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I`m New And Starting To Get Blue

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by davegr8house, Aug 13, 2001.


  1. HELLO ALL,
    I AM NEW TO THE URB AND FIRST WANT TO THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME IF YOU CAN HELP. I HAVE BEEN PLAYING ELECTRIC BASS FOR 14 YEARS AND URB ABOUT A YEAR. WELL I HAVE NOTICED THE FINGERBOARD IS COMING APART FROM THE NECK.ITS NOT LOOSE AND IT DOES NOT SEEM TO AFFECT THE SOUND. IT IS CHIPING AT THE SEAM WHERE IT IS GLUED. IS THIS A COMMON PROBLEM? IS IT COSTLY TO FIX"gulp"? HELP......
     
  2. Hey welcome to TB, I really can't answer your questions but I can help a little.

    First I see your a Ray Brown fan, I try to see him every time he is in Boston, I love his playing.

    You probally shouldn't write in all CAPS.
    The next thing is can you give any more info about the bass? I.e Make, model, fingerboard type.

    You shall get your answers soon enough. Any more info you can give will help those that can answer the question.
     
  3. sorry about the large caps
     
  4. The bass is Chinese made. Rosewood fingerboard. Other than the neck it is built like a tank. I bought it on ebay.They come from Houston, TX. I don`t know the maker. They said it was 4/4.
     
  5. DrGroove

    DrGroove

    Jun 8, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Same thing happened to my upright about a year after it's purchase.

    The fingerboard began separating. I brought it to a shop to have it fixed, which cost $50.

    Basically, luthiers use a process called 'tacking' when they are building an upright bass.

    The fingerboard is attached to the neck with 3 to 4 little spots of wood glue. In this way, they are able to shape the neck and fingerboard to match one another, while retaining the flexibility of removing the fingerboard to work on each piece separately.

    Depending on how they're building the bass, the neck and fingerboard may be worked on before or after the neck has been attached to the body. "tacking" the fingerboard has advantages in either method, and from my understanding is widely employed by luthiers.

    However, two things can happen when the fingerboard has been 'tacked':

    1. If the luthier works in a larger manufacturing-type environment, with a high-paced production schedule, the fingerboard may never be correctly glued to the neck, in order to meet production or to save on cost to build.

    2. The luthier may just plain forget to finish gluing the sucker on.

    In either case, it should be a relatively inexpensive process to have a local upright (or even violin or guitar) luthier remove the fingerboard & re-glue it to the neck using the complete attachment method (not just 'tacking' it back on).

    Please don't let this discourage you from playing! I'm sure your bass will play & sound 100% better once this relatively minor condition has been addressed.


    Good luck! ;)
     
  6. Thanks doc. I was pretty bumed. I contacted Nashville Violins yesterday to see about a set-up and the fringerboard. They told me that it may be the black coating they put on the fingerboard when they built it. If not I had a problem but could be fixed. Your reply tells me alot.......mostly that I don`t need to go get a loan. YEEHAA...."woops, southern thang". I am mostly an electric bass player"6-string". Got a feeling computers all over the world just got the bird........Anyway, I have become addicted to the double bass. Its all I practice now and I`m always looking for advice"i know,get a teacher". Thanks again Doc.

    P.S. I just put on a set of corrilli 370`s med. and my bass sounds wonderful. Lets see.....how do they say....."ALL HAIL BOB".






    ......If the world didn`t suck, we would all fall off....
     
  7. DrGroove

    DrGroove

    Jun 8, 2000
    Austin, TX
    don't thank me just yet... take it to the luthier & make sure it's simple... (hopefully it is). If not, be sure to always get a 2nd opinion before you blow wads of your hard - earned - cash on repairs, a lot of less reputable luthiers & repair shops will try to screw you on repair costs. but, for all intents and purposes the repair should cost way less than $100, probably very similar to the $50 I blew.

    If not, and you're willing to drive north, I can recommend a place in Chicago & the head bass repair guy that actually worked on my price & hooked me up w/ the 'college' pricing of $50.

    Hey, good luck, and keep playing!
     
  8. I have been meaning to post an update to this and keep forgeting. I took the bass to Nashville Violins to have the repair to the neck and set-up done to her. Well, Dave the luither and now my teacher was great. He reglued the fingerboard, installed bridge adjusters, did complete set-up and has the bass sounding much louder and with way more punch. Its not the same bass. All this for 150 bucks! He did not haft to replace the bridge or anything. the bridge that come on it was fine, it just needed to be planed down. The soundpost needed adj....yada yada yada. He could not tell the maker of the bass. He said it was chinese but did not know. He did say it was surprisingly in good shape. I guess not all chinese bass are complete crap. He also told me it measured out to be a 7/8 bass. All well, just thought I would finish what I started. Have a good day.
    Dave
    --------------------------------------------------
    If the world didn`t suck we would all fall off;)
     
  9. So what color are you now?
     
  10. As white as ever........:p