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i learned about KINGWOOD in school today...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by frederic b. hodshon, Jan 30, 2002.


  1. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    very nice rosewood variant.

    never heard of before...VERY VERY PRICEY!!!

    nearly as much as nice ebony...

    a certain luthier (who shall go nameless for now) is building a bass completely out of kingwood.

    gorgeous pics so far!!!!

    YUM!

    maybe, just maybe...

    f
     
  2. alx564

    alx564

    Jul 31, 2000
    Emmaus, PA
    Hey, could you post some pictures of the bass so far, or maybe a link to that nameless luthiers website or something.
     
  3. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    well, that would kill the whole nameless game i'm playing now wouldn't it?

    i'm being selfish here...i'm hopin' to have first dibs on this beast.

    f
     
  4. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Hey, Fred,
    what about that project of your own, then?
     
  5. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    ouch...

    still on the bench...

    <sniff - you remembered.>

    f
     
  6. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Being "completely" made of any wood would scare me off, Fred. Maybe you know something I don't.

    But as good as the stuff is, the instrument would theoretically have the same resonant frequency and same modulus of energy throughout. In effect, that should add up to "tone dead."

    I think luthiers, acoustic and electric, always use woods with a variety of tonal characteristics in one instrument for a very good reason.
     
  7. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    You think the same way about your pre-CBS P-bass?
     
  8. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    hmmm...

    interesting points...and beyond my scope of knowledge.

    let's just say, the pics make it look like its completely out of a single log...

    attractive, no? hehe :D

    believe me, though, this luthier knows what he's doing.

    it is i who doesn't know what the heck i'm talking about.

    i'll get more info and post soon.

    fred
     
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think that Michael Tobias has said this before - that you need a mixture of woods.

    Early Fenders were of course, "happy accidents" - but even these would all have had different woods in the body from those in the neck.

    As to the original post - my view would be then - why not go with Ebony? I had a Yamaha TRB6P which had an Ebony fingerboard and wasn't too pricey!
     
  10. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Yes, it just reinforces my suspicion of a single-wodod bass as a tone killer, as Bruce finds..... although it would be cool if this one-wood bass could change the history of luthiery technology. I don't think de Torres and Martin were using different woods in a single instrument in the 1850's just because they looked pretty together .

    My old Precis has a maple neck and an alder body - 2 different woods with different resonant freq's. I think the paint makes the body behave a bit more like the maple, even though the years have "warmed it", tonally by breaking up the paint.

    YET, the neck is a single wood and has the "beloved" dead spots that plague a single-wood Precison neck because the one-wood neck has some resonant freq's that match a couple of fretted notes.
     
  11. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    ooops...didn't mean to start an argument about single wood basses.

    i may not even be correct with my assumption.

    more later.

    f
     
  12. My Brubaker is all maple (one of them, anyway) and it has lots of tone. I dunno--maybe the maple's different density or something--it's real heavy but it works fine tonally.
     
  13. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Yeah, my Pedulla Rapture is all maple, and it sounds great to me. Of course, the neck is flatsawn hardrock maple, the fingerboard is birdseye maple, and the body is soft maple, so maybe the differences in wood density gives the neck and body different resonant frequencies.
     
  14. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    I thought we only were talking about one single BODY wood and wondered what the heck the big deal was. Well, duh, I'm stupid. 1 + 1 = 2. :oops:
     
  15. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I don't doubt it sounds good, funky.

    What I was saying about a bass made completely of a single wood is a principle in the luthiery world. However, as you may have seen on the internet, state something that is true almost all the time and you're sure to hear from those who are the exceptions.

    But for me - I prefer to go with the odds-on favorite in these cases.

    Multi-wood, laminated necks are the preferred way to go in bass luthiery. Yet there are people like Rick Turner who choose their wood carefully, know volumes about luthiery, and seem to do just fine with single wood necks. My Lakland Skyline has a single-wood neck but I trust the builder. I don't know who is building Fred's, so, I'm cautious.

    Then there are those single-wood necks made by those who don't know what they're doing or don't care -

    [​IMG]
     
  16. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    I WILL say this about that...

    the neck to this MYSTERY bass is laminated. a VERY unique lamination technique to boot.

    SOOOO, my initial comments were misleading...i really didn't mean it was a MONOLITHIC bass...just meant that it looked like the same TYPE of wood was used throughout the bass.

    i know for a fact that even the body is made up of several pieces.

    sorry for the confusion...i have an e-mail out to the luthier regarding the wood specifics.

    i might even reveal the luthier and send pics to those who can ID the song MYSTERY ROACH...the composer, the LP, the movie, the 2 lead singers, the year, and what format the movie was originally shot in.

    whoo hoo...isn't this fun?

    fred
     
  17. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Let's just say he was from Baltimore.

    Show me the pics

    ;)
     
  18. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    good call mr B!!!

    BUT, you already know who the mystery luthier is...so keep it to your lowend self....deal?

    :D

    i'll send pics if i can find yer e-mail.

    i'm STILL waiting to find out the price on this baby.

    f
     
  19. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    I do? Hmmm..

    [thinking]

    [not remembering]

    [grrr....]

    [getting angry with fred]


    [checking Priceline.com for West Coast airfares]


    [borrowing collapsible plastic shotgun from neighbor]


    [picking up camoflauged sweatsuit from the cleaners]




    maybe you should just send the pic...


    m'kay?:D
     
  20. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Oh! That's a new ball game! Sounds intriguing (Schmill?)

    As for the contest -one of my all time fave movies, Zappa's "200 Motels" (saw it 14 times and have the album).

    Were the singers Howard Volman and Mark Kaylan a.k.a., Flo & Eddie (saw them live; really rank!)

    Poisunally, I dug Jimmy Carl Black doing "Lonesome Cowboy Burt" -

    "So come on in this place
    And I'll buy you a taste,
    And you can sit on my face,
    Where's my waitress?

    OPAL! Yew hawt lil biyutch!"