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I used to think the smiths sucked!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Gabu, Sep 19, 2001.


  1. Gabu

    Gabu

    Jan 2, 2001
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Back when I was a metal head in the 80s... I thought those guys were a buncha panzies. I just learned to play "The boy with the thorn in his side". It has a really fun groove to it. :)

    I guess back when I was 16/17 I really didn't know everything yet. ;)
     
  2. Gabu

    Gabu

    Jan 2, 2001
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Brown Eyed Girl by Van Morrison.

    Easy bass line. I listen to it in the car a lot on the way to work. It's not fast. It's not crowed with notes... But dagnabbit... When I play it it sounds like a white boy trying to get down. Interestingly enough... that's exactly accurate. I have like zero soul. I need to work so much on my timing and feel. Hmmmm....
     
  3. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I love to play that song. Of course, I have embellished(;)) the original line, at the request of my bandleader.
     
  4. the smiths are darn cool. i have "louder than bombs" and definitely prefer it to the shredhead cheese that was going on in the 80's.
     
  5. Mike

    Mike

    Sep 7, 2000
    Cali
    I was a metalhead in the 80's too but I still think The Smiths suck. Girlfriend in a Coma? What the hell's that all about? :confused: :)
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    A mocking and "controversial" single, this excellent though lightweight song is an example of Morrissey clearly laughing at those who consider him shocking. His unnecessarily journo-baiting flippancy about death in this song is hilarious in context as he gravely sings "I know - it's serious" before the intentionally foot-in-mouth "there were times when I could have murdered her".
    Morrissey makes it remarkably easy for anyone to see he is provoking controversiality by placing "murdered" and "strangled" in quotes - probably why this song didn't actually cause much of a media ruckus when it was released as a single.
     
  7. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    The Smiths' Andy Rourke was a kickin' bassist. Very creative lines. Totally underappreciated. I learned to play when they were hot. Barbarism Begins at Home, What Difference Does it Make?,... Take a listen and learn some of those lines. Pretty nice stuff. Not a boring bassline in the bunch.
     
  8. APouncer

    APouncer

    Nov 3, 2000
    Lancashire, UK
    Bassline to "Bigmouth Strikes Again" is rocking. I think he's a solid bassplayer with a lot of humour and melody in his playing.
     
  9. Originally posted by ZuluFunk
    The Smiths' Andy Rourke was a kickin' bassist. Very creative lines. Totally underappreciated. I learned to play when they were hot. Barbarism Begins at Home, What Difference Does it Make?,... Take a listen and learn some of those lines. Pretty nice stuff. Not a boring bassline in the bunch.

    I agree completely! And I really like The Smiths music. I'll add that I think "Girlfriend In a Coma" is an extremely clever tune, but I really like "What Difference Does It Make?" and "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out:"
    "And if a double-decker bus,
    crashes into us,
    To die by your side,
    Is such a heavenly way to die.

    And if a 10 ton truck,
    Kills the both of us,
    To die by your side,
    Well, the pleasure and the
    privelidge is mine."

    That's really clever songwriting to me.
     
  10. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    I have always liked the Smiths. A lot of cool stuff.

    .........Frankly Mr. Shankly, this position I've held, it paves my way and it corrodes my soul...........
     
  11. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Amazing. The Smiths had some four albums out before "Strangeways, here we come" (the one with "Girlfriend in a Coma", but people keep on ragging on that one. GIAC is not the best song on that album in my opinion. I think "Paint a Vulgar Picture is a far better one, but of course, it wasn't made into a video...:rolleyes:

    I have Louder than Bombs, Hatful of Hollow, Meat is Murder and their Self-titled first album. I'm keeping an eye out for the collection The World Won't listen. They're all great, but I bet people at the time were either banging their heads to G n' R or bopping to the Fine Young Cannibals, and then they say the Smiths sucked! :rolleyes:

    ..and breathe.

    Here are some great pre GIAC tunes:

    Reel Around the Fountain
    What Difference Does it Make?
    These Things Take Time
    This Charming Man ("Why pamper life's complexities when the leather runs smooth in the passenger seat?" is a great line)

    Barbarism Begins at Home

    Jeez, too many to list.
     
  12. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    Actually, though my commentary was limited toward the bass playing of Rourke, I agree that the lyrics are some of the most creative I can remember from the '80s.

    "Sir" leads the troops, jealous of youth. Same old suit since 1962.

    Girls afraid, "Where do his intentions lay or does he even have any?" She says "He never even looks at me. I give him every opportunity...I'll never make that mistake again."

    Boy afraid, "Prudence never pays, and everything she wants costs money." He says "She doesn't even like me. And I know because she said so...I'll never make that mistake again."

    Let me get my hands on your mammary glands...
     
  13. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Cemetery Gates

    A dreaded sunny day, so I meet you at the cemetery gates.
    Keats and Yeats are on your side.

    A dreaded sunny day, so I meet you at the cemetery gates
    Keats and Yeats are on your side.
    While Wilde is on mine.

    So we go inside and we gravely read the stones.
    All those people, all those lives, where are they now?
    With loves and hates and passions just like mine, they were born and then they lived and then they died.
    Seems so unfair. I want to cry.

    You say: "ere thrice the sun done salutation to the dawn"
    and you claim these words as your own.
    But I've read well, and I've heard them said
    a hundred times, maybe less, maybe more...

    If you must write prose and poems
    the words you use should be your own
    don't plagiarise or take "on loan"
    there's always someone, somewhere
    with a big nose, who knows
    and who trips you up and laughs
    when you fall
    who'll trip you up and laugh
    when you fall

    You say: "ere long done do does did"
    words which could only be your own
    and you then produce the text
    from whence it was ripped, some dizzy whore, 1804

    A dreaded sunny day
    so let's go where we're happy
    and I meet you at the cemetery gates.
    Oh Keats and Yeats are on your side

    A dreaded sunny day
    so let's go where we're wanted
    and I meet you at the cemetery gates
    Keats and Yeats are on your side
    but you lose,
    because Wilde is on mine.
    (Shut up)


    Another great line -

    Life's very long when you're lonely...