1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

I'm sorry to bore you all and to ask another question, but...

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by REDLAWMAN, Jan 2, 2012.


  1. Mark Dinning: 'Teen Angel'.

    Very simple: very slow; C; Am; F; G; G7.

    Assuming I'm playing roots, when the chord progression moves from G to G7, do I simply either drop two strings, or drop two frets on the same string and pluck only the flatted 7th?

    I will master this..... :)
     
  2. millertx

    millertx

    Dec 18, 2006
    Flower Mound, TX
    If you are only playing roots, you play the G root for both the G and G7 chords. You don't have to move at all for this change.
     
  3. cjmodulus

    cjmodulus

    Jul 15, 2010
    Not entirely sure what your asking here, but G and G7 have the same root. The difference is the addition of the flatted 7th, like you mentioned. The 7th is probably added to increase the dominant sound of the chord, and to make the resolution back to C more noticeable. If you want to play this up a bit, you could play a B over the G7 (the third) so that you lead smoothly back to the C. I've never heard this song, but that's usually how I like to approach things like that.
     
  4. otherclef

    otherclef

    Aug 10, 2011
    Charleston

    +1
     
  5. I thought the F was the flatted 7th?
     
  6. To maintain the G for 2/3 bars becomes tedious in the extreme.
     
  7. millertx

    millertx

    Dec 18, 2006
    Flower Mound, TX
    Then move off the root as cjmodulus explained. You have 4 notes available in the G7 chord (G, B, D, F). Using the B gives you a strong movement back to the C chord, the D can work this way also, although not quite as strong of a resolution. Using the F is likely your last choice for a strong resolution from G7 to C. Mix it up between these choices and see what you think fits the song better.
     
  8. cjmodulus

    cjmodulus

    Jul 15, 2010
    Exactly. If you don't want to stay on the G, you could really just play with some arpeggio patterns off of the G7 chord, but to really strengthen the resolution back to C, try to end it on a D or (ideally) B.
     
  9. You're losing me big time, here.

    It's G to G7, so to try to obviate the monotony of playing simply G; G; G; G, I don't in fact just play the flatted 7th when the chord changes to G7?
     
  10. It's the slowest, most simple song ever: I'd be hugely appreciative if one of you could please take the time out to listen to it for 2 mins and then point me in the right direction, please.
     
  11. cjmodulus

    cjmodulus

    Jul 15, 2010
    Well, yes and no. The notes in a G7 chord that you can use are G (the root), B (the third), D (the fifth), and F (the flatted 7th).

    Instead of just playing G G G G (assuming your using all quarter notes) for one bar of G7, you could try G G D B and that would take you right back to C. I'm sorry if I'm not breaking this down well enough, I'll go take a listen to that song and be right back with another suggestion.
     
  12. DBCrocky

    DBCrocky

    Oct 18, 2011
    Cary, NC
    Under the G7 chord, you can play any of the notes in the G7 chord.

    Yes, the Flatted 7th is F, and you can play an F under the G7 chord.

    But you could also play the 3rd (B), or the 5th (D), or the root (G).

    They all are mathematically correct.

    Which one sounds the best is up to you.
     
  13. Let It Fall

    Let It Fall Banned

    Oct 15, 2009
    Baton Rouge
    I listened to it and the only time he does that progression is at the beggining and the end. In that instant I would play a G for the G and then walk up C D or D E and then an octave higher G for the G7
     
  14. Let It Fall

    Let It Fall Banned

    Oct 15, 2009
    Baton Rouge
    Another option is playing a B or C for the Gchord and then a G for G7. But play whatever sounds good.
     
  15. millertx

    millertx

    Dec 18, 2006
    Flower Mound, TX
    The version I found on YouTube was a 50's slow ballad, even if it was a bit faster you could play G D G B in place of the G G G G.
     
  16. cjmodulus

    cjmodulus

    Jul 15, 2010
    I got the same one, and yeah, there's lots of things you could get away with under that.
     
  17. It's the 50's ballad....

    I feel a bit stupid asking, now, but I've only had my bass for a very short time.

    Thank you all, very much.
     
  18. cjmodulus

    cjmodulus

    Jul 15, 2010
    No worries man! No matter how long you play, there's always room for improvement. It's good that your asking questions- because that's one of the best ways to get answers. Good luck with this tune!
     
  19. Thank you, CJM; much appreciated: as is everyone else's help.
     
  20. F is the flatted 7th of G... but the root of G7 is nevertheless "G".

    If just hanging on the G is too monotonous, try moving through the chord tones:

    G triad chord tones: G, B, D
    G7 chord tones: G, B, D, F
     

Share This Page