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I CAN STUDY STURDY CABINETS... WITH YOUR HELP TEAM TALKBASS!

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by basstark, Oct 8, 2004.


  1. basstark

    basstark

    Jun 6, 2004
    Hello one and all! i need some help and thought of some perfect info for the talk bass archives (i like to think ahead). Here i am, i, who doesnt know anything about the features of different bass cabinets and their purposes, benefits and draw backs (types of wood, folded reflex, fired from inside, insulation etc. ). I was hoping that some helpful talkbassers could maybe post pictures of cabs and maybe some sorts of accompanying explanation or diagrams or something. Links to sites that have this info would be awesome too. Im not too concerned with the differences of brands but mainly the differences of features. What makes a cab well made? thanks!
     
  2. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    well to get you started..............
    Cabinets have specs which can tell tyou some important information about them.
    Any cabinet will have an impedance rating (measured in ohms) which helps you match them to an amplifier and determine how many you can use with a given amplifier, as well as how many watts a given amplifier will be able to put into them. Typical impedance ratings will be 4 ohms or 8 ohms, with the occasional cabinet that is rated at 16 ohms, 5.3 ohms, or 2 ohms.
    The cabinet will also have an RMS power handling rating (measured in watts) and usually a peak power handling rating. These tell you how many watts the cabinet can handle on average (RMS rating) and during short "peaks" or transients (peak rating). RMS isn't really an "average", but for basic purposes it is ok to think of it as such.
    A cabinet will have a sensitivity rating measured as dB at 1 kHz @ 1 watt @ 1 meter. The higher the sensitivity rating the louder the cabinet will be. A cabinet with a sensitivity rating 3 dB lower than another cabinet will need twice the wattage to be as loud as the cabinet with the higher sensitivity rating.
    Cabinets will aslo have a frequency response rating. These are generally useless if they don't include a tolerance measured in dB + and -. A typical frequency response rating might be 50 Hz - 12 kHz +/- 3 dB, -6 dB @ 45 Hz.
    Despite the specs, all cabinets are voiced differently , so cabinets with identical specs won't sound the same so you actually have to demo them for yourself.

    sealed cabinets have no "holes" for air to escape or enter (hence the name "sealed")
    they arent typically as efficient (as loud as) ventedor ported cabinets but can usually handle more wattage. The speaker in such a cabinet is usually more controlled by the amp
    Vented and ported cabinets have a "hole" of sorts that allows air to escape and enter. These cabinets are typically "tuned" to a particular low end frequency which generally reflects the lowest frequency that they can effectively reproduce. These cabinets are generally more efficent (louder) than the sealed variety, but cannot handle as many watts.
    Insulation inside a cabinet is generally used to "soak up" frequncies (typically high mids) to prevent an excess of these frequencies.
     
  3. basstark

    basstark

    Jun 6, 2004
    cool stuff. how are different woods of different cabs altering the tone? i picked up an old sunn 2 15 and as i recall the 15s within the cabinet are sectioned with plywood. what would the purpose of that be? can a horn or folded horn be added to any cab (assuming there is space)? any direction and thought that you, the talkbasser reading this thread, could write to help me learn and identify features of cabs would be peaches with me. To the message board! :hyper:
     
  4. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    the only cabs i can think of that are made with different woods are bag end. the carpeted series is (i belive) poplar plywood, and the birch series are birch (duh) plywood. the difference is very subtle, the birch seem a little brighter. Overall, a cab made with good void free plywood is sturdy and good sounding (as long as everything else is in order). Sectioning with plywood internally reduces the interaction between the drivers and can also be used as bracing to add stiffness and prevent resonance.
    A folded horn has to be incorporated in the original design of the cab as it is being built. The internal structure of cabinets is generally determined by the charactaristics of the specific drivers being incorporated into it and their thiele-small parameters (google that) :p . For the most part cabinets today incorporate CAD (computer aided design).