Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

identify this old timer

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by rusmannx, Mar 22, 2005.


  1. rusmannx

    rusmannx

    Jul 16, 2001
    so a man i work with used to play bass back in the 70's. he tells me he still has his bass, and he thinks it's a vox.
    i can't find "vox" anywhere on it, and i have no idea on how to search for this thing.
    question #1: what is it?
    question #2: when was it made?
    question #3: what would it be worth today?
    question #4: do i dare try to tune it?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    Ampeg scroll bass anyone? I don't remember the excat model, but I'm pretty sure that's what it is...

    Ray
     
  3. Thornton Davis

    Thornton Davis Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Toronto
    It's a late 60's Aria-Diamond Model 1420B. They were also branded under the Univox name as the Model 1920B.

    Notice the Diamond on the headstock and the tailpiece.

    It's missing its pickguard. Which is where the Univox name was located.

    They sold for $145.00 new.

    Here's a photo of one from the Bizarre Guitars book.

    [​IMG]

    TD
     
  4. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    or that :p

    Ray:D
     
  5. No, it's definitely not an Ampeg and I don't think it's a Vox. I think it's an Italian bass, perhaps an Eko or Rossetti. I think Vox subcontracted the manufacture of their instruments to one of the Italian companies in the late 60's, but the Vox logo would have been on these instruments.
     
  6. rusmannx

    rusmannx

    Jul 16, 2001
    thanks for the responses everyone.
    so do you guys think i should string it up? i'm a little paranoid of bending the neck.

    also, it has a serial number 2130467 on the back where the bolt plate is..... if this helps with identification.
     
  7. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Go back and forth between the pix.
    Thornton Davis already got it right.
     
  8. Thornton Davis

    Thornton Davis Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Toronto
    The neck should hold just fine. Put a set of short scale 30" roundwound or flatwounds on it. The flatwounds that are on it now look like they've been there forever.

    With a serial number of 2130467, I would expect that the last two digits identify the year of manufacture.

    I always liked this particular violin style body shape with the scroll headstock. Most of these basses still out there have had the tuning machines replaced due to the plastic knob breaking off, so heads up on them.

    If you're not sure whether or not you're going to keep it, i'd buy it off you.

    TD
     
  9. RED J

    RED J I ain't ready for the junkyard yet. Supporting Member

    Jan 23, 2000
    Tennessee
    Among the other tells already given, the rosewood filled trapeze bridge is a dead giveawy for Matsumoku produced instruments.They built Aria, Westone,Electra, Conrad, and several other common and less common "house" brands. All in all considered good instruments in contrast to many imports of the time. Lots of info on these cool 70's era instruments here.
    http://www.therathole.org/guitars/guitars.html

    RED J :D
     
  10. rusmannx

    rusmannx

    Jul 16, 2001
    i have no idea what this thing would even be worth, but i'm sure the owner would consider selling it.
     
  11. EdPass

    EdPass

    Mar 12, 2005
    FWIW: I realize the bass in question has already been correctly identified, but I think I understand where the speculation about Italian origin comes from.

    I played an Italian-made Hofner knockoff for a short time in 1960 or 1970. I believe the brand name was Orpheum. At the time, it seemed pretty special. There was an importer in New York who was trying to establish that brand name here with a variety of copied styles. I had a blonde copy of an Epiphone semi-hollow back then, too.

    Anyway, I traded the Italian violin-body bass for a 1962 Fender Jazz Bass. The bass player of the band who covered our regular bar job one weekend like the looks of the Orpheum. Plus, the Jazz sounded really dead -- largely because the felt mutes were still wrapped around the strings at the bridge. But that's another story ...

    Ed
     
  12. When I started my response, Thornton Davis' post correctly identifying the bass hadn't posted. I never owned an Eko, but I played many. They were quite common in Buffalo, NY in the 60's and 70's (as were Traynor amps). I was shooting from the hip, but it sure looked a lot like an Eko to me.
     
  13. My student brought one to show me. It was similar in the body and headstock. It was a sunburst and had a different bridge an PU's. I figured it was Japanese because of the tuners and PUs and crappy bridge. It had a nice old school sound. It played decent and had a rich woody sound. It was neck heavey and the bridge was difficult to intonate and was missing its cover to protect the hands. I cleaned it and the electronics and did a set up for him. It sounded way better than his Epi.
    Peace,
    Benton