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If you teach bass, do you use books?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by steveg, Aug 4, 2002.


  1. steveg

    steveg

    Feb 26, 2002
    Madison, WI
    I've been asked to consider giving bass lessons at a local studio. I've given guitar lessons in the past and have materials I like to use, but I don't really have anything for bass. If there's anyone out there who gives lessons, are there any books you could recommend?

    I like to start out with the basics and get them started playing recognizable tunes as soon as possible, even if it's only something like "Happy Birthday"
     
  2. sbasssman

    sbasssman Guest

    Jan 1, 2002
    >I like to start out with the basics and get them started playing recognizable tunes as soon as possible, even if it's only something like "Happy Birthday"

    It's a good and appropriate thought. You'll probably be a good teacher.
    But be careful here, friend. If you seek advice and real information -- outside of sarcasm -- on this type of topic here, you are likely to invoke the Wrath Of Khan.

    aka -- a sarcastic, uppity response from the academic jazz teachers here who must be sleep deprived.

    (Footnote: the recent Desert Island thread)
     
  3. iplaybass

    iplaybass Guest

    Feb 13, 2000
    Germantown, TN
    I like to teach my student songs he wants to learn, and then help him figure out what key it is in, the intervals used, and the theory behind the song. I find this works very well, it balances their desire to learn their favorite songs, and their need to learn some theory. I've only had one student, however, and I plan to pass him on once I have taught him all I can about theory and improv.
     
  4. James S

    James S

    Apr 17, 2002
    New Hampshire
    steveg,

    I teach and use many books. The challenge is finding material simple enough to use with lower level students.

    I would like to recommend "Reading In Bass Clef". The bulk of the book is very simple melodies which employ basic intervals. Short 4, 8, and 12 bar melodic statements are the staple of this book.

    I have had tremendous success with this book.

    http://www.jimstinnett.com/books.html#anchorbassclef

    Jim
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Each student is different, so your approach will need to be flexible. I teach a mixture of college music majors, non majors, and also regular folks who are only studying for their own enjoyment. For the college kids, I have a pretty demanding technique requirement, and beyond that it's about helping each student find his or her voice.

    For the "regular folks", I try to provide a healthy mix of material: Some material that addresses a particular technical need (like reading, jazz theory, etc.), and some stuff to keep things interesting for the particular student in question. For reading studies, I can highly recommend Mel Bay's Note Reading Studies for Bass, which starts from the very beginning and takes the student through 16th note subdivisions by the end. Standing in the Shadows of Motown is an excellent reading supplement for more advanced students.

    As far as the "fun stuff", I usually just require each student to bring a 3 ring binder full of manuscript paper, and gradually fill it with material of the student's choosing which I transcribe into notation during the lesson. The common scenario with most students is that their ability to read is at a far lower level than the level of the music they want to play, so the transcription method keeps them interested in working on their reading skills while they are playing whatever music they want. It also keeps them in close touch with the transcription process, and most of them want to start learning that whole process when they're ready.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. stroggnoy

    stroggnoy Guest

    Jul 11, 2002
    I don't think I'd ever study with a cat... I think I'd get more out of a human.
     
  7. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    So finally somebody made this come true - it was doing so well until the last post, almost completey sarcasm -free! ;)
     
  8. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Good point. I'd like to personally apologize to Steve G on behalf of all the sleep deprived academic jazz teachers here at TB: The amount of sarcasm and "uppity" pedantry in this thread has reached epic proportions, for which we should all be deeply ashamed. What a pity we couldn't have managed to include some useful information along with all of the sarcastic chaff. I feel sure that I speak for of all my jazz colleagues on this matter when I say that I am deeply, deeply sorry. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Better sleep deprived than REALITY deprived.