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Im sure that this has been discussed before, but I need help with notes (not tabs)

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by tallguybcs, Mar 10, 2001.


  1. Ok, i have a chrch gig tomorrow, and need to learn the song (I know its a little late, but I can do it)

    Ok, I know that this is a g

    ---------
    ---------
    ---------
    ---------
    ---0-----

    but is it the low g or the octave g

    Im assuming its the low g, but if it is, then the song asks for a c thats below the g, and I dont have a 5 string.

    I just want to know if the notei showed above in the 3rd note on the E string or the 5th note on the D string, thanks
     
  2. that's the G on the 4th string.

    for the C, you can just play the C on your A string.
     
  3. so then the low E would be WAY below the 5 lines? (i used to know the name of that, now i cant remember)
     
  4. the e is:


    -------------
    -------------
    -------------
    -------------
    -------------
    -o-

    It's an added one. That's the open E.

    the higher e is

    -------------

    -------------
    o
    -------------

    -------------

    -------------

    there.
     
  5. but if that is the open E, then wouldnt
    ---------
    ---------
    ---------
    ---------
    ----0----
    be the low g, since its 3 notes above an open E?



    and one more thing, if the staff has a flat on the E, does that apply to ALL the E's., even the octaves?
     
  6. Yea, I said that was the low G.

    If the staff has a flat on the E then that means throughout the whole thing the E is flat unless you get a natural sign.
     
  7. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Is this an actual bass part or a piano part? String bass/electric bass parts are written an octave above where they are intended to sound. Piano parts are written to sound where they are written. If you are reading from a piano score, you would play an octave higher.

    If the music in a bass chart shows

    |-------
    |
    |-------
    |
    |-------
    |
    |-------
    |
    |-------

    -----

    -O-


    (the little "thingies" below the staff are called "ledger lines") then the part is asking for the low C - first fret on the low B string of a 5-string. But if this note is written in the bass clef of a piano score, then it means the 3rd fret on the A string.

    The good news is that if you are playing along with a piano player, in most cases it won't matter what octave you're playing in. If you play the bass clef of a piano score as though it were a bass part, it will sound an octave lower than the piano, and that'll probably sound right to everybody involved. If it sounds "right", stay where you are. If it sounds odd to anyone, try changing the octave. As IKUITB says, if you see a note that's not in the range of the instrument in the register you've chosen (like the one I "wrote" above), just play the nearest one you have.
     
  8. BaroqueBass

    BaroqueBass

    Jul 8, 2000
    Salem, OR
    TOTALLY off topic here, but sorta on topic:

    Have any of you played like violin pieces on the bass? Transposing the piece down 2 octaves or so. I have found that the 2nd movement of Mozart's 4th violin concerto sounds ALOT better when played 2 octaves down on bass. It's pretty nifty. ^_^
     
  9. Murf

    Murf

    Mar 28, 2001
    Ireland
    In Notation for bass clef the lines are G B D F A
    ie:

    ---o--- A
    ---o--- F
    ---o--- D
    ---o--- B
    ---o--- G

    And the spaces are A C E G
    ie:

    ______
    ___o__ G
    ___o__ E
    ___o__ C
    ___o__ A


    hope this helps