1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

I think i found a great band

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by ColtraneWorship, Jun 16, 2007.


  1. ColtraneWorship

    ColtraneWorship

    Jun 17, 2006
    Madrid
    Just wanted to share it with my fellow bassists. I just came (after two excruciating hours of subway), from the first rehearsal of a band. The rest of the bandmates really have a great technical skill, which i lack. They don't seem to matter that i am not as good as them.

    I am enthusiatic about this band. We've been playing three hours and it was quite good. I have the impression i can learn a lot from this people.

    Anyway, i want to ask for advice. I've always played with people that play more ore less at the same level that i do. This not being the case now, i want to know, if any of you has played with people that were much better that him/her, what are your impressions on the subject.

    Have you learned? If so, what? Have you had problems because of your lack of skill? If so, how?

    Well, any thougths are appreciated. I wanted you to know there is one more happy bassist in the world.
     
  2. TheDarkReaver

    TheDarkReaver Inactive

    Mar 20, 2006
    Lincolnshire, UK
    eating a subway for 2 hours must be excruciating.
     
  3. Hi, ColtraneWorship

    :D :D

    IMHO it's not the skill level, it's the general attitude towards playing. The feel/groove or whatever anyone wants to call it.

    It's the same with all the instruments, one can play less but well, or more but worse. The timing is everything and if that is covered, anything else is just learning more complicated stuff. And better musicians are by far the best motivator if one is serious about learning.

    Some problems may arise if the other musicians are more advanced in musical theory and so speak a language that is foreign to You. But if You make your knowledge level known in the beginning and are willing to learn theory, that shouldn't be a problem either.

    Congrats on the happy experience, hope it goes well.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  4. Silas Martinez

    Silas Martinez

    Jan 17, 2007
    Denver, CO
    Lucky you.

    I'm often in the opposite boat - not that I'm an amazing bassist, but I know some theory, enjoy odd meters, and 'speak the language' if you will. Most of the bands I've played with, even when they've had fairly solid technique, seem to lack the underlying theory.

    hrmmph. Maybe I need to get into Jazz.
     
  5. arbitrary

    arbitrary

    Oct 24, 2005
    Boston, MA
    Yes, its good to do.

    Its called scaffolding and deals with the Zone of Proximal Development; it is used heavily in education (good education).


    Avoid problems by practicing/learning your bum off and trying to become a better player.

    I've done it a huge majority of my life and it has payed off beautifully for me.

    Congrats!
     
  6. tlwaps

    tlwaps

    Feb 13, 2006
    Ohio
    IMO you don't have to be great to be a good bassist. You don't have to be Les Claypool, Geddy Lee, Victor Wooten...etc. A bass player lays down the groove, if you can lay down a decent groove and keep it then you're doing you're job.
     
  7. louieeadg

    louieeadg uncle petey?

    Jun 13, 2007
    outer banks, nc
    You're in a great situation, I was in two situation exactly like you. I started out with a guy who's been around music his entire life....I learned alot....I read, I listened, I practiced-it made me want to practice so I could add more(not more notes, but more substance)to the group. Everytime I showed up for practiced I had learned something new and he was grinning his gluteus maximus off...I eventually taught him stuff.

    Other situation...I'm part of a three piece. The guitarist has played for 8 years or so and knows theory inside out...kinda hurts him sometimes, he thinks too much. I know just enough so we can communicate but being a bassist, I keep him at bay, he won't venture into territory unless he knows we're both ready to go there....it makes for a great musical relationship. He drives me to learn more...I confine him to a clear-cut area so he knows where his room is....I know how you feel-doesn't it feel great?!
     
  8. louieeadg

    louieeadg uncle petey?

    Jun 13, 2007
    outer banks, nc
    oh, and yeah-ran into problems, but if their good, they'll help you or they'll know what they have to work with and make it work....shoot, mozart used to do entire sonatas in one note...well-more or less....
     
  9. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    Most of the musicians I've played with have been able to play circles around me. I consider myself incredibly fortunate. What it meant to me was that I had to work 3Xs harder than usual and make certain that I nailed everything they put on my plate. I think it's the best way you can grow as a musician. Much better IMO than playing with people below your level. Although the latter is nicer on the ego. :)
     
  10. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Mar 7, 2021

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.