Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

I SAVED A BIRD TOO!

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Mike Money, Jul 7, 2005.


  1. Mike Money

    Mike Money Banned

    Mar 18, 2003
    Bakersfield California
    Avatar Speakers Endorsing Hooligan
    I found it while I was on a walk with a lady friend... We tried to take it to a animal hospital, but they wouldn't take it...

    It does not appear to be injured in anyway, just fell out of a tree.

    I'm gonna take it to the local Cal State U on monday cause they have a bird sanctuary.

    Its just so darned cute. Its uh baybee.
     
  2. Thought I read somewhere that the mother bird will abandon it once it smells like humans. That they'll put it back in the nest if left alone. Could be an old wive's tale, I wouldn't swear to it...

    Randy
     
  3. Sonorous

    Sonorous

    Oct 1, 2003
    Denton, TX
    Yeah, you were just trying to be sensitive in front of your lady friend.
     
  4. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    It is an old wives tale.
     
  5. Mike Money

    Mike Money Banned

    Mar 18, 2003
    Bakersfield California
    Avatar Speakers Endorsing Hooligan
    We took it to a place that everyone said takes them in and then takes them out to the wild life shelter... but this place didn't do that after all.

    So I consulted google, and google said I should take it back to where i found it...

    I found it in a school parking lot a long a fence, and on the other side there was a tree with chirping birds and such, so I just took it to the house. They were like "say what?" then their little daughter came up and was like "aaaaaww" so they went along with it.
     
  6. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Then as soon as the door closed...she ate it.

    brad cook
     
  7. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    Don't stick it's head in a vaccum
     
  8. Bruce B

    Bruce B

    Sep 2, 2004
    USA
    I know you were trying to help, but it's generally a good idea to not "rescue" baby birds on the ground unless they are in some immediate danger. The parents are usually watching them and they will fly soon if they don't get eaten first. Many don't make it but that's how it works.
     
  9. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    On behalf of NTB Bird Lovers International I'm going to have to disagree with you on that one. Vacuuming a bird's head is perhaps one of the most effective ways to show your love and concern for our avian friends. Right after pegging them with airsoft guns.

    brad cook
     
  10. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Actually we had a nest of swallows on our front porch. One day I came home and two babies were lying on the ground on their backs. Still alive but not doing anything. I put on some surgical gloves and put them back in the nest. Apparently one lived and another fell back out and died.

    brad cook
     
  11. Passinwind

    Passinwind I Know Nothing Supporting Member

    Very few birds have a well developed sense of smell, but some other species, like deer for instance, will abandon babies after human contact. In many cases, the birds you find were evicted by the parents or a sibling, and may well be thrown out again if you replace them in the nest. Especially if it's the wrong nest. :eyebrow: It's not uncommon for birds to fledge before they can really fly too.

    Rehabilitating injured or orphaned birds is a tricky deal. It's illegal for a layman to do in the US too, for what that's worth. Anybody contemplating doing it might want to take a look at the rec.birds FAQ on USENET, which you can Google. There are some tips there on how to keep the bird alive until you can get it to a licensed rehabilitator. A friend of mine is learning the craft right now, it's pretty interesting.

    Mike, I think you did about the best you could, really. It's tough to just let 'em sit there, but usually that's the best move.
     
  12. Max

    Max Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2000
    Bakersfield, CA
    My kids rescued a whole nest that fell out of this nook up high on our second story eave. Two died within a day or two probably from injuries sustained in the fall. The cat got one about a week later. The runt, who they named "Simon Burch" survived. He was bald and downy and over a period of about six weeks, they fed him Gerber rice cereal out of an eye dropper. When he feathered and started doing those test flapping exercises in his shoebox they took him outside and he flew up into a tree. Later in the day, my wife went outside to check on him. He flew out of the tree, to the porch, took a last shot of rice cereal out of the eye dropper and then flew high into the sky never to be seen again. A great story we still talk about now years later.

    It was also a big smelly hassle. Next time, I'd just stomp on em and get it over with.
     
  13. RicPlaya

    RicPlaya

    Apr 22, 2003
    Whitmoretucky MI
    About 10 years ago I was on my way into the office building I worked in and saw a little shinny bright green humming bird on the ground. I picked it up and put it in my car in a box. I checked on it at during the work day and took it home after work. It was in the fall when I found it so I figured maybe it's food sources were not as available (it starts to cool down in Michigan around late August) so I pondered how to feed this little thing. I went to the local store and purchased some gatorade. If it works to rehydrate athletes it might work for humming birds. I put a little in a spoon and held the humming bird on my finger and put it's little beak toward the gatorade. To my amazement this little tounge came out and the humming bird sucked down the gatorade through it's little straw like tounge. I fed the bird for about an hour like this. Soon it started to fly around my room, buzzing around. I caught it and fed it some more then took it on the porch. It sat on my finger for about 20 seconds then flew staright up in the air like a little missle. Moral of the story, gatorade works to rehab humming birds. It was a very cool expieriance being so close and maybe saving such a cool seldom seem animal, at least in my area of the world.
     
  14. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    I spell Vacuum like a pervert.
     
  15. Passinwind

    Passinwind I Know Nothing Supporting Member

    Ric,

    Being In Michigan it was probably a Rubythroated hummer. Late migrators can benefit from human help sometimes, and that's a cool story for sure. Straight 4:1 sugar solution works great, BTW. I'll bet he hit a window and was stunned, or something along those lines.

    When I first moved out here, I was shocked to see an Anna's hummingbird hanging around in the winter, apparently looking for the feeders we'd taken down in the late fall. We put a feeder back out, kept it thawed on the sporadic freezing days we get here, and it survived the winter just fine. We started to talk to oldtimers, who said they'd been winter feeding for years here. Anna's hummers are non-migratory, and eat a lot of bugs compared to other hummingbirds. I live in a mill town, and I think the steam and lumber contributes to a good food resource. There are lots of these little guys around here in the winter.

    A couple of years ago we a had a much bigger snow year than usual. Check it out:
    [​IMG]

    These guys have a wild "song" too, it'd do Ornette Coleman proud. :cool:
     
  16. RicPlaya

    RicPlaya

    Apr 22, 2003
    Whitmoretucky MI
    Wow, humming birds in winter! I thought they all migrated. Learn something new every day on TB.