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i need a nut!

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by RETSAMPALS, Nov 18, 2000.


  1. RETSAMPALS

    RETSAMPALS

    Sep 10, 2000
    does anybody know where i can just get a replacement nut online???
    jeezz it's like so common and nobody seems to sell them!
     
  2. I should also add that you need the catalogue for the correct part #. You can get that free from the link above.
     
  3. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    I'm pretty sure that Stew- Mac has a $25.00 minimum order.

    Pkr2
     
  4. You're right about the $25 minimum order. I forgot about that. Every time I place an order it comes to about $25.00 more than I really want to spend :)
     
  5. RETSAMPALS

    RETSAMPALS

    Sep 10, 2000
    ahhh...that sux....
    oh....i think carvin sells em...so thanks a lot everyone
     
  6. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    RETSAMPALS,

    Unless you have a Carvin bass(no profile), the replacement nut is unlikely to fit.

    Why are you replacing the nut? unless its broken there are ways to fill, shim and adjust the original nut without having to replace it.

    making your own isn't really that hard. Making a new nut is a good exercize in basic repairs that you can do yourself. It's one of the few jobs that you can totally screw up with nothing lost but a little time. If you mess up, simply throw it away and start over again.

    If you are still in school(no profile), and your school has a woodworking class, check with the class instructor and see if someone in the class would make you one as a class project.

    If you know a wood carver, its only about a 30 minute job to duplicate the original with only a pocket knife and sandpaper.

    By using various materials, you can even even change the sound of your bass, within limits.A good source for material is the black keys from a junked piano. They are usually ebony which makes a good nut and most piano shops will give you a couple if you ask.

    Go for it. What do you have to lose?

    Pkr2

    P.S., please fill out your profile. We all would like to know you better. :) :)
     
  7. RETSAMPALS

    RETSAMPALS

    Sep 10, 2000
    ummm...well i think i sorta lost the nut
    and i don't think we have a woodworking shop in this school
    yeah i'll go fill out my profile now...
     
  8. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Retsampal, tnx for doing the profile thing.

    What kind (brand) of bass do you own? A direct factory nut replacement would be the fastest and easiest way to get your bass up and running.

    If you are reasonably handy with tools(pocket knife, sandpaper and a file), you can still do it yourself. I would be more than happy to fly you through it via E-mail.

    Given the brand and model of the bass, there may be a member who has a parts bass that has a usable nut that will work. As small as a nut is, it could be delivered by mail.

    You may, as lots of us have discovered, find that doing as much of your own set up and repair work as possible, to be just as satisfying as the playing of the instrument.

    Good luck, Pkr2
     
  9. Hey pkr2, I'd actually be interested in hearing about how I could do this. I have a graphite nut on a fender 5 string fretless, and the nut is cut too low. It's almost level with the fingerboard, resulting in some nasty buzzing at the low end of the neck. Is there a way I can remove the nut without damaging it and raise it a bit? Thanks! :)
     
  10. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    S.R.5:

    Unless the nut has been reglued, it should come off pretty easily. It wouldn't hurt anything to warm the nut up to soften any adhesive that may be holding it. Just start at one end of the nut and GENTLY pry the nut up at one end. When the nut moves it should come out pretty easily.

    In order not to lose the advantage of the graphite nut, put the shim under the nut as opposed to filling and recutting the notches. Buy a cheap feeler guage that has brass leaves and is made like a pocket knife. Cut the proper thickness blade and trim it to the same size as the footprint of the nut using heavy kitchen shears. Glue the shim to the neck with wood glue. This will raise the nut while maintaining the original profile. Elmers yellow wood glue is what I use. Whatever you do, don't use epoxy.
    I don't remember who posted the suggestion about using aluminum from a beer can to make a V shaped shim in the notch to raise the string. You would lose the graphite advantage but that would be quick, dirty and effective. I haven't tried this method myself but I see no reason for it not to work.

    Hope I haven't confused you more than I helped you.

    Pkr2




     
  11. Not at all. You've helped me just fine! Thank you! Only questions that remains are, what would be the best way to warm up the nut? And, just to make sure I understand correctly, I take a brass shim cut from a feeler gauge, glue it to the nut, and then glue the nut + shim back into the nut slot, all using elmers yellow wood glue?
     
  12. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    That's pretty much it S.R. Try ,first, to remove the nut w/o warming it. If it is stubborn, use a hairdryer.

    Use both heat and glue as sparingly as possible. The glue serves more to keep the nut in place than to serve as a structural fastener.Once it's tuned up, the string pressure will keep everything in place. A very small dab(about 1/2 the size of of a B-B) will keep everything in place. You don't want glue to squish out into the nut slot. Too much is worse than too little.

    Just as an after thought. Make sure the nut slot is clean, smooth and flat before putting everything together. If the edges of the brass develop a bit of wavyness on the edges,
    make sure you burnish the edges flat before assembly.


    Pkr2
     
  13. A hair dryer! Great idea.

    I'm glad you mentioned not to overdo it with the glue. I was one of those kids in kindergarten with more paste than construction paper on all my arts & crafts! :D I'll use it sparingly.

    Thanks so much! :)
     
  14. RETSAMPALS

    RETSAMPALS

    Sep 10, 2000
    well i've just found another one of my basses, actually lost it for three months.....it's a jazz style. yeah well believe it or not the nut is broken on that thing too. i fixed it by putting a toothpick under the E-string where the nut is borken but i need to get a new one for it. My other bass needs a whole new nut cuz i lost the nut hehe

    well....they are both no-name basses becuase i'm so damn poor....
    if you've ever heard of the name "photogenic" and i doubt any of you have, that's one of the basses
    the other one is an RJ....i think it's a filipino company cuz i've seen some of their basses in the philipines....I don't know where mine came from becuase it is an old school bass that i have taken over....
     
  15. There is a wonderful nut on the market called Graphtek, which is actually a solid lubricant! I've just put one on my custom six string, and it is heaps better than plastic or bone.
     
  16. Borderline

    Borderline

    Oct 30, 2000
    Do you know where I could find information on those? I've actually heard about them a few times, and am very curious....
     
  17. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    What is the biggest difference between the Graphtek and the original bridge, Marty? I've never actually A-B'd the two. I undestand that it makes a bass easier to tune but does it make much differnce in the tone?

    I'm pretty sure that if I were fitting a new bridge anyway that I'd give it a try.

    Pkr2
     
  18. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Ret, why don't you check the nut that you have,in the bass missing the nut? If they're the same you have a pattern to make a new nut by.

    If you can get the broken nut out of the slot without destroying it, it can be repaired.

    Get a piece of .008 brass shim stock and cut out a piece that corresponds to the footprint of the nut. Coat the bottom of the nut with epoxy. Coat the broken ends of the nut with a good heavy dab that will squish out when the ends are put together. Place the pieces of bridge down on the shim stock. The blade of a regular table knife makes a good surface to glue everything up on by using rubber bands, clothespins or whatever to hold things in place till the epoxy hardens. Now you can clean the squish out from the slots with the edge of a piece of sand paper folded to a sharp crease. The same sandpaper can be used to clean up anything that comes out a little rough.

    If the .008" noticeably raises the strings at the nut, thats a good thing. Now you have new material in which to file (sandpaper) new slots into.

    One point. Use wax paper to keep your work from gluing itself to the knife blade.
    Believe me, it sounds more complicated than it really is. :)

    good luck, Pkr2
     
  19. oh sorry i thought this was a thread about tom green