Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

I stepped up But Im not sure if I need a new bridge.

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Iruleonbass, Jun 18, 2005.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Iruleonbass

    Iruleonbass

    May 29, 2005
    New York
    Long title. Anyways I finally stepped up and bought a jazz bass, I read on reviews that the bridge is pretty crappy on the standards. And everyone recomended the bassass II. Do you guys think this is a good idea or bad idea? In other words, a worthwhile investment, becuase for the most part upgrades are always good. :meh:

    Im also going to be buying a new pickguard. How do I go about installing it? Im a real noob when it it comes to taking things apart, just like in general, not even talking about guitars or bass's.

    So yeah any other upgrades that I should get while im getting this work done would be nice to know.

    Thanks
    Sean
     
  2. gapupten

    gapupten

    Dec 29, 2004
    I have added a Badass to a jazz bass. Nice quality bridge. I did not think that it added much except weight, so I took it off and sold it. Others have found improvements in sustain and it is surely a better quality bridge than the original. Just not worth it to me.
    As for the pickguard, you just unscrew the little screws and lift the pickguard over the pickups and slide it out. Slide the new one in and screw it down. It's that simple.... If you get a pick guard that matches exactly. Not all do. I had no problem with a MIM Fender Jazz and a real Fender Pickguard.
    Good luck.
     
  3. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY

    Are you having problems with the current bridge? Either tonally or stability wise?

    I'm all for changing stuff out, but if neither of these things is currently a problem, I'd spend the money where it would make the most difference...the easiest and most postive (tonal) upgrade you can make on any of the 'standard' fender stuff is new pickups.
     
  4. RubyJunction

    RubyJunction

    Apr 24, 2005
    Yah, Badass II Bridges are the bomb. I love mine. I own a MIM Jazz Bass. I would definitely (in my humble opinion) go to a shop to get it installed and calibrated.......it's really easy from what I understand to mess it up if you don't know what you're doing....

    My pickguard when I got it was kind of tricky........I had to use a file around the neck pickup because it wouldn't seat correctly. BUT that's just me. It's really pretty easy to put on,
    just like gapupten said.

    Good luck with the upgrades! ;)
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Don't ever change out a part just because other people say you should do it. I use the stock bridge on my Fender Jazz and it works great. There's no change in sound...it's all voodoo and marketing babble IMO.
     
  6. It isn't all marketing and voodoo babble. Discerning ears can hear differences when there are differences to hear. That's the simple fact of the matter. However, I do agree that you should never change a part just because others say you should.

    Certain instruments can benefit from having parts changed out. On Fender American instruments, everything is high quality and works like it should except for the oft predictable "dead spot" around the B-D frets on the G string. Occasionally, a piece of body wood might be dull and be helped with a new bridge to help with sustain. And then there's the player that likes the instrument's feel but changes out the stock parts to alter the basic tone of the instrument. Nothing wrong with that either and it's not voodoo to make it happen. It's all in getting the right tool for your job
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I'll have to respectfully agree to disagree with you on that, Hambone. I have yet to hear a change in tone between bridges when I switch them out. I have a bass that's had 4 different bridges, and every time I switched it sounded identical. So you all can take it with a grain of salt if you wish, but that's my experience.
     
  8. Iruleonbass

    Iruleonbass

    May 29, 2005
    New York
    2 Dual-Coil Ceramic Noiseless Jazz Bass Pickups with Nickel Plated Pole Pieces Is what I've got. I got the Deluxe Active. I have yet to recieve the bass. But the person im buying it from said it was set up by a master. " {skip goetz: worked with clapton, b.b. king, albert lee to name just a few) "

    So Im doubtful I'll need the new bridge, nore will I want one if it sounds good. Im just trying to see what I should get if say I dont like it. And the pickguard, It turns out he has a vintage white with tort pickguard, (my personal fav) so I wont need to exchange pickguards. Only a set of Ernie Balls strings is what I'll need.

    Thanks
    Sean
     
  9. bannedwit

    bannedwit

    May 9, 2005
    Buffalo, NY
    I would get aftermarket pickups before getting a new bridge. I replaced mine with a Badass and I like the way it wounds now... Lot more sustain and it really makes the bass echo through the wood more due to its heavyness.
    It is like those big "paperclips" one can buy and put them on their headstock to give them better sustain. Only this is permanent... My setup for my P bass is the following...
    - P Bass MIM with the tobacco sunburst finish
    - Duncan Basslines Quarter Pound Pickups
    - Badass 2 Bridge
    - GraphTECH nut

    All these different mods require a truss rod and intonation adjustmetns and i had to file the saddles for the badass bridge to match the old configuration of the stock bridge...
     
  10. I don't exactly know what you are disagreeing with here Jim. Until you have the ears of every player in the world tacked on the side of your head, you can't speak for them or what they hear. Your statement is perfect, in that it speaks only of your experiences. My statement is perfect in that it leaves open the possibility of a tonal change "when there is one to hear".

