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I'm teaching my sister to play bass!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by frankencow150, Feb 15, 2002.


  1. frankencow150

    frankencow150 Guest

    Oct 17, 2001
    Well every week or so she bugs me to teach her a song.Well half way through teaching her a simple song she gets bored and leaves.

    But...yesterday she said she really wanted to seriously learn,so I decided to teach her Bro Hymn by Pennywise.She showed me her commitment by sacrificing her 2 nails(pointer and finger) because she would always hit the strings with her nails.

    We both dont like Blink 182,but I told her that she should learn some of their songs because there the ones I started with because theyre easy.

    One problem she always has is that she cant pluck very fast with her 2 main fingers.She usually starts playing fast but then messes up.This happened to me in the beggining too,but it went away,practice I guess.She's only been playing for 1 1/2 days so I guess its just a matter of practice.After a couple of months I'm gonna have her try to memorize notes,teach her octaves,and scales,and maybe even some sheet music!

    Eh this is cool,I'm showing someone how to do something,instead of the other way around!

    Well my main question was just...how can she play faster without screwing up?I told her to pluck more gently but then the sound is very soft.



    :)
     
  2. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000
    TX
    Practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice and a little more practice.

    If the sound is soft, then you compensate by turning up the bass and amp. You'll never be able to play really fast with a hard attack.
     
  3. JimM

    JimM

    Jan 13, 2000
    Northern California
    Don't compromise good technique for speed.
    Always go as slow as needed to maintain the proper rhythm, tone quality and technique etc.
    And hunter 585 is right,I think a lot of good players play softly while playing fast.Stength will come after time,you may not notice it for a couple of weeks.
     
  4. She should play with a metronome set at a fairly slow beat, until she can play that perfectly. Then she moves it up a couple of notches, until she can play that perfectly. Just keep repeating that, until she hits the speed she needs.

    The light attack is also the way to go. If you're not digging into the strings, you can play with much better mobility.

    Lisa
     
  5. I agree - keep it slow and steady! Better to develop a good right hand technique.... even play half as many notes until she's ready for more.
     
  6. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    I started by just playing everything with my index finger. I think concentrating on the actual notes is a better route, where with a beginner, you are concentrating on your fingers too, and that would probaly be frustrating. I did that for about a month or two, then I just subconciously started using my middle finger and now I don't even have to think about it.

    Of couse, that was just my expierence, it could be different with you sister.
     
  7. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Sorry, I always disagree on this... ;)
    Playing back by the bridge, where the strings are more taut, requires a certain degree of attack(ie, more 'hard' than 'soft', IMO).
    Maybe this is becoming a 'lost art', I dunno...
    (And my hat's off to those who can pull off the 'light' touch thing!).

    FWIW, I would encourage a 'raw' beginner to get their hands in-shape FIRST-
    Plucking Hand: Strict alteration on 1st & middle fingers.

    If using a pick: Strict down/up motion. I used to teach my ex-gal...she insisted on using a pick & only made a tone happen on the UPSTROKE. Think about all that wasted energy!

    Fretting Hand: Minimal motion & independence exercises(you don't want those fingers flapping off the strings...keep 'em close & only move the one you need).

    All this is pretty boring stuff, right?
    ...I didn't do any of this stuff way back when; as a result, there was a lotta music I couldn't play 'cause I lacked the necessary technique. So, I hadda UNlearn alotta bad habits. ;)
     
  8. Getting her to use a pic doesnt mean she will be able to play fast straightaway. Either switch her to pick, or PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE etc.

    sim
     
  9. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Someone, I'm thinking it was Micheal Manring in his first instruction video, said for a beginner, just have them mute the strings with their left hand and practice strict two finger alternation. That simplifies the task of a raw beginner because they aren't slowed down with the task of fretting notes and alternating finger strokes at the same time.

    Just have her alternate on only one string first. When she has a solid grasp of that, have her alternate between the E-string and A string. When she has that down solidly, have her alternate between the E-string and the D-string. Then the E and the G-string. Then other combinations.

    After that you can have her actually fret notes. As she has demonstrated a short attention span, I think the best way to go is to really simplify her lessons, breaking them down into the simplest components and not overburden her with too much information at a time. Sooner or later, she'll catch up and have a nice foundation of fundamentals to boot.

    As for speed, explain to her that speed comes with time and practice, confidence and knowlege of bass fundamentals. What is the hurry, anyway? She has the rest of her life to play fast.