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I have a Florea Recital II bass. Is it worth upgrading or should I buy a new one?

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by stephen3547, Sep 26, 2013.


  1. Most of the hardware (tuners, bridge, tailpiece) needs replacement. And it will need new strings and a new bow. I bought it from my friend used and she didn't take very good care of it. Should I go through with these upgrades or buy a new bass?
    I am taking classical lessons with my local university's professor if that makes a difference.
     
  2. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg Supporting Member

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    Ask your professor what he/she thinks about the bass. Tuners and endpin can be pricey unless you can find direct fit replacements. Bridge $3-400. Strings and bow are not relevant to your decision. Are you ready for a better bass? If so, sell this as is and get one.
     
  3. drurb

    drurb Oracle, Ancient Order of Rass Hattur; Mem. #1, EPC

    Apr 17, 2004
    I suggest that you be happy with whatever you've gotten from the Florea and start over. IMO, it's not worth spending good money to have work done on this instrument. It's likely to need more and more work and it's unlikely that you'd get a decent return if and when you want to upgrade. In fact, it might literally fall apart before then. My advice is to put your available dollars into a decent entry-level (or better) bass. This is especially true if you will be playing arco, which is certainly not to say that it doesn't matter for pizz. :)
     

  4. They have tuners on gollihur music for ~$100 a a set and a bridge for the same price. If I pay that much for some will they be cruddy or are they just a good deal?
     
  5. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg Supporting Member

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    I don't know, but labor to install is what costs the most.
     

  6. This is what I was thinking. It's already got cracks on the edges. Should I avoid electrics? There's a few (Stagg, NS, and Eminence) at local music stores and, as far as I can tell, they have a nice tone and feel that isn't vastly different from the tones I'm hearing from acoustics.
     

  7. Am I not capable of doing it myself? I've looked into it and it doesn't seem like a vast challenge. I feel confident I could do it decently myself
     
  8. drurb

    drurb Oracle, Ancient Order of Rass Hattur; Mem. #1, EPC

    Apr 17, 2004
    Who will install the tuners? Are you planning to do that yourself? Do you know that they will fit? A bridge has to be fitted to the instrument and requires a fair amount of skill and expertise. Eric's estimate of $300-400 for the job is quite accurate. Unless you have the necessary skills, then the cost of having a luthier fit a new bridge, install decent tuners, and replace the tailpiece will exceed substantially the value of the bass as sold new! Keep in mind that you'll probably need to re-plane the fingerboard as well. Again, that's something that requires very specific skills.

    Now, if it's the case that your funds are very limited, then you gotta do what you gotta do. The approach you seem to be suggesting is, however, far from optimal in terms of results and in terms of efficient and wise use of $$$.

    Are you able to put together ~$1500 for a decent bass? If so, then you'll end up saving in the long run and being much happier.

    I'm not sure that you really appreciate what's involved in doing this properly. On the other hand, if you're already a highly-skilled woodworker, then I suppose you could do it with some instruction. You'd be putting this time and effort into an instrument that really isn't worthy of it. Again, if you simply have no other choice, that's a different matter. By the way, do you know how to reset the sound-post if/when it drops when you're fitting the bridge? Yup-- something else that requires expertise.

    IMO, you should buy a new bass.
     
  9. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg Supporting Member

    Jul 7, 2004
    Chicago
    What drurb wrote. Good luck!
     
  10. How do you know the new machines will fit precisely into the existing holes in the pegbox? Bushing the holes and making new ones isn't rocket science, but it's a pain in the ***. Same goes for fitting a bridge. Not to mention the fact that, as a new player, you don't really know what's right, or what you like!
     

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