    Did it occur to you that perhaps, just as you say, the bridge changes on your bass didn't make a change in the tone? How does your experience with that one instrument translate to mean that all basses will react the same way?

    I've been around these boards for a long time and you are going to have to get up quite a bit earlier to snare me into one of these inane arguments.
     
  11. go the route I did I made a pickguard out of 1/8 in dimond plate not the crap plastic ones they sell now, it is heavey as hell adds a killer deep tone to the body and sustains for days along with the bad ass II I put on their, but those pickups will go soon. But not really sure what to replace the with.
     
  12. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Not trying to get you into an argument, Hammy. I'm telling you my experiences. Notice I said IMO in my first post...that means "in my opinion." And yes, I don't believe that bridges change the sound. I've never heard a difference in any bass I've heard in a before/after situation. And if they do change it, it's almost never for the better. The big selling point for aftermarket bridges seems to be "increases sustain." I mean, how much sustain do people want or need? I always look for ways of decreasing sustain! The only reason I can see for wanting to change a bridge out is ease of changing strings. Fender bridges are a bit of a pain to change strings with.

    But I will stand wholly by my statement about "don't make changes on your bass just because other people think you should." It's foolish and a waste of money.
     
  13. I really love it when folks shout their opinions, then slam other's, then run and hide behind the "it's only MY opinion" rock when they get called on it.

    And my only point is that as you express your opinion, you leave no room for others to hold theirs. In fact, you make judgments about them:

    "I mean, how much sustain do people want or need?"

    Here, you've made a judgment about what a player needs in his instrument and what he wants his instrument to do. When one individual makes judgments about anothers needs that's where the logical line is crossed. You have absolutely no basis in fact to know what any or all other player's want or need in their instruments.

    And yes, aftermarket bridges have been marketed to increase sustain. Ever ask yourself why? Because back in the day when the first aftermarket bridge came out - the Quan BadAss I - it was designed to replace the terrible 3 point floating bridge on the Gibson EB-? type basses. If you've played one of these in it's original form, you know what lack of sustain is. The stock Gibson was a black hole of sustain and the Quan opened things up greatly. The sustain angle stuck with it and that's been a selling point since. So shoot 'em.

    But beyond that, can you think of any other reason for an aftermarket bridge? No? There are a few
    - Adjustable string spacing - Schaller Roller
    - Individual string bridges - Hipshot, Custom Shop Parts
    - Adjustable break angle over the saddle - Wilkinson
    - Longer intonation adjustments - BA II

    to name a few...
     
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I not only have tried the Gibson bridge, I own a 1960 EB-0. It's broken and sits in the closet these days, but I'm well familiar with it. Sustain was the least of my worries with that bass.

    Anyway, I see that opinions that differ from the majority are not welcome at Talkbass. People here obviously want to modify their basses and spend their money in ways that I consider wasteful and don't want to be told otherwise. Suit yourselves.
     
  15. No one has challenged your right to an opinion and if you were intellectually honest in this discussion and actually read and comprehended the posts you would understand that. Taking the "no one here at TB likes dissenting opinions" route is a chicken**** charge usually made by folks with little or nothing to actually add. You can't argue the fact that you really don't like other people with other ideas so you deflect the criticism by attacking TB and it's other members. You've made sweeping, blanket statements that in a month of Sundays can't be true because you simply haven't experienced every single situation you claim to know the answer for. But that's your bag isn't it? And you do it soooo well! So instead of addressing the charge of being closeminded to other's experience, you go whinybritches. Like ignoring the salient points of my last post. Why don't you talk about the other reasons people buy aftermarket bridges? OK, take your ball and go home, and when you learn to respect the fact the there are many other ideas - right or wrong - that might differ from your own, come on back and play nice.

    Well, I guess I did get drawn into an argument now didn't I? :rolleyes:
     
  16. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    So we step it up and call me a coward because I chose not to argue? Well nobody calls me a coward. You want an argument? OK wiseguy, here you go...

    1. Adjustable string spacing: I have a Schaller bridge on my fretless P. Those rollers are annoying. Every time I take a string off, the rollers roll and completely screw up the spacing, and I have to take out a ruler and readjust them every single time.

    2. Individual string bridges: You show me the advantage to that and I'll buy one. Until then, this falls into the category of, "nice but what's the point?"

    3. Adjustable break angle: Again, what's the point? Is the break angle of a Fender bridge so bad that you need to be able to adjust it? It doesn't break strings prematurely. The strings have enough tension but not too much. So unless you're just a really finicky person who wants complete control over every single little aspect, I see no need for it.

    4. Longer intonation adjustments: If your bridge is in the right spot to begin with, you don't need longer adjustments.

    There. Now I've addressed your points. And I would like it to be known that I have done my best to be civil in this, and you have done your best to be argumentative and needlessly rude because I have an opinion that you don't like. I only responded to your last message because you called me a coward.

    MOD EDIT - THAT'S ENOUGH OF THAT.
     



Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.