I need a bass for my (young) kid

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by unity bass, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. unity bass

    unity bass

    Dec 15, 2003
    Modesto, Ca.
    Who here has got their kid(s) into the bass, how old were they, and what bass did you start them on.

    I'm thinking of getting an electric bass for my 4 year old daughter to "play" on. :bassist: She's had a 1/4 scale acoustic since she was 2 and she picks it up about twice a month for about 4 minutes each time. :rolleyes: (It's been within my second daughters reach since her birth). It's dang cute when they play it and my four year old has become a pretty good improvisational singer.

    Anyway, I just figured she'd spend more time on it if it was loud (and) like daddy's. Any suggestions? (Thanks, I've already ruled out Daisey Rock and custom 1/4 scale boutique basses). :D

    Thanks for any suggestions on where to shop as well.
    I see a B.A. STAR bass on ebay right now and I may go with one but there must be other options!

  2. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    It's a bit too big for her, but I really like the Squier Musicmaster. It is cheap but it has a Fender sound of sorts.
  3. Funkize you

    Funkize you Guest

    Nov 4, 2003
    Westminster Ca.
    I bet Bill Conklin could build you a sweet 9 string 14" Bass...

    err... Wait.
  4. I've got a homemade, guitar-scale fretless, totally bizarre little thing, but it actually sounds kinda neat. I got it for free when I bought a few other items from an estate sale. I don't use it enough to justify having it taking up room, so I'll give it to you if you'd be willing to pay for shipping from Los Angeles. If you wanna talk, shoot me an e-mail: joshsolbergATyahooDOTcom.
  5. BartmanPDX

    BartmanPDX Supporting Member

    Dude, that's a super-cute story. :) My 4-year-old girl likes to bang on daddy's Steinberger (I'm grateful that it's a one-piece carbon fiber model :D ). I've dreamed of getting her to play some and I'd love to get her a bass of her own, but she has autism and is fairly rough on her toys (and her people! :p ). Also, I can't really communicate with her due to the autism -- she's in her own world and we can't hold any kind of conversation beyond one or two words. :( Hopefully she'll grow out of it somewhat if we can reduce her epilepsy meds.

    Good luck and enjoy teaching your little student! I'll be following this thread for ideas on what bass I can buy my little one if she ever starts wanting to play.
  6. kjones

    kjones Supporting Member

    Dec 4, 2004
    A year ago, my then-five year old son started playing a Squier Bronco. It certainly holds up to what he does to it, and I actually get a few laughs playing it myself from time to time. The size is fine, although I was really amused when he told me the roundwounds were too hard on his fingers, so he wanted flatwounds like those on my Glaub. All in all, seems like a good choice.
  7. unity bass

    unity bass

    Dec 15, 2003
    Modesto, Ca.
    This is what makes the TB forum great! I hope everyone sees this thread and learns something about the amazing community we have here. Thank you so much for this generous offer and your interest in my daughters development. Let me think about the idea of fretless before I take you up on it.

    Thanks for restoring my faith in humanity!
  8. Bassmanbob

    Bassmanbob Supporting Member

    I don't want to burst your bubble, but you may want to wait at least three years before you buy her an instrument. If you want her to learn how to play it properly, most kids don't have the finger dexterity and attention span to keep up with it. I've seen this lead to frustration and an eventual disinterest in playing any instrument in my limited experience.

    If you don't mind her playing it five minutes every three months and then tell you she wants to play the flute when she gets serious in the fifth grade, then get her a bass. Most music teachers will agree that most kids aren't ready to learn to play a musical instrument until they are 10, maybe the very earliest 8.

    I told my kid she couldn't take piano lessons until she was 8 years old, but we've always had one of those cheap keyboards around the house. She fiddles with it about once every two or three months for a half hour. On her 8th birthday, I woke her for school and wished her a happy birthday. The first thing she said was, "Daddy, can I take piano lessons now?" So now I am looking for a full size keyboard and a piano teacher. How could I say no.

    Whatever you decide, good for you and your interest in expanding your childs artistic mind! I wish more parents were like you.
  9. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Those P bass Juniors are very cool! It's a shame that they cost so much. I would like to have one just for the fun of it. And maybe I could make one of my kids into a bass player.
  10. kjones

    kjones Supporting Member

    Dec 4, 2004
    Bassmanbob has raised a really good point. I agree that 5 and 6 year olds (typically) aren't mature enough to handle the discipline of serious scale playing or work with a metronome. I encourage/make him play 3 times a week, but he can direct what he plays, whether he plays along with songs or just practices getting a good tone on strings up and down the neck while we name the note is totally up to him. Letting him self-direct to this extent means that he has a lot of control and doesn't feel constricted. YMMV.
  11. Heck, I'm 29, and I just developed the maturity for serious scale playing and work with a metronome about 3 weeks ago...
  12. karrot-x

    karrot-x Banned

    Feb 21, 2004
    Omicron Persei 8

    That is a beautiful post.
  13. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    +1!!!! What's up with that, anyway??? I saw it on the rack, grabbed it ("this is too cool, what a great novelty"), about dropped it when I saw the price tag, and couldn't put it back fast enough.