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ideas?

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by noelito, Jun 10, 2007.


  1. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    Hi, feeling a bit stuck with the db at the moment.
    Ok i know primary function is to supply to supply a solid rhythmic anchor,I do that with root,fifth as absolute basic with a few fills between and of course, changing when the chords change.
    However i am looking to play something more melodic whilst holding the basic rhythm together, maybe across 2,3 0r 4 bars. this can be either if there is one chord for these bars or even two or three chord changes. Sometimes it is easier when there are more chords as there is more choice.
    Hope i am making myself clear,any ideas, pointers?
    thanks
    noelito
     
  2. Why do I get the vibe that you might be leaning on charts and not using your ears?
    Is this true?
    If so, maybe get away from the charts and start trusting your ears.
     
  3. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    yes your rikght thnks paul but some of the changes are colored ( flat 5s, aug 9, inversions) that i can't distinguish the main tone of the chord N
     
  4. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    :confused: :confused: yes your rikght thnks paul but some of the changes are colored ( flat 5s, aug 9, inversions) that i can't distinguish the main tone of the chord N
     
  5. Do you mean the tonic? It takes a minute to figure out your short-hand.....
     
  6. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    yes, the tonic of the chord,which is difficult to distinguish when listening to the changes on say the piano. Also I have tried listening to the melody,either vocal or instrumental but that uses many different notes, both part of the chord and the scale.
    So it is more of a feeling where the centre of the chord is and the key your in, rather than just memorising the progression. N
     
  7. Are you saying that you can't 'HUM' the tonic when you hear a chord?
    Or play it on your bass? Sorry i'm taking so long on this.
     
  8. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    Sometimes i can't hum the tonic of a chord. the tonic might be in the middle of a chord and so hard to hear. N
     
  9. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    Augusta GA
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    What ear training work are you doing?
     
  10. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    not a great deal at the moment. Working out the chords of a tangos from a flamenco cd. Some time back I was using a book 'Ear training for improvisors a total approach'
    by thom david mason, mainly exercises and drills and recognising intervals,not much actual music itself .
    N
     
  11. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    Augusta GA
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    I'd get back to it, if I were you. You want to build a good foundation before you start putting the walls up and being able to hear and identify and sing intervals in the first octave, in the second octave, triads in closed position and all inversions, in open positions in all inversions, 4 part chords, 4 parts with one tension and 4 parts with two tensions are going to be what gets you to a point that you can hear a line that is melodic and carries the harmony forward.

    Are you studying with anyone?
     
  12. I was gonna say that....ha. Get a teacher!
     
  13. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    Yes thanks,
    the book i mentioned has a lot of what you said in it, with accompanying tape. it is hard work,quite tiring. the drills and exercises are very dry .N
     
  14. Not so dry with a teacher explaining and demonstrating.
     
  15. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    Chicago
    Plus the fact that, yeah, it's hard but that's how you know you have to work on it. If it was easy, you wouldn't have to do it, no? There are no shortcuts, if you want to hear that stuff in order to give you better ideas, you have to practice it over and over till you CAN hear it. It will get easier...it just takes time. Alot of ear training can be done away from your instrument..
     
  16. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    And maybe one who doesn't play bass? A lesson or two with a horn player can give one a shift in melodic perspective.
     
  17. noelito

    noelito

    Jan 29, 2007
    so having lessons with melody instument say a tenor sax will not only help with melody perspective but also help to hear the underlying harmony as well perhaps?
     
  18. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    If you find someone who is an accomplished player with a thorough understanding of harmony it might. Do you imagine Coltrane or Mike Brecker or Joe Henderson wouldn't have had some interesting perspectives on hearing harmonies?
     
  19. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jan 21, 2021

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