I NEED everyones Opinion:

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by HWK2, Sep 21, 2000.

  1. Alright, what I have in my hands as I write this thread is a MIC (China) Affinity P-Bass, that I have just stripped all the finish off, and I found that the wood is actually quite nice underneath. My question for all of you is this. I want to paint it (or just stain it) a color that will leave the grain atleast somewhat showing through. Now, I've thought about trying to get a sunburst finish out of it, but I don't know how hard that is going to be, or how much it would cost to have a local shop try it (if anyone knows of any guitar shops that would do it for me here in Portland Oregon, or near by, I'd love to hear from you!) So, what are your oppinions? I have a Rosewood fretboard on my neck (I may be able to get my hands on a maple fretboard neck though) and a white pickguard. So, What color should I make my newly stripped bass, and what wood for the fretboard should I get (Based on looks alone. I have read all of the posts about Maple -vs- Rosewood, and either is fine for me). Need input, and you are all smart ladies and gents.. so lets hear it!!

    :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
    William Katz
  2. pierce

    pierce freethinker

    May 25, 2000
    San Francisco, Ca
  3. RAM


    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Sunburst? That's a major undertaking! Many of today's instruments have as many as 9 different coats of paint, and also have clear coat inserted between each coat of paint! Sunburst is especially tough because, although painting is usually done with an airbrush anyway, sunburst requires extra effort to have the colors "blend" outward.

    That being said, you can do it if you have the time and patience. After sealing the bass with some kind of a grain filler, you paint the bass the solid color that you want it to blend from. Then, with each successive coat of paint, work your way toward the edges, getting narrower as you move outward.

    I'd recommend, if the wood is that nice, that you just use an oil finish. I've seen professionals have to scrap paint jobs and start over because the finished product didn't come out right.
  4. Pat Wilkins of Wilkins Guitars did an awesome refinish with tigers eye on my PRS "10" quilt top which was originally purple! He also did a superb custom psychedelic finish on another instrument. Pat does a lot of work for and is consulted by major players like Schecter, Tom Anderson, Sadowsky, PRS, etc. He is located in Van Nuys, CA. Many him consider him to be the best at finishing and refinishing guitars.


    Tell him that Jim Sloves recommended him.

    (I have no business affiliation with Pat at all.)
  5. CS


    Dec 11, 1999
    IMHO white blonde but I dont know how difficult or expensive it is to do, leave the neck rosewood and get a torty pickguard.

    Well you did ask. Whatever you do have fun.
  6. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU

    Probably wax would be your best option if you want to do it yourself, dunno about the sunburst tho.

    Small jar enough to finish couple of guitars costs about 10-15 bucks, they come in basic colors so if you want something more special you might want to consider mixing two different colors, red and blue for purple for example. Using clear wax as first layer is recommended tho that adds bit to the cost, but then again you can mix red, blue and clear wax to make it a seethru color.

  7. apollo bassist

    apollo bassist

    Sep 23, 2000
    Instead of a guitar shop why not try an auto body shop that does custom paint jobs? My custom made 5-string was airbrushed by a friend and it was taken to an auto body shop where they applied a clear acrylic to protect it. Can't even leave fingerprints on it! Anyway, you might want to check into auto places 'cause it might be cheaper than a guitar shop. It was cheaper in my case.
  8. VicDamone


    Jun 25, 2000
    If you want a sunburst go with the professional suggestion above.
    If your on the cheep you might concider a product called Lighten Up. This stuff sort of bleaches the bare wood to a very light color. You could then seal it with a satin poly urathane. It ends up looking like theres no finish on the wood.
  9. I'm not an expert on finishes but have heard arguments that the thinner the finish the less restrictive it will be on the acoustic resonance of your instrument's body. Certain materials may also attenuate the resonance to a greater or less degree. Good luck.