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Ich bin ein Berliner.

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bassackwards, Feb 26, 2003.


  1. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    OREGON
    !CAUTION! Shameless bragging contained within!
    Check out what I gots me:
    [​IMG]
    Dean Jeff Berlin Standard. Got it for 400.00 shipped, brand-new in an unopened box. Made in Czech Republic. Custom passive Bartolinis. BadassII. Deluxe Scallers. Solid Alder (apears to be one piece). Three piece hard maple neck with ebony fretboard. Woudja believe it? This thing sounds sweet. Did I get a good deal? Stay tuned for further reviews....:bassist:
     
  2. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    you are a jelly donut ?
     
  3. I think it means "I too am a berliner"
     
  4. A Berliner is a Jelly donut over there. I am a Berliner is (I think) Ich bin Berliner...but it's been a long time since I've seen Eddie Izzard

    *JMX, help us out here...*
     
  5. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
  6. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Amerikaner [american]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    OREGON
    Yep. And you can eat me.:)
     
  8. Well glad that is clarified. I was thinking of the city of Berlin.


    And sweet bass bassackwards!
     
  9. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    I dig the artwork of the 1st Beasty Boys album too :p ;)
     
  10. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    OREGON
    What? I thought I was quoting JFK. I'm definitely no expert, though.
     
  11. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    http://www.hs.ebruns.k12.nj.us/hs/orgs/germanclub/Musik/berlin.wav


    from http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/weekly/aa021700a.htm



    "Dear Guide:

    I have heard and read from several different sources the story that John F. Kennedy made a major German language blunder in his famous "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech in Berlin, Germany. The story goes that he should have said "Ich bin Berliner" ("I am a citizen of Berlin"), and that "Ich bin ein Berliner" really means "I am a jelly donut." (A "Berliner" is in fact a type of jelly donut made in Berlin.) One of my German instructors even claimed this is true, and I once saw it published in a major American magazine, although I forget which one.

    Several years ago when I visited Germany, I found myself having drinks with a German journalist who struck me as fairly intelligent, so I asked her the question. She said that it is certainly not true. President Kennedy said the phrase absolutely correctly, although possibly with a thick American accent. It seems that the German language is simply not that trivial - it has subtleties that very few non-native speakers grasp. She said that if President Kennedy had said "Ich bin Berliner," he would have sounded silly because with his heavy accent he couldn't possibly have come from Berlin. But by saying "Ich bin ein Berliner," he actually said "I am one with the people of Berlin." This is her exact translation as best I can remember it.

    I believe, although someone would have to verify it, that President Kennedy actually didn't know German very well, if at all. He had a German journalist translate the phrase for him, and that journalist coached him at length on exactly how to say the phrase.

    Dear Reader:

    Your informant was right on the mark. This is truly The Gaffe That Never Was, despite reports to the contrary in venues as prestigious as the New York Times and Newsweek magazine. Experts say Kennedy's German was perfectly correct when he uttered those words near the Berlin Wall on June 26, 1963. The phrase had been translated for him by a professional interpreter.

    It's true that the word "Berliner" in German means a particular kind of pastry as well as a citizen of Berlin. But look at it this way: if I were to tell a group of Americans that my editor is a New Yorker, would any of them really think I have him confused with a weekly magazine?

    Even AltaVista's Babel Fish translation software - not always the most accurate of interpreters - was able to make sense of the phrase. It rendered "Ich bin ein Berliner" into English as "I am a citizen of Berlin" without missing a ping."
     
  12. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    OREGON
    Thanks! It sure sounds and plays awesome. The only thing that's weird is the pickup placement. I'm already getting used to it. I'll have to fiddle with it a few more days before I can give a real review.:bassist:
     
  13. I was going to ask about the pick up placement on the Jeff Berlin sig. bass. how does it affect the sound vs. a bass with pickups placed in a more traditional spacing and not so close to the bridge?
     
  14. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    JT, you're right of course.

    Though it really can mean both things, the context makes it absolutely clear that it's "I am a citizen of Berlin".

    JFK did not make a mistake.

    bassackwards, I was referring to the plane number on the album cover which said EAT ME when read upside down.
     
  15. jazzcatb17

    jazzcatb17

    Dec 27, 2002
    Louisville, Ky
    Dean makes such fine instruments, especially for the low prices. A good friend has a Edge 6 which sounds a nd plays fairly awesome, but the active electronics are going up on it.
     
  16. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    see now, if it was ted kennedy, he would've just cut to the chase, not left any doubt or question in anyone's mind, and said "i am a fricken danish. watch me eat myself".




    that wasn't political was it? do i have to warn myself? :eek: :D.
     
  17. lew - ven - brow

    4 and a half years of german did not goto waste!
     
  18. TRU

    TRU

    Apr 12, 2002
    Northern Europe
     
  19. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    bräu is quite like "broy" the oy like in oyster.
     
  20. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2001
    Glasgow, Scotland

    Oh!

    I worked for a sub contractor a few years ago, and one of the German engineers from our customer visited the plant. Stranegly enough we got on to beers!!

    Lowenbrau (can't find the umlout(sp?)) was one of my favourite beers at the time (still is, but it's harder to find now...)

    Anyway, the way he pronounced it was like 'low-ven-brow' With 'brow' as in eyebrow!

    Is this wrong? 'Cos that's kinda how it's stuck in my mind!

    Also, does it tranlsate as Lion Brew??? or Lion Beer??:)