes suck, I just don't feel up to par...and you know the rest!!!:D
     
  15. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Yes you can hurt yourself or injure yourself so that you won't be able to play. Believe me, it's more than just fingering that you need to learn. Like many other folks, I came to DB with experience on many other instruments. DB is a big world and a lot of it is not written down or is very hard to communicate correctly in any way except with a teacher. I consider myself quite an experienced musician and used to teach (piano) myself. I mostly direct my lessons and even though I only average a two hour lesson every three to four weeks, they are vital to my development to ensure that I don't develop any bad habits and to give me lots of good pointers and tips.

    Your DB, especially if it is a plywood rental, shouldn't be going out of tune that much unless you are moving it around a lot between environments where the temperature and humidity varies (such as bringing it in from the cold) or if the strings are really new and still stretching.

    Adrian
     
  16. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    well it's weird I play for 5 mins. and notice the note is not where it was when I started.....I hate it...but I can still manage in between...songs....

    actually I'm now looking for a teacher and it might be a she.....coolness.....:cool:

    what kinds of pain can you develop...cause I feel the guitarists pain but now stretching more often not to tighten up...
     
  17. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Well, since playing DB requires you to use pretty much your whole upper body (which electric bass certainly doesn't do), you will be using your muscles in ways you probably haven't before (I especially felt it in my fingers and forearms).

    I would also recommend a teacher for DB. I'm not saying it isn't possible to learn on your own, but there are too many subtleties to proper DB technique to pick up without help. As mentioned, there's the chance you could injure yourself, too.

    As far as playing in tune goes, I have found a good way to do this to be playing along with CD's or pre-programmed bass tracks. Scale and arpeggio practice is an even better way to get the notes under your fingers and to "hear" where they are.

    Just a few ideas anyway... I'm sure the more experienced folk can offer more insight than I can! :)
     
  18. Xribble

    Xribble

    Jan 28, 2003
    Ottawa, Canada
    :) Oh ya for sure.....I need to get the band-in-abox program again, so I can jam to different syles and put in the chords I want...

    I'm jamming some Jethro Tull, some Jimi Hendrix, Chick Corea and Keith Jarrett smooth songs......

    Jamming with music helps you conceptualize the sylte and mood of playing you need to fallow....

    :D
     
  19. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Don't take them off then!! :D
     
  20. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    never used them in the first place.:rolleyes: